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Old 12-15-2006, 12:26 PM   #101
Erick Mead
 
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Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

Quote:
Ted Ehara wrote:
While I can see how one can argue that aikido is not a martial art, I like my sensei's statement that aikido is a martial art and more. It's the more that confuses us.
Besides:
Quote:
Kanshu Sunadomari wrote:
"This budo is both martial art and religious faith."
The founder of Aikido, Morihei Ueshiba, spoke these words directly to me in 1942, when I was his live-in apprentice [uchideshi].
Preface pg. XXIII "Enlightenment through Aikido"
His English translator went on to explain:
Reverend Andrew Ellis wrote:
A phrase often repeated throughout the text is,"Aikido is both a martial art and a religious faith," which is what the Founder stressed. ... The meaning is not that Aikido is another religion like the great religions of the world or the strange cults that often spring up from them. It is a religious faith. It is not a dogma or a set of beliefs or a form of worship. It is an all-encompassing belief in the victory of love and a harmony that unites our hearts with the loving heart of the universe. Call it god, or karma, or whatever, but it is living and continually challenges us to face up to the evil in the world and to do our best to help the good win.
Now see, I am a very traditional Catholic with strong background in East Asian thought. I have no problem with a bit of that. Nor does the Church, other than a side comment on the fullness of the revelation of truth. What is the confusion?

Cordially,

Erick Mead
一隻狗可久里馬房但他也不是馬的.
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Old 12-15-2006, 12:34 PM   #102
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Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote:
Why be so negative on what he's saying, Erick?
I am not negative, I am just reflecting the negativity in his own statements and observing a concern.
Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote:
Why not go look for yourself. A man of your prestige and ability should have no trouble in flitting up to Massachusetts, Japan, etc.
I am too busy trying to overcome all of that. The flitting part, too. One day, I hope to be stupid enough to be a sage ..

Cordially,

Erick Mead
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Old 12-15-2006, 01:06 PM   #103
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Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

Quote:
Erick Mead wrote:
Quote:
Mark Murray wrote:
Catching air.
Now THERE is a succinct image, in every sense, of what ki and kokyu are ALL about!
Erick,
That phrase can mean many things in the world of aikido. The feeling of being uke where tori executes a technique and you feel nothing, the feeling of being tori where you execute a technique and it's like an ethereal feel, being uke for "air time" where you get a roller coaster like rush, etc, etc.

Which did you interpret it as?

Quote:
Erick Mead wrote:
Now you have also summarized the problem. What Dan, Mike, Rob and others in their circle are talking about, by your own admission is not additive within aikido, it is substituting for something else that aikido training provides. Your own language sets apart what they are showing you as something heavier, duller, less vibrant than ki and kokyu as you have experinced aikido . And yet you all seek after it.
I made a post many posts ago about putting things into what you read online. Nowhere did I say what I felt as the "replacement" was heavier, duller, or less vibrant. Perhaps I didn't explain myself properly. Let me paste my words:

Quote:
Mark Murray wrote:
I remember a time when I loved that rush. I still do, to a point. But, after experiencing a little internal "stuff" from Dan, I can actually see where that would go away. Not the fun or vibrant part, but rather something else would replace the fun and vibrant part.
To detail that a bit more. The fun or vibrant part does not go away. Let me repeat that -- the fun or vibrant part does not go away. The replacement aspect doesn't make the fun and vibrant part go away. It -- as in the "catching air" is replaced by the internal stuff. The fun or vibrant part does not go away. I can't stress that enough.

What goes away, is the aspect of "catching air" in that I wouldn't nearly take as many "breakfalls" once I learned the internal skills. And if you think that's wrong, then explain why most shihan don't take breakfalls anymore. For some reason, they too, have gone away from taking them. For me, I found a reason and can understand it.

And, IMO, what Rob, Dan, Mike, etc are talking about is what *should* be in Aikido. I would imagine that in some places, it *is* in Aikido (for example Ikeda sensei). I'd guess that those places are very rare. And the training to get there is very long. Again, IMO.

Quote:
Erick Mead wrote:
That is, in my mind, a real danger in blurring what aikido is and is not. Your own words express a sense of real loss in the effort you all are undertaking to gain somethng else -- for the purpose, I might add, of also reliving the rush of a new experience in what they are teaching.
Well, I posted a few posts ago about whatever you are putting into words on a screen comes 100%, entirely, every time, without fail from your own self. So, let me put this as clearly as I can, Erick. I have *no* sense of loss. I'm not reliving the "rush" of a new experience. You don't understand but you won't admit that.

Quote:
Erick Mead wrote:
In maturing into any art, or skill, or relationship, or faith even, the "rush" is an ephemeral thing that is often lost early on.
SNIP content

Quote:
Erick Mead wrote:
already, is the proper response in budo, as it is in love, as in faith, as in craft and all other meaningful human effort.
Sorry, Erick. If you were trying to be wise, I didn't get it. Either it doesn't apply or I'm too thick headed to understand -- or something in between. Whichever, it was lost on me.

Mark
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Old 12-15-2006, 01:17 PM   #104
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Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

Quote:
Erick Mead wrote:
I am not negative, I am just reflecting the negativity in his own statements and observing a concern.
This is the last I'll say on this because it's getting too off topic.

Everything, 100%, all, every, without fail, no exception, each and every time, etc, etc, that one reads of words on a screen and then applies any emotion (and that includes positivity and negativity) to them -- said emotion is generated from oneself and not from the poster of the words. That is a truth, a fact, a law, whatever. There is only a self translation (not primarily felt) of on-screen pixel content into logic and/or emotion which in turn brings about self logic and/or emotion. If there is reflectivity, then it is brought about by reflecting upon the former self translation, which is really only self reflecting self. Kind of funny, really.

Mark
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Old 12-15-2006, 01:47 PM   #105
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Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

Eric
I'd only echo the comments you are getting here and in that other thread from Mike. Get out and feel this stuff. I pretty much think your wrong (all do respect) on two counts:
1. That it has nothing to do with aikido
2, That you even know what it is we're talking about to say it is not relevant in the first place.

I can tell you I've not met the man, (*note* hundreds of people) who has not felt this and didn't say it was anything but extremenly useful.
As for AIkido? What I said to Mark and Rob and two other Aikido guys now training here is "Do whatever you want. I'll stop you and I won't do a single thing to hurt you nor will I do a technique."
"All your efforts will just be meangingless."

Where does that leave us? Hmm.....Lets think.... Stop an attack without causng harm. Hmmm.....where have I heard that?

It is the very essence of the spirit of Aikido.....and boundless in expression.

And as we have stated over and over its in a lot of places- in whole or in part. I am playing with a group of CMA'ers twice next week. Just exploring and having fun.
I told them to bring slide rules, chaulk boards, measuring devices, and laser pointers. Otherwise they'de be hopelessly lost to get it and explain it.

Cheers
Dan

Last edited by DH : 12-15-2006 at 01:50 PM.
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Old 12-15-2006, 02:11 PM   #106
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Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

It may well be I'm too small to swim in this pond. However, I can not be at odds with Dan Harden anymore. Whatever he Says on this forum does not mean as much as his offer to share what he has learned. This seems very sincere to me, and that is enough.

FWIW - just being involved in this discussion has helped me face my pain and myself. I can't seem to be motivated without an emotional element. This discussion, this fight has helped me. Thanks.

David
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Old 12-15-2006, 03:04 PM   #107
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Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

Erick, you misunderstood what I said. It was obviously perfectly clear to others, so I'm not going to argue with you about it. I do however, feel just a bit sorry for you. It's a shame that someone so intelligent is so stuck on what they believe that they won't reach outside to try something before they dismiss it. It's a shame that this forces you to denigrate my words with your interpretation.

But no worries...we'll all survive it.

If I have mis-interpreted what you said, please forgive.

Best,
Ron

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Old 12-15-2006, 05:12 PM   #108
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Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

Quote:
Mark Murray wrote:
Everything, 100%, all, every, without fail, no exception, each and every time, etc, etc, that one reads of words on a screen and then applies any emotion (and that includes positivity and negativity) to them -- said emotion is generated from oneself and not from the poster of the words.
Homer, Li Bo, Issa, Dickinson, Poe and few million other poets around the world would disagree. Or maybe the "wine-dark sea" just means a vat of merlot. And how in the world do any of them get translated for heaven's sake?

Ob-topic -- O Sensei defines the boundary of Aikido for me. And how could he not?

When I ask why things he said straightforwardly, such as, "No resistance" are not problematic in terms of aikido for your enterpirse in training to channel ground reaction to oppose forces, I get no square answer, or get backlhanded insults intimating that I am an idiot, a stubborn sulking mudhen, or with dark intimations of my personal unworthiness from unidentified "people who know me." Nobody is running for public office here, so let's try to keep the discourse to at least a third grade emotional level.

When I ask that someone of the non-aikidoka or ex-aikidoka advocating this proposal of missing "skils" in Aikido to speak on objective terms -- there are no answers, and no rebuttals in-kind on the objective proposals I put forward (David Knowlton excluded).

When I comment on the conflicted tone of language I read here, then the form, tone and emotive content of the language does not mean anything. Sorry, but it does. Unless, of course, Mike means to say that I am very much on the right track when he says I don't know what I talking about. People communicate far more than the denotative meaning of their words. Mike communicates far more than most in that regard. I'd love to play poker with him.

O Sensei used this poetic mode almost to a fault, even when he was lecturing. There is no way to enter meaningfully into his conceptions expressed in that way without addressing the emotional and cultural signals (i.e- non-rational content) of the imagery and figures that he uses. Rationality is an exceedingly fine tool, but has limits as with everything else. By your token he has nothing to tell me in what he said or wrote that I do not tell myself, and that is just plain wrong. Much of what he said can be applied rationally when put into the scientific context he did not himself have, but which he specifically advocated attempting.

Meaning is meaning, however it is expressed, and words have both shape and color in their use. If you doubt this, try a few choice colorful expressions the next time a cop pulls you over, and see if he agrees that he is "merely reflecting his own anger back at himself", as he braces you against the vehicle.

Maybe I misread Ron's intent, maybe Mark's also, but you need to read what you wrote, the words you chose and think about what it says to an reader in terms of this topic and aikido.

Meaning is not a mirror funhouse. Words are not divorced from actions, they are merely actions by other means and have consequences like any action. When there is conflict in the shape or color of language (which I put my finger on in this case), conflict between language and action, or conflict betwen actions, internal or external, openings and vulnerabilities are created, whether you see them, or not.

The immediacy and strength of the emotional reaction only tends to prove my point. Welcome to Cross-Examination 101.

I really enjoy practice, I enjoy what my training has brought me and it expands in front of me every day, and I try to share that modicum of insight I gain as it comes to me, prepared to be chastened all the way. If I did not take you guys seriously, I would not bother here.

Whether I should take you seriously as a boon or as a bane to the practice of aikido is the part I am TRYING to get you to articulate in ways that this forum will allow.

Cordially,

Erick Mead
一隻狗可久里馬房但他也不是馬的.
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Old 12-15-2006, 05:30 PM   #109
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Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

Quote:
Dan Harden wrote:
I'd only echo the comments you are getting here and in that other thread from Mike. Get out and feel this stuff.
I pretty much think your wrong (all do respect) on two counts:
1. That it has nothing to do with aikido
2, That you even know what it is we're talking about to say it is not relevant in the first place.
Why should I assume that what you say has value over what I know, any more than you should take what I say in preference to what you know? Ths is the eternal trap of subjective knowledge. Evaluating these things is aprt of what this forum is about. Objective mechanics is the plainest, most neutral common ground on these issues in a forum such as this.

Quote:
Dan Harden wrote:
"Do whatever you want. I'll stop you and I won't do a single thing to hurt you nor will I do a technique."
"All your efforts will just be meangingless."
Where does that leave us? Hmm.....Lets think.... Stop an attack without causng harm. Hmmm.....where have I heard that?
It is the very essence of the spirit of Aikido.....and boundless in expression.
No. I have already said the issue of resistance is problematic. That pradigm described above does not bring harmony, in the sense of katsu hayabi, which destroys all thought of further attack, but merely raises frustration to the attacker. That is the tone of these discussions continually, toying and baiting. Which is the road to escalation and the opposite of what Aikido is about.

You will say it is merely a training exercise, but that is the point -- you do what you train to do.

Persuade me different. That's what this place is for.

Cordially,

Erick Mead
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Old 12-15-2006, 07:47 PM   #110
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Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

I remember reading a statement by Ueshiba M. where he indicated that anything that is forced is not Aikido. If one interprets this to mean that anywhere there is resistance there is not Aikido then Aikido simply cannot exist in the physical world.

For me to stand there must be resistance within my own musculoskeletal structure. If there were no resistance within my own muscles to maintain an erect posture then I would collapse and remain at rest in a way that balances the pull of gravity with the upward impetus of my body. However for blood to flow back up to my heart and circulate there would need to be capillary action that would resist the pull of gravity that would cause my blood to pool in the lower regions of my anatomy.

How exactly am I to now redirect the energies of conflict towards a peaceful resolution if I can't even stand up?

Personally I think the concept of having absolutely no resistance in Aikido is a gross misinterpretation of Ueshiba M.'s teachings by those who attempt to over analyze.

Reminds me of the movie Forrest Gump when he gathered a following of seekers when he started running across the USA. When asked by the media why he was running he said "I just felt like running." Sometimes when we try to prove too much we in fact prove nothing.

Gambatte.

Last edited by L. Camejo : 12-15-2006 at 07:50 PM.

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Old 12-15-2006, 09:09 PM   #111
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Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

Quote:
Larry Camejo wrote:
I remember reading a statement by Ueshiba M. where he indicated that anything that is forced is not Aikido.
Quote:
O Sensei wrote:
We adhere to the principle of absolute nonresistance, that is to say, we do not oppose the attacker.

http://www.aikidofaq.com/interviews.html
Quote:
Larry Camejo wrote:
If one interprets this to mean that anywhere there is resistance there is not Aikido then Aikido simply cannot exist in the physical world.
His actual statement cannot be interpreted that way. It is therefore a straw argument.
Quote:
Larry Camejo wrote:
Personally I think the concept of having absolutely no resistance in Aikido is a gross misinterpretation of Ueshiba M.'s teachings by those who attempt to over analyze.
Yes. Misinterpretation. "We do not oppose the attacker."

Cordially,

Erick Mead
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Old 12-15-2006, 10:43 PM   #112
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Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

Whatever Erick.

This is not the same thing that you were saying regarding internal resistance on another thread.

In Aikido we do not resist the attacker I totally agree.

Hope you find the answers you are looking for.

Gambatte.

Last edited by L. Camejo : 12-15-2006 at 10:45 PM.

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Old 12-15-2006, 11:22 PM   #113
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Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

Quote:
Larry Camejo wrote:
This is not the same thing that you were saying regarding internal resistance on another thread.
I used the same exact quote. to make the same point. Aiki has lots of force, just no resistance. All force used should be blended perpendicular to the attacking force. Then there is
1) No resistance (perpendicular component does not diminsh the energy of the attack),
2) No (counter)attack (striking block)
3) Connection, and
4) Control

Cordially,

Erick Mead
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Old 12-16-2006, 12:37 PM   #114
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Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

I started a thread in the open forums regarding models of human structure - that way that topic can be argued, and this more philosophical thread can go on unhindered.

To that end: Erick Mead said:
Quote:
I'll start with O Sensei as an indisputable foundation and work outward contingently on any reasoned disputes that arise from that point.
Erick, this statement is quite disputable - anything you read that OSensei wrote is thrice removed from reality:

He experienced what he experienced - then

1. he had to think about it
2. he had to write what he thought about
3. what he had thought about and written about had to be translated into English

I think I offended Ledyard Sensei with a line of thought, but I'll continue in the spirit of inquiry - (my wife warns me I pick fights both because I like to fight, and because I have trouble with authority. she is correct).

Sensei Ledyard, I apologize if my tone was insulting. I am a student in earnest of the truth. I honor your service to aikido and to we students who follow after you.

To continue:
If 'OSensei' is the boundary of your aikido then I think you dishonor his legacy. To proceed I must hold my lamp before me - to light my way. If I hold my lamp behind me - I will cast a shadow over my path. To truly embrace OSensei's legacy - we must let go of him as a person.

Can we not pick a few basic tenets of his, and proceed from there? I have a personal commitment to nonviolence. It has cost me, but I consider OSensei's training a continuation of the basic training in this idea I received from my Sensei in judo. Every tenkan I do is a life I spare. Every irimi I do and do not kill - I spare a life, and save myself from prison - a decision I made in the real world at least once.

This is what his legacy means to me - not embodied in he, but alive in me, and carrying on the great man's ideas in my (woefully inadequate) training, and my life.

david
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Old 12-16-2006, 12:59 PM   #115
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Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

Quote:
David Knowlton wrote:
Erick, this statement is quite disputable - anything you read that OSensei wrote is thrice removed from reality:

He experienced what he experienced - then

1. he had to think about it
2. he had to write what he thought about
3. what he had thought about and written about had to be translated into English
Another problem with it is verifying that he actually said it! I've heard from more than one source that many of the doka (for example) were written by Kishomaru as "things OSensei might have said."

Another reason I prefer to look at his deeds over 'his' words.

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Old 12-16-2006, 01:19 PM   #116
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Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

Quote:
David Knowlton wrote:
Quote:
Erick Mead wrote:
I'll start with O Sensei as an indisputable foundation and work outward contingently on any reasoned disputes that arise from that point.
Erick, this statement is quite disputable - anything you read that OSensei wrote is thrice removed from reality:

He experienced what he experienced - then

1. he had to think about it
2. he had to write what he thought about
3. what he had thought about and written about had to be translated into English
Noise. All communication has noise. That does not mean there is no signal. Creative uses of noise can even clarify a signal.
Quote:
David Knowlton wrote:
If 'OSensei' is the boundary of your aikido then I think you dishonor his legacy.
Who said the boundary is static? Dynamic boundaries are among the most critical and dangerously useful that exist - like the boundary of oil and water, the membranes of your cells, the surface of water in air the boundary layer of air over a lifting wing.

It wasn't static while he was alive, why should it be now that he is dead? That does not mean that the boundary has no meaning or is purely arbitrary. It is real -- and just as critical. His priniciples are coherent, from within his interpretive structure. Working to bring them out in our idiom is the harder part. If Japanese or Chinese poetry can be translated, so can he ...
Quote:
David Knowlton wrote:
Can we not pick a few basic tenets of his, and proceed from there? I have a personal commitment to nonviolence.
"Too many notes, Mozart. Cut a few and it will be perfect." said the Emperor.

"Which few did you have in mind, Majesty" said Mozart.

Cordially,

Erick Mead
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Old 12-16-2006, 01:29 PM   #117
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Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

No progress fallacy brother. You must do better!

dave
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Old 12-16-2006, 08:03 PM   #118
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Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

David and Christian hit on the point I was making.

I truly believe that Ueshiba M. knew exactly what he meant when he spoke about and manifested Aikido in a physical form. I am also pretty sure that many of his Deshi (at least those who formulated their own methods to deal with his Aiki paradigm) may not have understood absolutely everything that he said and did but found their own ways of dealing with this in their own evolution.

It is a great idea to take the words and deeds of Ueshiba M. as a template for one's evolution in Aikido and the definition of those boundaries. However imho if highly skilled exponents of Japanese Budo who were his direct students training for years (and who had the benefit of Japanese as their native tongue) had to "forge" what they learned from Ueshiba M. in their own spirits and manifest their own Aiki based on his teachings (often resulting in their best approximation of his teaching) then it is unbelievable that an individual who is divorced from the context of Ueshiba M.'s reality in time, space, language and other areas can speak categorically about anything to do with his Aikido.

There are however certain "commonly held" tenets that define Ueshiba M.'s Aikido that one can use as a guide. But I think in the end one must stand on the shoulders of one's teachers, including Ueshiba M. and attempt to become more, even explore concepts that he was unwilling or unable to. In this way one becomes a true asset to his legacy imho. I think many of his Deshi did this and there is no reason why someone who practices today cannot do this. But like David said, it is important to let go of his image a bit to see clearly with our own eyes. It comes down to whether we want to emulate the messenger or his message.

Of course I am a Shodo-heathen so take everything above with a grain of salt.
LC

--Mushin Mugamae - No Mind No Posture. He who is possessed by nothing possesses everything.--
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Old 12-16-2006, 09:18 PM   #119
Peter Goldsbury
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Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

Quote:
David Knowlton wrote:
"Perhaps the real question is, "Where do you set the boundaries of your aikido?" What is inside and outside your field of study?" - Ted Ehara

Stolen from the thread - "Why are you Here?" asked by D. Hooker Sensei.
David
One question here is: Why set boundaries, anyway? Terms like 'field of study' seem to imply that the setting of boundaries here is a conscious activity, like something one undertakes at college.

Another line of thinking, seen in the second post in this thread, is that the 'boundaries' are unconscious, like a certain conception of frames, and become conscious only when they are questioned in Internet discussion forums. I think this over-emphasizes the role of such discussion forums in one's own training.

Another way of setting boundaries could be defining what one is doing, which, again, is a difficult activity and one that is not always necessary.

I do not think that training is influenced so much by the thoughts that might be going on in our own heads and when it is so influenced, and we need to talk about what we think we are doing, we resort largely to metaphor. Hence the sometimes fruitful discussions in Internet discussion forums.

P A Goldsbury
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Old 12-16-2006, 10:54 PM   #120
Erick Mead
 
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Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

Quote:
Larry Camejo wrote:
It is a great idea to take the words and deeds of Ueshiba M. as a template for one's evolution in Aikido and the definition of those boundaries. However imho if highly skilled exponents of Japanese Budo who were his direct students training for years (and who had the benefit of Japanese as their native tongue) had to "forge" what they learned from Ueshiba M. in their own spirits and manifest their own Aiki based on his teachings (often resulting in their best approximation of his teaching) then it is unbelievable that an individual who is divorced from the context of Ueshiba M.'s reality in time, space, language and other areas can speak categorically about anything to do with his Aikido.
I guess the British University Classical departments just need to turn in their shingles as a lost cause, then. One can get inside the system of his thought and relate it to the system of his movement. He thought they were of a piece. I prefer to believe him instead of sort of dimissing him to a quiet corner of the party like an embarassing dotard uncle.

No one, living or dead, is condemned to remain a prisoner of his own time. We can free ourselves to some degree from our own circumstances. We can liberate a man's ideas from one time and keep them alive in another.

We 21st century Westerners have a singular advantage over his uchi-deshi in mid-century Japan. We can ask rude and impertinent questions about his thought and practice. I love the questions, of any kind. But in framing possible answers we look to compare the best examples of the physical practice that the uchi-deshi handed down. We must also be scrupulous to answer conceptual questions from his own words. It is too easy for one or two stacked inferences to depart far from the limits of what was actually said.
Quote:
Larry Camejo wrote:
But like David said, it is important to let go of his image a bit to see clearly with our own eyes. It comes down to whether we want to emulate the messenger or his message.
In an art that is, quite literally, "embodied" that may be very hard, and perhaps a misplaced distinction.

Cordially,

Erick Mead
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Old 12-16-2006, 11:02 PM   #121
Erick Mead
 
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Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

Quote:
David Knowlton wrote:
Quote:
David Knowlton wrote:
If 'OSensei' is the boundary of your aikido then I think you dishonor his legacy.
Quote:
Erick Mead wrote:
Who said the boundary is static? Dynamic boundaries are among the most critical and dangerously useful that exist - like the boundary of oil and water, the membranes of your cells, the surface of water in air the boundary layer of air over a lifting wing.
No progress fallacy brother. You must do better!
"Honor" and "legacy" are not logical arguments. They belong, not to the logos division of rhetoric, but to ethos and pathos.

Last edited by Erick Mead : 12-16-2006 at 11:07 PM.

Cordially,

Erick Mead
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Old 12-17-2006, 09:58 AM   #122
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Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

I have to thank Larry Camejo for 'getting' what I said, if only so I'm not stoned to death behind the dojo sometime soon. I thank Erick for stimulating my mind, and especially those of rank and prestige - for putting up with my 'in your face' type of training here. I hope it shows what fine people my Senseis and Shihan are, for putting up with me regularly.

Erick, I'll just say regarding the 'dynamic boundary' concept - I find it odd that you choose to describe someone (however influential and enormous in stature in life) whom has passed from this life, as 'dynamic'.

(My gyrocopter instructor said you helicopter guys are 'sexier', and the girls know it. I only have to do four things with four limbs, not five things. The dynamic boundary, if I'm understanding the reference, is a little less dynamic without the engine coupled to the wings.)

dave
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Old 12-17-2006, 06:37 PM   #123
Erick Mead
 
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Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

Quote:
David Knowlton wrote:
Erick, I'll just say regarding the 'dynamic boundary' concept - I find it odd that you choose to describe someone (however influential and enormous in stature in life) whom has passed from this life, as 'dynamic'.
Since he still has all of us running around trying to pin him down, I'd say he's doing pretty good for a dead man -- dynamically speaking....

Cordially,

Erick Mead
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Old 12-18-2006, 04:52 AM   #124
L. Camejo
 
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Re: For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido?

Quote:
Erick Mead wrote:
Since he still has all of us running around trying to pin him down, I'd say he's doing pretty good for a dead man -- dynamically speaking....
Well I wouldn't say all of us. Of course for those still "running around trying to pin him down" it may only mean that the Uke in this case has much better waza than the Tori/Nage.

Train harder, train smarter.
Gambatte.

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