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Old 02-06-2007, 12:53 AM   #401
Erick Mead
 
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Re: Baseline skillset

Quote:
Tim Fong wrote:
When Ushiro is talking about kata he is talking about karate kata. Like their Southern Shaolin ancestors, the Okinawans generally practice their basic kata without a "technique partner." As solo exercise.
See my earlier quote of him rearding bunkai kumite -- which is what aikido training is, based on well-understood forms, with many variations.
Quote:
Tim Fong wrote:
It's building the right kind of body to support Ushiro's karate technique.
And what is that budo body, exactly? He said that too:
Quote:
Ushiro wrote:
For example, what do you do when your opponent suddenly comes at you with a strong attack? Do you respond to it by clashing with equal ferocity? Or somehow absorb it? Or let it flow by? Or do you use some even more advanced means, like predicting the attack early on and controlling it with your ki? How you respond to a serious attack depends on what your body remembers, which depends on what level of training you've reached, or in other words the degree of usability you've achieved.

If, for example, your body is equipped to "catch" all of the information about the opponent at the moment of contact and use this to formulate a correct response on the fly, then I think you can say you have "usability." At that point you can start using bunkai kumite (step-by-step sparring) based on kata as a system for getting feedback about the usability you've achieved.
The principles I learned involve abosolute non-resistance, which is a funny thing because in order to NOT resist an actively applied force, I have to first know where it is going, so as to not conflict with it.

With that in mind my body is reaching for that flow of information to process and then act on. As Ushiro says, to "catch" all of the information about the opponent at the moment of contact is much easier when my concern is not in applying my "strength," but at first merely following whatever force pattern his attack has established and only then adapting it. That's one of the more powerful reasons we seriously practice the role of uke, and not merely the solo forms as nage.
Quote:
Tim Fong wrote:
Any technique's success or failure is based on the conditioning (strength, flexibility, cardiovascular, etc) of the practitioner, as well as her/his timing to apply the technique. The stronger you are, the better the technique works. Everyone wants timing and "smoothness" but it's not about that....no conditioning, no technique. Strength and conditioning are the foundation for everything.
Ikeda Shihan, who is pointed to as being one the chief aikidoka taking this approach discussed by Ushiro is saying precisely the opposite, that as we age our budo should get better and be the better of stronger opponents and not be contingent on our waning strength or loss of condition.
Quote:
Ikeda wrote:
The underlying principle of budo is that no matter how old one gets, one should be able to deal with a person of greater strength using the techniques and spiritual mastery one develops through training.
I know for a fact this is severely true with Hooker Sensei, and just as severly tested given his physical condition. So, no, I do not agree with your take on the points that Ushiro is making, and not just becasue I want to be contrary about it. There is a real difference in goal and training involved.
Quote:
Tim Fong wrote:
One can have all the timing in the world, and all the smoothness in the world and _still_ fail in application against resistance.
That is a logically flawed premise. It is not true if you never offer force against restance to begin with. Which is sort of my point all along in reasserting throughout this discussion O Sensei's "principle of absolute non-resistance."
Quote:
Tim Fong wrote:
Remember-- your legal training teaches you to make procrustean arguments for your client, who must, be definition be correct.
Non-lawyers always misunderstand what we do. The law is THE LAW. I do not get to change what the law is. I do not get to misrepresent or fudge it. I get to argue its application in circumstances that may not yet be factually certain or its extrapolation to novel circumstances. The "law" in this circumstance is "the principle of absolute non-resistance" and the ramifications of applying that law, rigorously and forcefully, to our practice in Aikido.
Quote:
Tim Fong wrote:
In contrast, science is empirical and biology, non-deterministic. You make a lot of bold argument-by-analogy claims about the physics of kokyu etc, yet, you have yet to show _one_ instrumented test or even a proposal for _how_ you would measure and gather the data to either support or falsify your claim.
Another key part of any scientific undertaking is reproducible results. You put out a protocol, then see if other people can reproduce the experiment.
Applied mechanics has gotten a good deal past the experimental verification stage in the last four hundred years. The only queston is the accuracy of the observed movements to which it is being applied, which no one here has seriously challenged, yet.
Quote:
Tim Fong wrote:
Funny thing-- Dan, Mike and Akuzawa (through Rob) have put out protocols which _people who have never met them_ have tried and used to develop results consistent with what the proponents claimed the protocol could develop. I wouldn't have taken Rob seriously, or bought tickets to Japan otherwise.
Then by all means carry on, and with my blessing. Metaphorical methods are very vlauable if the metaphor worls to engage things for you. These are not mutually exclusive approaches, a point I keep making and the other folks keep ignoring, apparently because to them it is a mutually exlcusive thing. That air of exclusivity is what causes me such serious concern for those early on within aikido who come ot place like this trying to learn what they need to learn. The issue of resistance also concerns me in the 'protocols' that have been given.
Quote:
Tim Fong wrote:
I want you to think really hard about what I'm going to say next. Your protocols on the other hand, have not had that kind of success, at least, from what I can see here.
No, I suppose not. Newton. Coulomb. Euler. -- Pikers.
Quote:
Tim Fong wrote:
Maybe the reports of the success of your gyrodynamic training method are simply getting lost in the chatter. That should tell you something-- either your protocol is _wrong_ or you're explaining it poorly.
There is no such thing as "my protocol," or any different training method, which if you would read what I write, you would understand. I have stated, again and again, (and somewhat vigorously defended) the validity of teaching the kihon and kokyu undo that I was taught in the progressions and the manner of attention to variations as I was taught. Mechanical observaiton is something I work on for descriptive and analytical purposes -- for evaluating and critiquing training, not for doing it.
Quote:
Tim Fong wrote:
I have a lot of friends and family who work as university or graduate level scientists and sometimes they tell me about their research and what goes on during their symposia. I can assure you that from all accounts it is sharp, highly critical, and completely unforgiving.
All of which is fair game. Misstating facts is not, which others have done when it suits their agenda.

Cordially,

Erick Mead
一隻狗可久里馬房但他也不是馬的.
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Old 02-06-2007, 01:14 AM   #402
Erick Mead
 
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Re: Baseline skillset

Quote:
Ignatius Teo wrote:
Clearly from your exposition of Ushiro's words, you don't really understand what he's REALLY saying either.
True. I simply read and understand what he actually wrote.
Quote:
Ignatius Teo wrote:
As Mike, and Dan and whoever else has said it... it's pretty clear who knows and who doesn't.
Are you all going to keep saying that until I quit laughing at it?
Quote:
Ignatius Teo wrote:
I think it was very clearly established at the beginning of this thread, that we were discussing body conditioning "how-to" to develop baseline skills. You don't seem or want to understand the importance of such conditioning, choosing instead to disavow it on the basis that it is "resistant" - according to your definition.
Since we differ on what the "baseline skills" are or are designed to allow one to do in Aikido, then we can by no means agree on the needed training or conditioning for them.

Quote:
Ignatius Teo wrote:
As I said before... if the "form" and "kata" provides the secret, then everyone practising the form and kata would be of Ueshiba's ilk. Are they?
Of course not, as Ushiro said, it will accomplish little if it becomes the mere "repetition of technique","becomes more and more superficial," and "vital aspects such as breath and ki energy become topics for study in word only."
He and I agree on that. Rigorous practice with the proper mind and heart is crucial. The internal arts parallel of "iron body" training that you all seem to be in for is not the same thing, at all.
Quote:
Ignatius Teo wrote:
BTW, this is not directed at you as an attack, but out of a genuine concern for all those who follow a path... that goes nowhere...
Oh really. You have been to the end of that path to bring back reports, have you? Ushiro is fairly clear that he has not and as he described it, is unlikely ever to be. O Sensei has been a good bit farther, and he says this is the guide to hew to. You alll have done nthign to rebut or really even to address his points, that I ahve rasied. To be perfectly blunt, mostly Mike and Dan have dismissed him as irrelevant other than for the occasional video cameo. To be frank, I would prefer the straight attack -- it makes one's positions and intentions more clear.

Cordially,

Erick Mead
一隻狗可久里馬房但他也不是馬的.
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Old 02-06-2007, 02:00 AM   #403
eyrie
 
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Re: Baseline skillset

Suit yourself Erick... and good luck with that...

Ignatius
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Old 02-06-2007, 06:24 AM   #404
Eddie deGuzman
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Re: Baseline skillset

Quote:
Erick Mead wrote:
...to be put out of your way to get to the heart of the matter.

If you are dealing with HIM then the attack does not matter.

That practice of the form with proper intent ultimately becomes the ki extension (intent/energy as Ushiro says)

Doran Sensei quoted Musashi in the introductory article to the 2006 Summer Camp as follows:"The purpose of today's training ... is to defeat yesterday's understanding." An endless and virtuous cycle.
I agree with all of this. And not bad advice in general.

I took a walk today, a kokyu walk. I looked a little strange, but it felt good.

Cheers,
Eddie
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Old 02-06-2007, 07:39 AM   #405
Mike Sigman
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Re: Baseline skillset

Quote:
Erick Mead wrote:
Neither you nor Mike are bothering to rebut me on my descriptions of what they are, and how they fit the forms of aikido as received in tradition. Ushiro's observations from a differnt stream of tradition, only confirm me to return, again and again, to the root forms where the secrets lie. And to oppose your efforts to lead others away from them, for reasons that are most unclear to me.
The reason I am not "bothering to rebut" is because you're wrong AND your analyses are too simplistic. You have complained over and over about my analyses, yet I still think that for descriptions of fairly complex movement those descriptions are more enlightening to the average reader than your focused discussions of an incomplete and simplistic explanation. That's part of it. Part of it is that to some extent, once I get past what I personally consider the foot-in-the-door stuff that most people can use to get started in the right direction, I tend to not want to go off onto the more complex tangents. It's a waste of time, in some respects, and in other respects I want to personally choose the "good guys" (in my opinion) who I want to give those head-starts to. It's a personal choice.

Of course, if someone knows enough to start a conversation about how to do more advanced things, I will be happy to join in.... stipulating that I am not claiming to be advanced, but only mediocre at best.

Regards,

Mike Sigman
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Old 02-06-2007, 07:46 AM   #406
Cady Goldfield
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Re: Baseline skillset

Until Erick gets on the mats with one of them, further talk is absurd. Just what a friend of mine calls a "masturbatory excercise." And any continued attempts to explain things to him would be such an excercise, too. Although I can understand why one might keep trying to break through to him -- if for no other reason, then to make sure that newcomers to aikido/MAs here don't see just Erick's misguided hypotheses and tacitly accept them as fact for lack of better information.

Get on the mats with one of these experienced, knowledgeable people, Erick -- Mike, Dan, Rob -- then write more about your ideas. Now -that- will make for some fascinating reading.
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Old 02-06-2007, 07:53 AM   #407
Mike Sigman
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Re: Baseline skillset

Quote:
Erick Mead wrote:
O Sensei has been a good bit farther, and he says this is the guide to hew to. You alll have done nthign to rebut or really even to address his points, that I ahve rasied. To be perfectly blunt, mostly Mike and Dan have dismissed him as irrelevant other than for the occasional video cameo.
Oh, stoppit. I haven't "dismissed" O-Sensei. In your zeal to score points you're misstating the case. Frankly, my perspective, if you'll note it from previous posts and threads, is more along the lines that what O-Sensei did, what Tohei does, what Ushiro does, what Abe does, what Inaba does, what Sunadomari does, what Akuzawa does, what Dan does, etc., etc., are all pieces from the same puzzle. None of the quotes you've used does anything more than reinforce what I just said, although you're trying to warp those quotes to mean something different.

It's all part of the same thing, Erick. That's why Ushiro's Sanchin Kata is sort of interesting to me as a facet he would offer to Aikidoists, but while I see it as having the same parentage, I'm not sure I recommend it. That's more where the discussion should be, BTW. Not in this constant insistence that your "theory" has a rightful place in a bona fide discussion of baseline skills.

Regards,

Mike Sigman
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Old 02-06-2007, 07:57 AM   #408
Mike Sigman
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Re: Baseline skillset

Quote:
Cady Goldfield wrote:
Although I can understand why one might keep trying to break through to him -- if for no other reason, then to make sure that newcomers to aikido/MAs here don't see just Erick's misguided hypotheses and tacitly accept them as fact for lack of better information.
That hit the nail precisely on the head. It's why I will sometimes continue to respond to otherwise inane posts...... newcomers don't have the information to decide what is right and a continued wrong theory or a continued denial of basic skills by one or two Yudansha can be enough to wreck the career/practice of a newcomer-student. And I've seen the sad end to some of those careers that were ruined by "teachers" who thought their own dignity and status were more important than a non-ranked beginner's right to correct teaching.

Regards,

Mike
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Old 02-06-2007, 08:29 AM   #409
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Re: Baseline skillset

Erick,

I applaud the level of thought you have put into all of your posts but I do not believe it is very helpful or accurate for you to be using Ushiro's text to argue your point when you have not felt him in person. The written page is often only meaningful with some hands on experience. This is especially true when we deal with translations. I believe Stan Pranin once said something akin to all of the English translations of O-Sensei should not be considered totally accurate in message let alone detail.

Now if you have felt Ushiro my apologies.

Regards,
Tim Anderson
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Old 02-06-2007, 08:34 AM   #410
Upyu
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Re: Baseline skillset

Quote:
Cady Goldfield wrote:
Until Erick gets on the mats with one of them, further talk is absurd.
Yawn, I'd have to agree with Cady on this.

Besides, a bunch of people have met Mike, Ark, Dan and myself, but no one's met Erick...
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Old 02-06-2007, 08:35 AM   #411
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Re: Baseline skillset

Quote:
Tim Anderson wrote:
Erick,

I applaud the level of thought you have put into all of your posts but I do not believe it is very helpful or accurate for you to be using Ushiro's text to argue your point when you have not felt him in person. The written page is often only meaningful with some hands on experience. This is especially true when we deal with translations. I believe Stan Pranin once said something akin to all of the English translations of O-Sensei should not be considered totally accurate in message let alone detail.

Now if you have felt Ushiro my apologies.

Regards,
Tim Anderson
The "no feel no quote" policy has been invoked.
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Old 02-06-2007, 09:07 AM   #412
Dennis Hooker
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Re: Baseline skillset

Quote:
Ricky Wood wrote:
The "no feel no quote" policy has been invoked.
Oh come on now, do you know what you are saying! No Buddha feel not quote! No Jesus Christ feel no quote! No Mohammed feel no quote! No Hooker feel no quote! Oh -Oh, most of you guys have probably felt a Hooker so forget the last one!!

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Old 02-06-2007, 09:30 AM   #413
Tim Fong
 
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Re: Baseline skillset

Cady,
That's good advice. I've said what I wanted to say. I'll let it go. I think a motivated beginner (like me, I'm a beginner ) can judge for herself/himself based on the dialogue so far.

Thanks.
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Old 02-06-2007, 09:40 AM   #414
Cady Goldfield
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Re: Baseline skillset

Quote:
Dennis Hooker wrote:
Oh come on now, do you know what you are saying! No Buddha feel not quote! No Jesus Christ feel no quote! No Mohammed feel no quote! No Hooker feel no quote! Oh -Oh, most of you guys have probably felt a Hooker so forget the last one!!
Sorry, Dennis, but your analogy doesn't fly (except for the Hooker one. I felt a Dennis Hooker waza once, many years ago. ). All of the above are examples of philosophical, intellectual and spiritual thought, not the concrete, tangible applied science of a physical skill set. You don't need to physically grapple with Jesus, Buddha, or Hillel for that matter, to get a sense of their spiritual and philosophical principles. And even with such intangibles, it still would help to see these teachers acting as examples of their beliefs -- being able to observe them in their daily lives to see the "living word." Who knows, maybe we are missing something we will never know from them because we didn't see these things and learn from them in the context of their flesh-and-blood daily lives and cultures.

With MAs, we're talking about the practical application of biomechanics and physical laws, which must be experienced to be understood. Not the communing of human minds and spirits, but concrete, sensory-dependent mechanics.

To try to understand these principles without feeling them in your body -- learning how to identify the sensations, effects, even the actual muscle groups (with tendons and fascia, etc.) -- you are flying blind. It would be like trying to learn to cook only from words, without ever having tasted the ingredients required or witnessing first-hand the effects of heat, water, freezing and other processes on those ingredients, or tasting the finished results.

There comes a point when words alone no longer serve.

Last edited by Cady Goldfield : 02-06-2007 at 09:53 AM.
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Old 02-06-2007, 09:42 AM   #415
Dennis Hooker
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Re: Baseline skillset

Let me say that Mike and Dan are extremely skilled and both have very good knowledge to impart. I know I have learned a few things. I do not see the need to be confrontational nor belligerent here. Yes I have ask "Why are you here?" the question was ligament and I got ligament responses that helped me form opinions. It is my belief that most posters here are truly interested in gaining and sharing knowledge. I am not very good at talking about baseline skill sets, I am more of a hands on type of guy but to those that have the communication skills to operate in this forum I say go for it. We are all better off for the effort.

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Old 02-06-2007, 09:46 AM   #416
Dennis Hooker
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Re: Baseline skillset

But Cady some people only offer words. To some on this forum the ability to lay hands on the principles involved is as unlikely as laying hands on those I mentioned.


Quote:
Cady Goldfield wrote:
Sorry, Dennis, but your analogy doesn't fly (except for the Hooker one. I felt a Dennis Hooker waza once, many years ago. ). All of the above are examples of philosophical, intellectual and spiritual thought, not the concrete, tangible applied science of a physical skill set. You don't need to physically grapple with Jesus, Buddha, or Hillel for that matter, to get a sense of their spiritual and philosophical principles. And even with such intangibles, it still would help to see these teachers acting as examples of their beliefs -- being able to observe them in their daily lives to see the "living word." Who knows, maybe we are missing something we will never know from them because we didn't see these things and learn from them in the context of their flesh-and-blood daily lives and cultures.

With MAs, we're talking about the practical application of biomechanics and physical laws, which must be experienced to be understood. Not the communing of human minds and spirits, but concrete, sensory-dependent mechanics.

To try to understand these principles without feeling them in your body -- learning how to identify the sensations, effects, even the actual muscle groups (with tendons and fascia, etc.) -- you are flying blind. It would be like trying to learn to cook only from words, without ever having tasted the ingredients required or witnessing first-hand the effects of heat, water, freezing and other processes on those ingredients, or tasting the finished results.

There comes a point when words alone no longer serve.

Dennis Hooker: (DVD) Zanshin and Ma-ai in Aikido
https://www.createspace.com/238049

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Old 02-06-2007, 09:53 AM   #417
Erick Mead
 
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Re: Baseline skillset

Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote:
The reason I am not "bothering to rebut" is because you're wrong AND your analyses are too simplistic. ... It's a waste of time, in some respects, and in other respects I want to personally choose the "good guys" (in my opinion) who I want to give those head-starts to. It's a personal choice.
Well, that settles me then. Mike, Dan and Ignatius say I am wrong -- and who can argue with that?

I have just wanted to see if you all could come up with any useful rebuttal or not. You have answered my question, thoroughly.

Of course, if you set the terms of debate then no one can challenge you. I get it. That's why I like neutral ground for an honest engagement on the merits. You know -- like physics that has been around for, well, three hundred thirty years since the publication of Principia. Not novel "protocols" in the least. Maybe not the lengthy pedigree of Taoist knowledge of jin, but not too shabby either. Last I heard, the Taoist masters did not make it to the Moon, so maybe there might be something to this newly-minted mechanics stuff. Maybe it's too early to tell?

And as for my being "off-base" on my thoughts of shifting centers of action, this cropped up in an earlier discussion of the vaunted "jo trick" discussion, that I thought would be worth requoting:
Quote:
But I've seen Sensei Baker at Norfolk Virginia Aikikai doing a similar technique against 3 ukes. His explanation is that he pretends like the jo is twice as long and the pivot point is not at his hands, but at the end of the jo. By pivoting around that point everyone is on the same side of the jo as he is and he claims it's really easy.
http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showpo...&postcount=139That is not a far cry from the moment mechanics I diagrammed for you above. Now, I have never met Jim Baker, but I find it interesting that his description and mine of what goes on in kokyu action, even in the vaunted "jo trick" are pretty much spot-on.

His attitude about training and the world, which I have read in his own words, is, strangely enough a lot more of what I have come to expect from those who practice Aikido in the tradition as it has been given -- as it is as opposed to those of you who are so disaffected with it as a "dead-end" road and want to lead people, like those who come here, away from it.

I hear one of Baker Sensei's companion instructors, AaaRk Sensei, has trained with my old teacher, Hooker. Maybe he has a few pointers for "bounce jin" on ice.

FWIW.

Cordially,

Erick Mead
一隻狗可久里馬房但他也不是馬的.
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Old 02-06-2007, 10:14 AM   #418
Mike Sigman
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Re: Baseline skillset

Quote:
Erick Mead wrote:
Now, I have never met Jim Baker, but I find it interesting that his description and mine of what goes on in kokyu action, even in the vaunted "jo trick" are pretty much spot-on.

His attitude about training and the world, which I have read in his own words, is, strangely enough a lot more of what I have come to expect from those who practice Aikido in the tradition as it has been given -- as it is as opposed to those of you who are so disaffected with it as a "dead-end" road and want to lead people, like those who come here, away from it.
You're still under the general impression that your simple physics must be covering the ground, but it doesn't. The actions are more complex than you're making them. I can't mathematically model everything that is going on, so I'm fairly safe in assuming you can't either, based on what I've seen of math displays. I.e., the modelling would be too sophisticated, given the number of factors involved, so your calls for more rigorous description are more of an indicator that you don't see the principles and hence you don't see the problems with your desired approach.

The best suggestion I can give you, once again, is that you meet up with someone that can show you. As a further suggestion, don't do what I've seen from a great number of teachers in other arts... they go looking only for justification that what they already know is the end-all... and sure enough, what they already know becomes their end-all.

Regards,

Mike Sigman
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Old 02-06-2007, 10:24 AM   #419
Dennis Hooker
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Re: Baseline skillset

I do believe that Aikido is complete in and of its' self and is lacking nothing with the right instruction. Now I have been labeled by Dan and others as "a true believer" mea culpa mea culpa, mea culpa. That is not to say I do not believe there is value in other training as I obviously do because I train in other things. Many of the lessons within Aikido transcend the labeling and when presented from other viewpoints can at times flip the cognitive switch. Everyone here that presents a good argument for their standpoint has a right to do so. I don't like to see it get personal but then who am I but another voice in the wilderness.

Last edited by Dennis Hooker : 02-06-2007 at 10:38 AM.

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Old 02-06-2007, 10:31 AM   #420
Dennis Hooker
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Re: Baseline skillset

Quote:
Erick Mead wrote:
Well, that settles me then.
I hear one of Baker Sensei's companion instructors, AaaRk Sensei, has trained with my old teacher, Hooker. Maybe he has a few pointers for "bounce jin" on ice.

FWIW.
Erick what are you talking about? Who or what is AaaRK Sensei? Jim Baker has attended my seminars as well. A very nice fellow and good teacher. I am slow but I do not know what is being said here. Do you still train under Frank Calhoun and/or at the Pensacola dojo? I am sorry but I have been gone from there for 22 years and have not been back for at least 5.

Dennis

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Old 02-06-2007, 10:39 AM   #421
Erick Mead
 
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Re: Baseline skillset

Quote:
Cady Goldfield wrote:
With MAs, we're talking about the practical application of biomechanics and physical laws, which must be experienced to be understood. Not the communing of human minds and spirits, but concrete, sensory-dependent mechanics.
A simple question then. If this is so, why the resistance to use the language that addresses these things in the most culturally neutral way possible? I value the traditional Chinese and Japanese views of the world. Heck, I got a degree in it. But, the Chinese also shoot satellites out of orbit now. I have an idea or two about what concepts they used to do that, and that the average high school physics class can graps them without grave difficulty.
Quote:
Cady Goldfield wrote:
To try to understand these principles without feeling them in your body -- learning how to identify the sensations, effects, even the actual muscle groups (with tendons and fascia, etc.) -- you are flying blind.
Amen, and amen. Who said lack of awarenesswas a basis for anything? Not me. One can argue about the approriate level of detail down to "muscle groups" being useful or not.
Quote:
Cady Goldfield wrote:
There comes a point when words alone no longer serve.
If that were really true then this thread would be utterly blank.

What is the reason for the resistance to this approach to proper mechanical description and analysis of what is felt and what is done? Say I am wrong all they want, but show the goods and argue the darn point. Toss me with it if I am indeed so gravely mistaken or so lacking in reality-based comprehension. Saying it does not make it so. It ought not be too hard if they are right and I am wrong. Caustically dismissing a legitimately framed issue only causes further doubt as to the substance of the contrary position. When three guys respectively answer the same question, "No." "No." and "Hell, No!" the short money says the third one's hiding something.

Hide the ball tactics after a while looks like mere shiftiness, which, duly acknowledging Hooker Sensei's regard for what these guys actually do (as I have previously acknowledge Ledyard Sensei's similar comment), only demeans their ideas and the very skills they are advocating in the eyes of those who have not met or dealt with them except here. Improve your image a little and try to make me look bad on the merits.

Answer up. It doesn't hurt. Really. I've never broken anything in Net ukemi yet. You might even learn something in the course of knocking my ideas into the shattered pieces they apparently deserve. But you have to connect with me first. There is no substitute for musubi.

Cordially,

Erick Mead
一隻狗可久里馬房但他也不是馬的.
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Old 02-06-2007, 10:44 AM   #422
Ron Tisdale
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Re: Baseline skillset

Quote:
only demeans their ideas and the very skills they are advocating in the eyes of those who have not met or dealt with them except here.
Uh, speak for yourself. I have not met them (yet), but I find a great deal of value in their approach and descriptions. I'm afraid less so, for yours...but that might be my own laziness, so feel free to ignore that.

Best,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
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Old 02-06-2007, 11:11 AM   #423
Dennis Hooker
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Re: Baseline skillset

AaaRK !! OK I just got it. Where did this come from. I am sure I would have remembered this fellow.

http://home.earthlink.net/~jimbaker6/aa/aaark.htm

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Old 02-06-2007, 01:12 PM   #424
Erick Mead
 
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Re: Baseline skillset

Quote:
Dennis Hooker wrote:
Do you still train under Frank Calhoun and/or at the Pensacola dojo? I am sorry but I have been gone from there for 22 years and have not been back for at least 5.
You were my foundation in Aikido. I won't say much for the superstructure added since then but I still think the underpinnings are pretty sound. Frank was a yellow belt then when I started Aikido at UWF in ~ '83 - '85. (Yes, you had colored belts then. shudder.) Your son was 1st Kyu at the time. I'd been a wanderer since, in college, the Navy, law school, mostly on the West Coast (San Diego) or deployment until coming back home about ten years ago.

I saw you last in Tallahassee, before the fire. I am fairly unremarkable. You, on the other hand, always make something of an impression.

Well ... dent, really.

Last edited by Erick Mead : 02-06-2007 at 01:15 PM.

Cordially,

Erick Mead
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Old 02-06-2007, 01:16 PM   #425
Dennis Hooker
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Re: Baseline skillset

Eric I tried sending you a private message and it came back. I will be in Tallahassee in June. Any chance we can get together?

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