Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > General

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 09-10-2001, 07:31 PM   #1
guest1234
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 915
Offline
Where have those hands been?

While it was meant as a joke on the 95-5 thread, I would like to take this opportunity to mention why semapi or kohai of questionable hygiene or smelling of smoke (legal or otherwise) or strong perfume may not get partners. This is not prejudice, it is self-protection.

Those things literally make many sick, and anyone who shows up on the mat needing to wash their gi/hakam/other body parts is showing massive disrespect to their classmates. The same can be said for those I see sneeze into their hand and then grab my wrist, or those to whom I've pointed out bleeding wounds and they say 'oh, it's not that bad' and refuse to bandage it. For goodness sake, excuse yourself, go wash your hands, cover the wound, whatever.

As we leave summer and approach the cold and flu season, I would like to remind one and all to wash their hands/gis. And perhaps consider watching rather than training if ill.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2001, 07:41 PM   #2
lt-rentaroo
Join Date: Jul 2000
Posts: 237
Offline
I second what Colleen has said! The sneezing thing really bugs me, and this is something to be especially aware of during children's classes. The first aid kit I keep in the dojo for emergencies is stocked with alcohol pads (work great for sneezy hands) and starting tomorrow will contain a new bottle of water-less hand cleanser. Bleeding wounds are an even more serious matter, no matter how small they may appear. OK, done ranting. Happy Training!

LOUIS A. SHARPE, JR.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2001, 10:25 PM   #3
guest1234
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 915
Offline
Oh! An enlightened soul that would not need beating into submission to wash his hands while deployed to tent city, and you managed to work the core values into an earlier post. Most impressive

Now why are those so hard to find when I'm in the field?
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2001, 08:50 AM   #4
lt-rentaroo
Join Date: Jul 2000
Posts: 237
Offline
Colleen,

I figured out of all the people who post here that you would be the only one to catch the core values reference

What can I say, I'm USAF all the way!

LOUIS A. SHARPE, JR.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2001, 01:09 PM   #5
MikeE
 
MikeE's Avatar
Dojo: Midwest Center For Movement & Aikido Bukou Dojos
Location: Hudson, WI
Join Date: Jul 2000
Posts: 407
Offline
Okay, you two! Get a room.

(Just Kidding)

Mike Ellefson
Midwest Center
For Movement &
Aikido Bukou
Dojos
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2001, 01:41 PM   #6
aikifish
Dojo: North Bay Aikido
Location: Santa Cruz
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 12
Offline
Smile

Hey all!

I thought I'd mention that we often rub our feet during warm ups and since I live in a beach town where sandals and thongs are very popular, I always appreciate those who take extra care to clean their feet before getting on the mat.

A.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2001, 01:48 PM   #7
Mona
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 52
Offline
Perhaps we should also mention those who 'forget' to shower AFTER class!
Now THAT I find disgusting beyond words!
I'm sure this does not do good to their image as aikidokas.

In Aiki,
Mona

"A true warrior is always armed with three things: the radiant sword of pacification; the mirror of bravery, wisdom, and friendship; and the precious jewel of enlightenment." ~ O'Sensei
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2001, 06:35 PM   #8
guest1234
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 915
Offline
Hey, I'm happy just for hand (and if needed, foot) washing before class...I'm not touching them after class, and besides, I usually walk the five bloocks to my house after class for a shower (being the one who cleans the bathrooms in the dojo, I know which shower I prefer...

Oh, and gi's
Please also wash those gi's
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2001, 06:08 AM   #9
petra
Dojo: samourais,Eindhoven
Location: the Netherlands
Join Date: Dec 2000
Posts: 31
Offline
Well, not everyone is as fortunate to have their home and dojo close to one another. For those less fortunate (like me) I can recommend bath-slippers and 2 plastic bags (to keep your cloths, towels, etc. dry). That has served me well in some realy gross showers.
What drives me up the walls however, is the fact that although people tend to put bandages on there bleeding toe, finger whatever, they 'forget' to clean the dojo-mat they have been bleeding on. Very 'nice' if you have to do ukemi there afterwards.

Petra

I haven't failed, I have found 10.000 ways that won't work.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2001, 07:34 AM   #10
guest1234
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 915
Offline
Also nice if you have a shower, the majority of dojo's I've been to do not,,,but in any case, it is much more important to be clean before you will be touching others than after you are done (with the exception of washing your hands, which should be done right after class). Again, I am not trying to dictate people's personal attitude toward showers, but show what is important to reduce the spread of illness.

Along those lines, cleaning up spilled blood is vital. It is disrespectful if students do not clean the dojo, but it can be a very serious health risk if spilled blood is ignored, and I would consider a sensei/dojo that allowed an attitude like that to be flirting with liability.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2001, 09:28 AM   #11
petra
Dojo: samourais,Eindhoven
Location: the Netherlands
Join Date: Dec 2000
Posts: 31
Offline
Realy? I've never been to a dojo that has no showers, some were primitive but still. And of course people should be 'clean' before stepping on the mat. We practise usualy very intense and believe me, a shower afterwards is not a luxury, nor is washing your gi after training.
The spilled blood thing is a problem though, the dojo we use is a multipurpose one if I may say so. It is used for karate, judo, kobudo, self-defense, aikido and sometimes fitness, streetdance or whatever the current health/fitness hype is. We have classes late at night so we cannot control what happens in the classes before us. According to the university, which owns the dojo, it is cleaned every morning and twice a week treated with anti-sceptic fluid. I don't believe that they realy do that, it is cleaned maybe once or twice a week and the fluid is used maybe once in a month or so. The only thing we can do is tell our teacher, subsequently he tells the care-taker and he gives the message to the cleaners. Our teacher complains regularly, but when it was realy bad, so did we, the student. Next thing we know, the care-takers boss tells my teacher that his students should not complain to the care-taker, since our teacher is the contact and everything has to go through him. So we are back at complaining to our own teacher about something he can do very little about himself. By the way, classes are scheduled pretty tight and we do not have the opportunity, nor means, to clean the dojo before aikido class.
Liability is not a realy big issue in the Netherlands and sofar I haven't heard of anyone contracting an illness, except athelete's foot but I don't think there is a dojo in the world that has no problems with that 'illness'. We try best we can with our own limitted means and at least to have our own fellow students become conscious of the issues and problems discussed here sofar.

Petra

I haven't failed, I have found 10.000 ways that won't work.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2001, 03:59 PM   #12
Mona
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 52
Offline
Quote:
Originally posted by ca

Please also wash those gi's
Speaking of which, is it true that we shouldn't wash our obi? Apparently, since it's directly tied around the hara, it represents the center of our ki, so washing it would be like washing off our own energy.
Hehehe, does this mean that yudansha actually never 'recieved' their black belt, but it was their white one that turned black after consistent...well, contact with the tatami?
Just a silly thought...


Mona

Last edited by Mona : 09-12-2001 at 04:03 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2001, 04:08 PM   #13
Jim23
Join Date: Jan 2001
Posts: 482
Offline
And no chilli before class ... please!!

Jim23

Remember, all generalizations are false
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2001, 07:35 PM   #14
Bill D
Location: Los Angeles
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 17
Offline
Off the subject, but to Mona,

It may have seemed like a silly thought, but I have actually heard from a sort-of reliable source that that is exactly where the black-belt tradition came from. Supposedly in the good old days people would train at whatever martial art there was in the good old days, outdoors, and would never wash their obi, which would lead to a color progression like you still see in some childrens' classes: white, yellow, orange, brown, and finally black (I can't explain blue or purple). So you would know a real experienced person by how dark his belt had become.

BTW I washed my white belt for years and was never reprimanded for it.

  Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2001, 08:32 PM   #15
guest1234
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 915
Offline
Well, those of you observing the no-washing-the-obi tradition, please wash your hands after tieing it

One way we coped with the 'shared' room at my university club was the understanding that the first student into the room would wash the mat (wrestling type, would be more difficult with canvas but I assume your 'shared' mat is also synthetic). S/he would spray the mat and a large bath towel with disinfectant, put the towel over the end of a push broom, and starting in one corner cross back and forth across the mat. This goes fairly quickly, dried quickly, and also picked up a fair amount of dirt that before was getting on our gis/hakamas.

In the US, a fair number of dojos exist in 'strip malls' or church halls/basements. I've never seen one without a sink, but showers are often not part of the building--makes you really appreciate it when you find a dojo with showers!
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2001, 10:01 PM   #16
akiy
 
akiy's Avatar
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 5,942
Offline
Quote:
Originally posted by Bill D
It may have seemed like a silly thought, but I have actually heard from a sort-of reliable source that that is exactly where the black-belt tradition came from.
You might want to read section #15 of the following rec.martial-arts Groaner FAQ entitled, "The belt system colours are like that because as a white belt gets dirtier..."

http://www.cs.uu.nl/wais/html/na-dir...faq/part4.html

-- Jun

Please help support AikiWeb -- become an AikiWeb Contributing Member!
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2001, 04:28 PM   #17
Bill D
Location: Los Angeles
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 17
Offline
I stand embarrassingly corrected.

I'll be sure to pass that on to my no-longer-reliable source.

  Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2001, 03:58 AM   #18
mariko nakamura
Dojo: Dobunkan Japan
Location: Toyama Japan
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 25
Offline
I wonder what would happen if any of you came to our dojo.... Stinky...Dirty..Bloody..
I dont think I know when the last time any of us cleaned our hakamas although we do occasionally wipe the tatami.
come on! youll love it!
Mick

Mick
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2001, 11:43 PM   #19
LiquidZero
Dojo: Arlington Aikikai, Arlington Heights, IL
Location: Chicago
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 14
Offline
Ouch. That's harsh. My sensei is all about cleanliness. Instead of sweeping, he makes us scrub the mat... with toothbrushes (Sensei, if you're reading this, it's just a joke, please don't make me clean the mat with a toothbrush! )
  Reply With Quote

Please visit our sponsor:

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!



Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
sticky hands, push hands and kokyu-ho reyne caritativo General 2 03-09-2006 09:50 AM
Standing Postures in Aikido? Mike Sigman General 106 03-30-2005 07:41 PM
Systema Seminar with Vladimir Vasiliev, Part 1 aikibaka131 Seminars 2 07-22-2003 01:45 PM
Hands as weapons Bruce Baker Weapons 12 10-15-2002 10:21 AM
Apindages (hands and feet) Veers General 3 09-23-2002 01:36 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:22 AM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2016 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2016 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate