Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > Training

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 02-15-2007, 09:19 PM   #1
Suru
Location: Miami, FL
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 453
United_States
Offline
Love, Ego, and Learning

To enhance learning capabilities:

-Maximize love
Learning is possible on such a higher level when I feel love for the one imparting teachings. This is because I can associate those teachings with the good feelings I have for the person. Highly ignorant people can say and do perfectly correct things along with their nonsense. My filter works better the more I love these people. Much, much, much easier said than done therefore a trade-off exists.


-Minimize ego
Learning is possible on such a higher level when I humble myself sufficiently. If I already know it all, why would I need to learn? I may still pick up on things subconsciously when self-absorbed, but I would associate what I've gathered with looking down upon the teacher. How can I truly learn from someone or something I don't respect? There's a trade-off here as well: ego, arrogance, and self-absorption, which are almost one and the same, do create a comfort zone. But it is only a comfortable complacency.

Drew
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2007, 09:30 PM   #2
Ryan Sanford
Dojo: Northwest Aikido
Location: Oregon
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 70
United_States
Offline
Re: Love, Ego, and Learning

I totally agree, especially about minimizing ego. Many martial artists have fallen victim to their own pride, and it's a shame to see. Pride is an unfortunate thing, and I'd like to think that Aikido helps us over some that.
Good post.
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2007, 09:37 PM   #3
Mike Hamer
 
Mike Hamer's Avatar
Dojo: Shinki Rengo, Mt. Pleasant MI
Location: Alma, MI
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 244
United_States
Offline
Re: Love, Ego, and Learning

Good advice here Drew. I think the more I come to accept humility, no, embrace it, the easier it is for me to look past my own shortcomings, and try to strive towards becoming a better person overall.

To speak ill of anything is against the nature of Aikido
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2007, 04:16 AM   #4
SeiserL
 
SeiserL's Avatar
Dojo: Roswell Budokan, Kyushinkan Dojo, Aikido World Alliance
Location: Roswell, GA USA
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 3,704
United_States
Offline
Re: Love, Ego, and Learning

IMHO, to maximize love you must minimize ego because love is where you find yourself and lose yourself and to minimize ego (its not all about you) you will maximize your opportunity and openness to love.

Our major choice it to have love or fear, but you can't have both.

Nicely said. Compliments and appreciation.

Lynn Seiser PhD
Yondan Aikido & FMA/JKD
We do not rise to the level of our expectations, but fall to the level of our training. Train well. KWATZ!
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2007, 06:41 AM   #5
Kevin Leavitt
 
Kevin Leavitt's Avatar
Dojo: Aikido of Northern Virginia
Location: Stuttgart, Baden Wurttemberg
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 4,376
Germany
Offline
Re: Love, Ego, and Learning

But I LOVE my EGO!

Seriously Leavitt says, this is a good post!

Yes Lynn, I think Fear is the fuel of Ego, and fear is the biggest opponent we as Martial artist are training to defeat.
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2007, 11:24 AM   #6
Mark Freeman
Dojo: Dartington
Location: Devon
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 1,219
United Kingdom
Offline
Re: Love, Ego, and Learning

Quote:
Kevin Leavitt wrote:
But I LOVE my EGO!

Seriously Leavitt says, this is a good post!

Yes Lynn, I think Fear is the fuel of Ego, and fear is the biggest opponent we as Martial artist are training to defeat.
So it's ok to feel good about yourself when you eliminate fear, then??

regards,

Mark

Success is having what you want. Happiness is wanting what you have.
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2007, 04:48 PM   #7
Suru
Location: Miami, FL
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 453
United_States
Offline
Re: Love, Ego, and Learning

Quote:
Mark Freeman wrote:
So it's ok to feel good about yourself when you eliminate fear, then??

regards,

Mark
Even Buddha, Jesus, and O'Sensei couldn't eliminate fear, within or without...but they got much closer than most. How did they get so close? I'd like to know. No! I'd really, really like to know.

Drew
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2007, 06:11 PM   #8
Suru
Location: Miami, FL
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 453
United_States
Offline
Re: Love, Ego, and Learning

Quote:
Lynn Seiser wrote:

Our major choice it to have love or fear, but you can't have both.
You reminded me here of something I've been keeping tucked away. In the movie Donnie Darko, a schoolteacher and a motivational speaker, both of weak character, promote an idea that all of human emotion can be divided into the polar extremes of fear and love. Because the viewer feels compelled to strongly dislike the two characters, an association is made that makes me want to think, F-them and all they believe. This creates conflict in me because I agree with that concept! The easily liked protagonist challenges the idea in a bold manner. I cheer him for not simply being "another brick in the wall," but I lose respect for him because he can't keep himself in check in the process. Granted, he struggles with paranoid schizophrenia, but I also have an Axis I psychiatric disorder and I will never use that as an excuse for antisocial behavior. My primary points are that I agree with Lynn's post, and movies such as Donnie Darko challenge us to increase our ability to properly filter stimuli through maintaining at least some shred of respect and love for even the most despicable people.

Drew
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2007, 08:58 AM   #9
David Humm
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 269
United Kingdom
Offline
Re: Love, Ego, and Learning

Not to be pedantic or argumentative in any way but..

Love and or Ego won't suffice in the domain of conflict. Only workable well drilled and pressure tested waza.

Now, if we're talking only about the philosophical nature of aikido then fair enough however; and, with absolute and due respect to people reading this thread don't mix ideological/philosophical thinking with the concept that training with that as a primary mode of learning will provide you with the means to deal with a determined adversary, because it won't.

Regards
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2007, 09:49 AM   #10
Kevin Leavitt
 
Kevin Leavitt's Avatar
Dojo: Aikido of Northern Virginia
Location: Stuttgart, Baden Wurttemberg
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 4,376
Germany
Offline
Re: Love, Ego, and Learning

Well if love and hate or fear are polar...then wouldn't we be shooting for stasis, or the mid point of the blending of the two which is balance, nothing, harmony?

I can think of alot of attrocities that have been performed in the name of love.

Harmony would be the mid point of balance. I am reading a very good book on non-violence.

It points out that non-violence does not mean pacifism, or no violence.

When dealing with an adversary determined to harm, it would be appropriate to respond with action. It is not the action that defines the act of love or harmony, but the spirit and intent in which it was done in.

I think the concepts we are discussing are very salient to the concepts of training. The very nature of our training in budo is based on the intersection of philosophy and action.

When solidiers in combat detach themselves from the emotional aspects of violence and fighitng and shutdown in order to survive, they deal with a multitude of feelings and issues afterward that they must resolve. Lynn can comment more on this from a psychological standpoint than I.

It is important to train people how to deal with violence spiritually, mentally, as well physically.

  Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2007, 01:19 PM   #11
Suru
Location: Miami, FL
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 453
United_States
Offline
Re: Love, Ego, and Learning

Quote:
Kevin Leavitt wrote:

When solidiers in combat detach themselves from the emotional aspects of violence and fighitng and shutdown in order to survive, they deal with a multitude of feelings and issues afterward that they must resolve. Lynn can comment more on this from a psychological standpoint than I.
I can comment on this from a psychological standpoint also, though I'm neither a PhD nor PsyD nor LCSW. Since I was a kid in my boy scout times, my dad took me to airshows frequently. I loved sitting in F-16s, A-10s, walking through C-5 Galaxies, and even examing munitions such as 500 and 1000 lb. bombs, sidewinder missles, and the A-10's ridiculously awesome 30mm gun. I had many interests growing up, but becoming a fighter pilot was a big dream. I attended a program called the "Summer Scientific Seminar" at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs during summer vacation after 11th grade. That was so inspiring, that I decided to pursue application.

After interviewing with the panels of Senators Bob Graham and Connie Mack, I interviewed with Representative Peter Deutsch. All three interviews went well, but facing Deutsch's three-person panel, a man asked me, "[I'd like to give you a case scenario. Let's say you're flying over a target with orders to bomb it, and you realize on approach that it's a school full of children. What would you do?]" I said, "I'd call back." He said, "You can't call back." I said, "I would follow orders and bomb the target then later try to somehow deal with the fact that I killed innocent people." I got the nomination and received an appointment to the Academy. It just never had sunk into me how lethal and serious of a profession the military truly is. It tore me up inside, because I wanted to be a hero and fly fighter jets so much and for so long. I fell into a deep depression that lasted months, thinking--but not feeling--hope that I'd wake up happy one morning. Two weeks before it was time for me to report, as I had promised I would, I knew there was no way. Getting there and having upperclass cadets in my face screaming at me and all, I would've been on the next plane back home.

Simplicity, Complexity, oh what a Tragedy,
Reality, Insanity, Strange Normality

--Enigma, "Boum-Boum"

Drew
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2007, 05:13 PM   #12
SeiserL
 
SeiserL's Avatar
Dojo: Roswell Budokan, Kyushinkan Dojo, Aikido World Alliance
Location: Roswell, GA USA
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 3,704
United_States
Offline
Re: Love, Ego, and Learning

Quote:
Kevin Leavitt wrote:
The very nature of our training in budo is based on the intersection of philosophy and action.

When solidiers in combat detach themselves from the emotional aspects of violence and fighitng and shutdown in order to survive, they deal with a multitude of feelings and issues afterward that they must resolve. Lynn can comment more on this from a psychological standpoint than I.

It is important to train people how to deal with violence spiritually, mentally, as well physically.
IMHO, the map must match the territory. The larger the discrepancy, the larger the problem.

Lynn Seiser PhD
Yondan Aikido & FMA/JKD
We do not rise to the level of our expectations, but fall to the level of our training. Train well. KWATZ!
  Reply With Quote

Please visit our sponsor:

Seminar with Frank Doran, Shihan - Aug. 8-10, 2014 at Sunset Cliff's Aikido, near San Diego's finest beaches



Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:13 PM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2014 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2014 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate