Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > General

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 11-23-2006, 10:14 AM   #51
crbateman
  AikiWeb Forums Contributing Member
 
crbateman's Avatar
Location: Orlando, FL
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 1,498
Offline
Re: Competition and testing your skills

Quote:
David Sim wrote:
Another semi-related question - I've been told that a lot of people 'peak' in (shiai randori) competiton around second or third dan. Is this the case, and if so why? Is it to do with passing peak physical condition or just becoming less interested in competition?
That is a great question! There may be components of both involved, but in talking with a few of quite advanced rank, the gist I get was explained by a well known Japanese Shihan thus: With accomplished training, one gets a better (more enlightened) idea of what Aikido is about, and although one might keep vigorous randori an element of his students' training, one often feels the display a bit (or a lot) too vulgar and pretentious to do personally, as there is no longer a need to prove to oneself that ones techniques are effective. I have to take his word for it, as I have nowhere close to achieved that level in my own training, but it does make sense.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2006, 10:18 AM   #52
DonMagee
Location: Indiana
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 1,311
United_States
Offline
Re: Competition and testing your skills

Quote:
Daren Sims wrote:
Don

You make some great points which carry an enormous validity.

However I dont quite go with this one.

I do see a distinction between Fighting and Art.

Fighting is what is says on the tin...but an Art teaches so much more.

You have to want it.
I personally think it is a mistranslation. I think martial arts just means teachings of war. Where art is used as teachings and not anything special. I tell people I teach the art of linux or the art of computer programming. There is no special spiritial thing I'm teaching them, no better life. I'm teaching them to program a computer.

Quote:
Daren Sims wrote:
I
Sports fighters especially top MMA guys are a dedicated, talented and single minded breed.

They use the training methods that have evolved since MMA became a separate form (rather than a hybrid of other styles) to achieve the highest level of practice in their chosen arena eg the ring, Octagon or whatever.
And if they were shown a better way, you better believe they would do it.

Quote:
Daren Sims wrote:
Most but not all of these skills are directly transferrable to 'street' scenarios. (Some are even dangerous - ask anyone thats been shanked while banging in a double leg takedown...)

Generally though they are all good skills for the subset of the population able to cope with the rigours of such training.

What about the other 99%.?
I don't belive you need to train as hard as I do to be any good at it. I know guys who train harder than I do and less than I do. The guys who only train 1 -2 days a week, never compete, only spar still clean up on the guys who come in saying they are 'street fighters' and fight with bad punches, open guards, and crappy takedowns. You don't need to be a pro fighter, you just need to spar with different kinds of people to put yourself in different situations.

Quote:
Daren Sims wrote:
You are in your mid to late 20's I believe? (I did look it up once before...no mystical stuff going on there), you're male and you clearly have time to train hard (since you said in a previous post that you like to train almost to exhaustion 4 days a week.)

Not everyone fits this profile.

Am I saying aikido is a softer option?

Maybe I am. In some respects. However I prefer to think of it as a longer road.

And one where the more careful looking after my body means I'll still be here when I'm 50, 60, 70 and I'd love to think beyond that even.
It's funny, my bjj instructor told me the greatest thing about bjj was you could practice it your entire life. Again though, you dont compete your entire life, but you do spar your entire life. Sparing is the key point here, competition is a logical extension of sparing for people who want even more stress testing.

Quote:
Daren Sims wrote:
My personal experiences in MMA seemed to bear out that it was dog eat dog and the percentage of drop outs were huge.
I'd say that you have to want it to get it. Just like aikido. Most people come in with misconceptions, they find out the truth and leave.

Quote:
Daren Sims wrote:
I also found it extremely hard on the body - once an elbow has been arm barred beyond its range then it never seems the same again.
This is not a MMA problem, this is even an aikido problem. If they guys you train with spaz out or don't respect the tap, then you have bigger problems.

Quote:
Daren Sims wrote:
So where do people go that don't want to compete? that aren't into winning and losing trophys? and that want to stay in one piece long term?
They should still spar. A few times a month would greatly improve their ability to leverage their techniques in an actual altercation.

Quote:
Daren Sims wrote:
My female students for instance - are they not doing MA because they don't prepare for competition? I'm sure they would get hammered by trained competitors, heck, I've been hammered by them too.
Are they training aikido so they can defend themselves? If they are I think it is VERY important for them to realize the weight and strength a man has. The stress that comes when a man grabs you with the intention of pinning you down typically overwhelms most women who are unprepared for it. It is very very important that they spar for self defense like anyone else, but it is even more important that they spar with men and learn how to deal with differences in power and weight. Until they have had a man coming at them, trying to throw them, and then trying to pin them down, they really have no idea how much more power is there. Yes, most women wont like this, but if they don't want to do it, they need to rethink their training. Train for fitness or something, but not self defense.

Quote:
Daren Sims wrote:
I do believe that the marginal improvement I may find should I slide back into a more competitive environment are not enough for me to sacrifice the limited training time I have.
I don't believe the improvements are marginal. At least in my case the improvements have been huge. I had no martial ability after a year of aikido and 10 years of point sparing TKD. The first time I got put to task, I just crumbled under the pressure. I found my stances were bad ideas, my movements were contrived. And I did not know how to deal with resistance. After sparing, I now am relaxed most of the time, more confident, able to adapt to different body types, resistance, strength, power. And I've made what I've learned work for me.

Quote:
Daren Sims wrote:
My old ju-jitsu instructor drew up a distinction between his competion work and his street oriented defence.

For him they were very much not the same.
I think the difference for me is that I would not try to engage on the street, I would try to talk myself out of it. Then if I did engage, I would focus on getting a superior position, and dominating my opponent just like in competition. Only I would not be restricted to my attacks, strikes to back of the head, eye gouges, etc are all fair game. The strategy is still the same, the only difference is what dirt I can add and that I will try not to go to the ground.

Quote:
Daren Sims wrote:
This is why street fighters with strategy continue to beat highly experienced MA fighters in the street when they wouldn't last 5 seconds with them in the ring.
I dont understand, Fedor is going to kill someone on the street. He's not bound by rules simply because he trains with them. Just like no n sparing people are not bound by no actually finishing their death blows simply because they never finish them in practice. Unless you are talking about training someone to pull and use a weapon, or other tactics like always bring 5 friends. You can either fight or you can't fight. The only way to build this skill with any reliability is to spar.

Quote:
Daren Sims wrote:
This comes from a guy who has taken his competition guys to fight in Pride so I value his advice.
Did he teach them street as well? If he did, did they spar with these techniques? If they did, that makes my point.



Quote:
Daren Sims wrote:
For me the traditional stuff in Aikido while not so specialised can still offer much martial effectiveness.
I think it can as well. I even think it can make a great compliment to judo or bjj. In fact that is why I still go train on saturdays. However, I think without sparing we are just pretending.


Quote:
Daren Sims wrote:
All anyone can really do it match their training with their personal aspirations. As long as people are realistic then it is not an issue.
I totally agree.


Quote:
Daren Sims wrote:
If I'm going to have to fight - I'm not going to warn someone, slip on my lycra and knee pads and issue a challenge.
Same here, although I might politly ask them to wear a gi. It's a judo thing

Quote:
Daren Sims wrote:
I'm going to hit them (we do practice that) ...I'm going to do it very hard and I'm going to do it to them before they do it to me.
But without sparing, how do you know you can hit a guy who just though the act of picking a fight with you, is ready to fight. He might be a boxer, he might not, he might be hard headed, he might be able to take that punch, he might be on crack. You throw that punch, he eats it and blasts you. Do you train for that? You don't need situation training with sparing. You learn how to leverage technique on the fly with random situations that naturally happen.
Once its done I'm going to disappear very quickly.

Quote:
Daren Sims wrote:
To train for this doesn't take a lot of physical preparation. Its very much a last option and the things I've learned from swapping roles as uke tori have contributed greatly to this.
I think the uke/tori partnership is a good start, it teaches some timing, but it has little motion (well it has motion but it is contrived) and typically little energy. I really believe all training should fit Matt Thorntons aliveness description ( Why aliveness? ). That doesn't mean competition, it just means drilling in a natural non contrived situation and eventually sparing.

Quote:
Daren Sims wrote:
I'm much more likely to recognise a brewing situation and just slip away and avoid it.
I never needed martial arts to tell me I was in a bad situation. But the better I get at fighting, the less desire I have to actually fight outside of competition. It's like my male ego is getting under control.

Quote:
Daren Sims wrote:
So one thing I have learned from TMA is that it is'nt just about Fighting.
It's about learning how to fight. Not about fighting.

Quote:
Daren Sims wrote:
I believe it was Bruce Lee who coined the phrase 'fighting without fighting'.

Perhaps a fitting sentiment to close.
It's close to what I'm saying. We learn to fight so that we don't have to fight. But in order to learn to fight, we have to well....fight.

- Don
"If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough" - Albert Einstein
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2006, 10:21 AM   #53
DonMagee
Location: Indiana
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 1,311
United_States
Offline
Re: Competition and testing your skills

Quote:
David Sim wrote:
I
Another semi-related question - I've been told that a lot of people 'peak' in (shiai randori) competiton around second or third dan. Is this the case, and if so why? Is it to do with passing peak physical condition or just becoming less interested in competition?
I was told it is because of age usually. That and at least in judo, after 3rd it is about what you give back to the art, not skill that allows for advancement. I think though that the more you compete the less you need it. I Know judo guys in their 70's that haven't competed in decades that can still wreck me on the mat. They learned what they needed to learn though sparing. They don't need it anymore.

- Don
"If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough" - Albert Einstein
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2006, 11:04 AM   #54
L. Camejo
 
L. Camejo's Avatar
Dojo: Ontario Martial Arts
Location: Mississauga, Ontario
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 1,423
Canada
Offline
Re: Competition and testing your skills

Quote:
David Sim wrote:
Another semi-related question - I've been told that a lot of people 'peak' in (shiai randori) competiton around second or third dan. Is this the case, and if so why? Is it to do with passing peak physical condition or just becoming less interested in competition?
Just to throw in the X-factor on that hypothesis, the current US Toshu Shiai Champion and Tanto Shiai Champ for the last 6 years running is 4th Dan I believe and over 50.

His good shiai bouts tend not to look so much like "fights" in the typical sense imo but more akin to the Aikido strategy of stepping in and cutting down one's opponent in a single stroke imho.

Of course he could just be an anomaly.

There is a thread here with a vid from the last nationals - http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=11213

I think regardless of rank although one may be confident that one's waza is good enough for self defence and may have transcended the need to compete, training with resistance helps one understand whether the other aspects of one's training are also being developed, e.g. achievement of efficient internal bodily structures, application of less movement to execute waza, increased usage of "soft arm power" or whatever stuff the higher ups focus on to develop their Aikido at 6th Dan and above. Imo at that level their physical expression of waza should be able to reflect a level that truly makes resistance futile.

Gambatte.
LC

Last edited by L. Camejo : 11-23-2006 at 11:07 AM.

--Mushin Mugamae - No Mind No Posture. He who is possessed by nothing possesses everything.--
http://www.tntaikido.org
http://www.mushinkan.ca
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2006, 11:08 AM   #55
Dazzler
Dojo: Bristol North Aikido Dojo
Location: Bristol
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 659
England
Offline
Re: Competition and testing your skills

Quote:
Don Magee wrote:
I personally think it is a mistranslation. I think martial arts just means teachings of war. Where art is used as teachings and not anything special. I tell people I teach the art of linux or the art of computer programming. There is no special spiritial thing I'm teaching them, no better life. I'm teaching them to program a computer.
.
Well, guess we'll just have to differ on that one Don. I accept that it needs the 'Martial' but feel it is possible to retain this and deliver more. How much martial against how much art is the tricky thing to balance and on any mat on any evening we've got some with very martial aikido and some with very arty aikido.

I guess again that this is another personal thing.


Quote:
Don Magee wrote:
I don't belive you need to train as hard as I do to be any good at it. I know guys who train harder than I do and less than I do. The guys who only train 1 -2 days a week, never compete, only spar still clean up on the guys who come in saying they are 'street fighters' and fight with bad punches, open guards, and crappy takedowns. You don't need to be a pro fighter, you just need to spar with different kinds of people to put yourself in different situations.
Hear what you are saying Don, but my point really was that sure, a bit of training will enable the guys in dojo to take out the street wanabees, but as you say they have come in to the dojo and essentially changed environment.

I'm looking to have an edge outside of this environment and look to avoid these 1 on 1 competitive scenarios at all costs. If pushed then my reactions have usually been of the type that you simply cannot practice in the dojo whether MMA, aikido or whatever.


Quote:
Don Magee wrote:
It's funny, my bjj instructor told me the greatest thing about bjj was you could practice it your entire life. Again though, you dont compete your entire life, but you do spar your entire life. Sparing is the key point here, competition is a logical extension of sparing for people who want even more stress testing.
.
Fair enough - but do you see a pattern of controlled behaviour here moving away from the full monty? I dont see this as being wildly different from well practiced Aikido or anything else. (as long as its good).



Quote:
Don Magee wrote:
I'd say that you have to want it to get it. Just like aikido. Most people come in with misconceptions, they find out the truth and leave.
.
Agreed.


Quote:
Don Magee wrote:
This is not a MMA problem, this is even an aikido problem. If they guys you train with spaz out or don't respect the tap, then you have bigger problems.
.
Agree to a certain extent, just found that the beginners in MMA were very different to Aikido...probably due to the adrenaline from the increased proximity to a real fight and the fear of losing. This resulted in loss of control and a lot more injuries.


Quote:
Don Magee wrote:
They should still spar. A few times a month would greatly improve their ability to leverage their techniques in an actual altercation.

Are they training aikido so they can defend themselves? If they are I think it is VERY important for them to realize the weight and strength a man has. The stress that comes when a man grabs you with the intention of pinning you down typically overwhelms most women who are unprepared for it. It is very very important that they spar for self defense like anyone else, but it is even more important that they spar with men and learn how to deal with differences in power and weight. Until they have had a man coming at them, trying to throw them, and then trying to pin them down, they really have no idea how much more power is there. Yes, most women wont like this, but if they don't want to do it, they need to rethink their training. Train for fitness or something, but not self defense.
.
Again ...that precisely it. Some are training for limited fighting ability but at the same time realising many of the benefits that you questioned in Marks thread.


Quote:
Don Magee wrote:
I don't believe the improvements are marginal. At least in my case the improvements have been huge. I had no martial ability after a year of aikido and 10 years of point sparing TKD. The first time I got put to task, I just crumbled under the pressure. I found my stances were bad ideas, my movements were contrived. And I did not know how to deal with resistance. After sparing, I now am relaxed most of the time, more confident, able to adapt to different body types, resistance, strength, power. And I've made what I've learned work for me.
.
Everyone is different. I also am much more relaxed most of the time.

Before MA I was much more aggressive and in my teens and twenties always fighting.

It could be age thats mellowed me but I think its aikido.


Quote:
Don Magee wrote:
I think the difference for me is that I would not try to engage on the street, I would try to talk myself out of it. Then if I did engage, I would focus on getting a superior position, and dominating my opponent just like in competition. Only I would not be restricted to my attacks, strikes to back of the head, eye gouges, etc are all fair game. The strategy is still the same, the only difference is what dirt I can add and that I will try not to go to the ground.
.
Not a lot different from many of us here I'd imagine.

Quote:
Don Magee wrote:
I dont understand, Fedor is going to kill someone on the street. He's not bound by rules simply because he trains with them. Just like no n sparing people are not bound by no actually finishing their death blows simply because they never finish them in practice. Unless you are talking about training someone to pull and use a weapon, or other tactics like always bring 5 friends. You can either fight or you can't fight. The only way to build this skill with any reliability is to spar.
.
Sure ...if all you are after is fighting then you will best develop this skillby fighting.



Quote:
Don Magee wrote:
Did he teach them street as well? If he did, did they spar with these techniques? If they did, that makes my point.
.
He certainly teaches both. My preference was always for his street stuff. We did work them but we couldn't really spar with the eye gouging stuff included. TBH as you know once both parties are moving its hard to do much except punch and kick until you've clinched anyway.



Quote:
Don Magee wrote:

But without sparing, how do you know you can hit a guy who just though the act of picking a fight with you, is ready to fight. He might be a boxer, he might not, he might be hard headed, he might be able to take that punch, he might be on crack. You throw that punch, he eats it and blasts you. Do you train for that? You don't need situation training with sparing. You learn how to leverage technique on the fly with random situations that naturally happen.
Once its done I'm going to disappear very quickly.
.
Well you kind of have me there. I do spar.

Not regularly but when life permits.

But thats my choice like your guys that don't compete.

I choose a level of training intensity thats right for me. Everyone else has this same choice I feel.

Gotta go now - Apologies if responses get a little garbled - should have cut and pasted into notepad so I didn't lose sight of my points you were countering.

Will be back on line tomorrow.

Regards
D
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2006, 11:09 AM   #56
Demetrio Cereijo
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 2,219
Spain
Offline
Re: Competition and testing your skills

Don,

I agree with you, but there is a thing about "aliveness" that you and some of the followers (usually the more vocal about Guru Thornton concepts-philosophy) usually forget or consciously don't talk or point to.

I'm referring to things like this article, where you can read things like:

Quote:
Finally, all that's left is a sports like environment, and performance. At this point it's time for the ego's last step. The realization that measurement itself is futility.

Although what you are now left doing is a million times more ‘real' than anything an image based Martial Artist will ever engage in; it still must not serve as a measurement of who YOU are.

Why? For one it's always relative so you must evaluate yourself ONLY based on YOUR own increases in performance. And although that requires another person, or opponent, that does not mean you are measuring yourself against that person. You only measure your progress based on your previous skill level, not their previous skill level. There will ALWAYS be someone better, stronger, faster, or smarter on any given day. There will also ALWAYS be people you will better then, on any given day. Therefore that form of measurement is meaningless at best. All that matters is that you grow in comparison to where you where before, NOT in comparison to who you could or could not beat before.

The second reason why measurement is futility is because WHO you actually ARE exists completely outside duality, and therefore outside the process of measurement.
Or training with alivenes as a "powerful yoga" (in Thornton's own words in other forum).

And, as consider myself a "follower" of Thornton way of thougt in some way, i wonder why are you taking only pieces of his "doctrine" and starting another "lost in translation" process. Are you really understanding Thornton and trying to get out of the dualism or are you stuck in the "how do i measure myself"?
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2006, 07:08 PM   #57
carlo pagal
Dojo: iloilo aikido dojo
Location: iloilo city
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 30
Philippines
Offline
Re: Competition and testing your skills

Jason Jordan wrote:
In all honesty....I think we have lost the true meaning of cooperating. Cooperating in my mind is giving me a very real scenario to work with, while not being animalistic and trying to kill me.

I totally agree with you Jason. How would you know if the techniques that you've learned are really effective in the real world?
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2006, 11:20 PM   #58
DonMagee
Location: Indiana
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 1,311
United_States
Offline
Re: Competition and testing your skills

Quote:
Demetrio Cereijo wrote:
Don,

I agree with you, but there is a thing about "aliveness" that you and some of the followers (usually the more vocal about Guru Thornton concepts-philosophy) usually forget or consciously don't talk or point to.

I'm referring to things like this article, where you can read things like:



Or training with alivenes as a "powerful yoga" (in Thornton's own words in other forum).

And, as consider myself a "follower" of Thornton way of thougt in some way, i wonder why are you taking only pieces of his "doctrine" and starting another "lost in translation" process. Are you really understanding Thornton and trying to get out of the dualism or are you stuck in the "how do i measure myself"?
I do not use martial arts to measure my self worth. The things he talks about there I feel are self evident to anyone who competes seriously, and thus really just seem obvious to me. I feel that if you are going to do anything, you should do it to the best of your ability, with the best training methods you can find to gain that ability.

The points I'm touching on are really about effectiveness of your martial art. It's not about if you can beat person X, its about can the majority of people who train with your methods leverage their techniques against people who are trying to stop them. It is pointless to measure yourself against another. I know guys who destroy me on the mat with less than 4 months training. Of course they are the same guys who excel at any physical thing they do. If I were to measure my success with them as a bar, I would be very depressed as I would have to conclude I really really suck at this. But if I measure my success in martial arts in how I've gained skill in the 10+ years I've trained, I'd have to say the last 2 years have been the most eye opening and the biggest gains. It wasn't though some mystical experince, or some awakening I got though constantly improving kata. It was finally getting the guts to step up and take a risk.

While the points you shown are very valid, and I agree with them fully, I just don't think they fit in this conversation. I'm talking about having the best chance to reduce the signal to noise ratio in your art. Making sure what is being taught is useful, and finally, giving yourself the best chance possible to actually be able to leverage your art.

Can you have a spiritual experience in the martial arts? Sure.
Can you have a spiritual experience in sport competition? Sure.
Does it make you better at it? Not really.

I was a top runner in high school, I never had a runner's high. I have had zen like moments in competition. Very spiritual things. However, I do not train martial arts for these experiences, they are just a nice byproduct. I train as a form of entertainment, a way to keep myself in shape, and to develop a skill that may be useful to pass down to my children (IF I ever have any). That skill being the ability if need be to defend yourself.

I do not worry about being able to defend myself, I worry about being able to do what I'm training to do. That would be beat another man in some form of unarmed combat. Self defense is a side effect. However, it is my belief that if you can not beat a man with limited rules, then you can not beat him without rules as he can leverage the same 'illegal moves' you can, only he is already one up on you as he can beat you with rules.

In amature fights I watch, untrained street fighters like to sign up. They usually do very poorly, despite being stronger, meaner, more aggressive, etc. However, when they are paired with a trained fighter who has not spared, or is having his first 'real' fight, it is still a toss up. But take that same fighter a few fights later, and he tears up that untrained thug. Because he has learned how to leverage his skills under pressure.

I think that Matt's idea of aliveness helps build skills that work in high stress situations faster, due to the lack of scripted structure and emphasis on 'playing' and learning what works for you. Again, I don't think you need to get into MMA competition in order to be able to use your aikido, but I think you do need to spar and train with aliveness to actually be able to use your aikido.

- Don
"If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough" - Albert Einstein
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2006, 12:24 AM   #59
PeterR
 
PeterR's Avatar
Dojo: Shodokan Honbu (Osaka)
Location: Himeji, Japan
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 3,318
Japan
Online
Re: Competition and testing your skills

Quote:
Szczepan Janczuk wrote:
Aikido is not about winning or losing. O sensei wasn't interested about it.So the nature of aikido technique is cooperative practice. Such practice develops very different spirit then sparring or competition. O sensei was interested by spiritual(-- not physical) developpement using martial techniques . His students knew already how to fight, they weren't looking for another system 'how to fight'.
Actually if you read about his students very few if any went to him for spiritual purposes they went because of his technique. Tenru, Tomiki, Shioda, all the same.

Where does it say Tomiki Aikido is about winning and losing. You surely didn't hear that from Tomiki or any of its practitioners.

Peter Rehse Shodokan Aikido
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2006, 12:34 PM   #60
skinnymonkey
Dojo: Black Walnut Aikido - Ashland, OH
Location: ohio
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 57
United_States
Offline
Re: Competition and testing your skills

Peter, I train with Bob King of Mansfield. He's a great guy and I really enjoy working with him. He's taught me a lot. Ever worked with him?

Jeff D.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2006, 07:33 PM   #61
PeterR
 
PeterR's Avatar
Dojo: Shodokan Honbu (Osaka)
Location: Himeji, Japan
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 3,318
Japan
Online
Re: Competition and testing your skills

Of course - I saw his Yondan promotion and am in occaisional contact with his son who I understand did very well at the US Nationals.

Bob King did me a great favor once. I had returned to Canada after Japan and had been training in Aikikai for about a year. At the time I was just Shodan but Bob made a point about asking about tekubi waza oshitaoshi - it was a subtle point but the way it was asked went a long way to convincing me to open a dojo - which I did shortly afterward. Its these little moments that make all the difference.

Please ask Bob your question here. He is of a practical bent.

Peter Rehse Shodokan Aikido
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2006, 08:24 PM   #62
skinnymonkey
Dojo: Black Walnut Aikido - Ashland, OH
Location: ohio
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 57
United_States
Offline
Re: Competition and testing your skills

I'm glad that you've met! Bob and I have definitely talked about this subject before (and will again, I'm sure) but I was just curious about some other viewpoints!

Thanks!

Jeff D.
  Reply With Quote

Please visit our sponsor:

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!



Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Competition in Aikido Wynand van Dyk General 202 08-20-2008 10:51 AM
Standards of testing??? Edwin Neal Testing 51 05-03-2006 10:20 PM
Taigi IrimiTom Training 22 07-19-2005 05:50 PM
refusing a grading Kung Fu Liane Testing 39 05-09-2003 04:53 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:33 AM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2017 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2017 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate