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Old 05-12-2006, 02:34 PM   #226
Kevin Leavitt
 
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

I've been wrong before and I have no problem with it. I do want to clarify, I never said I was "right" about anything. Only that at this juncture, this is how I see things!

Ironically that is probably the only reason I have any students right now. Not because I am necessarily good or an authority on what I do or know, but that I offer an environment that fosters learning, I set the example for training hard, and I am willing and secure in my knowledge of what I don't know!

If you could go back to circa 1996 and pull some of the old aikido-l listserve post, you'd see I do not necessarily subscribe to some of the opinions I had back then! I have no problem saying "yup, I guess I was wrong!"

Again, I still don't undestand if westerners missed so much information that is critical to the physcial manifestation of the internal, then it would seem logical that we'd see things in the olympics and other venues of physical excellent being dominated to a very high degree by "easterners". Again, I don't see it. Alas this is getting repetitive!

It's not that I think it is of no value, it is just that I don't see it demonstrated in various contest of martial prowness outside of the schools that set the parameters and conditions for that to be exploited.

To me it is like a TKD guy that is very good at TKD and stating that a MMA guy is missing some critical skills in the ring. The TKD guy goes into the ring and gets slaughtered by the MMA guy. So the MMA guy says "what can you teach me again?"

Not that what the TKD guy does is not important in the realm of TKD, he just should not be throwing stones at another guys house saying he is lacking something to make him "complete".

Now the TKD guy might be able to teach the MMA guy some things about kicks that are useful. (Maybe this is all that is really being proposed by you Mike concerning the Jo Trick), however this is much different than the TKD guy saying that he has something very "significant" that the MMA guy is lacking in.

I think it is all realitive to the perspective you take to your art. What concerns me is that many in the so-called "eastern martial arts", lure people in the arts into thinking that there is something very important that they and their teachers are missing that is somehow crucial to there training when it is all realitive to the situation at hand.

This might go along with what Dennis Hooker is talking about when he mentions the "narrow-mindedness" in the martial arts. I don't want to put words in his mouth or skew his post though.

Martial arts, especially arts like aikido are very prone to cognitive dissonance, "group think", distortion, and mis-interpretation by us. We all want to think that somehow there is something magical or mysterious about what we do and that if we train with the right instructor, meditate on the right things, and train long and hard enough the eventually, "poof" we will become "one with the universe and our art" and be "just like O'Sensei".

The ironic thing is, that it is not mysterious and it is right there in front of us all the time. We just simply need to "let go" and recieve, to me THAT is the challenge and the hardest thing for us to do!

Also, you don't even have to get "good" at the martial art or demonstrate physcial proweness to find it!

I would only caution students to simply "be in the moment" and enjoy the journey and their training, that is what it is about. I suppose that is why I am so passionate about responding to this post. Once we start focusing on Jo Tricks, the perfect iriminage, and feeling KI emanating from our finger tips, we objectify our practice and we lose sight of the value and goal that we are trying to obtain!

Again, not that there is anything wrong with doing the Jo Trick as an exercise. I re-interate, there is value in it for training, just that these things have their place and failure to do these things does not make you any less of a proficient budoka! It is the state and health of the mind, body, and spirit that matters the most!
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Old 05-12-2006, 04:23 PM   #227
statisticool
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote:
Why leave a public post of what you don't know in 2006 when it's obviously growing rapidly as the information most of the westerners missed in their various martial arts?
If some people have missed out on tricks explainable by cooperation and/or regular ol' body mechanics they aren't really missing anything.

A secret of internal strength?:
"Let your weight from the crotch area BE in his hands."
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Old 05-12-2006, 08:00 PM   #228
Mike Sigman
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

Quote:
Kevin Leavitt wrote:
I've been wrong before and I have no problem with it. I do want to clarify, I never said I was "right" about anything. Only that at this juncture, this is how I see things!
Well, Kevin, you're about as happily fatalistic as anyone I know.
Quote:
Ironically that is probably the only reason I have any students right now. Not because I am necessarily good or an authority on what I do or know, but that I offer an environment that fosters learning, I set the example for training hard, and I am willing and secure in my knowledge of what I don't know!
I'm too fatalistic to worry about everyone in the world, so each to his own. And if you misled your students or I misled mine (but wait... that's why I don't teach!), then c'est la vie ("ch'est la Vye" to you Okies out there).
Quote:
Again, I still don't undestand if westerners missed so much information that is critical to the physcial manifestation of the internal, then it would seem logical that we'd see things in the olympics and other venues of physical excellent being dominated to a very high degree by "easterners". Again, I don't see it. Alas this is getting repetitive!
Alas AND alack, and with alacrity!
Quote:
I think it is all realitive to the perspective you take to your art. What concerns me is that many in the so-called "eastern martial arts", lure people in the arts into thinking that there is something very important that they and their teachers are missing that is somehow crucial to there training when it is all realitive to the situation at hand.

This might go along with what Dennis Hooker is talking about when he mentions the "narrow-mindedness" in the martial arts. I don't want to put words in his mouth or skew his post though.
Well, I tend to admire the elan and savoir faire with which someone's chosen martial art is so brilliant that it must be followed, but so understandable that it impugns the founder's reputation by making him only a colorful fellow, easily understood.
Quote:
The ironic thing is, that it is not mysterious and it is right there in front of us all the time. We just simply need to "let go" and recieve, to me THAT is the challenge and the hardest thing for us to do!
I rest my case.

Regards,

Mike
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Old 05-15-2006, 08:21 AM   #229
Ron Tisdale
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

Quote:
I would only caution students to simply "be in the moment" and enjoy the journey and their training, that is what it is about. I suppose that is why I am so passionate about responding to this post. Once we start focusing on Jo Tricks, the perfect iriminage, and feeling KI emanating from our finger tips, we objectify our practice and we lose sight of the value and goal that we are trying to obtain!
Hi Kevin,

While I can understand your personal viewpoint, I do have to wonder about something. In the quote above, you refer to "the perfect iriminage, and feeling KI emanating from our finger tips," and equate those things with the "jo trick". It seems to me that that would be a logical fallacy, by your own admission. If so, then why do it? Why trivialize the serious parts of this conversation with the less serious issues which really have not even been posited by anyone here?

It makes your arguement, which without such methods seems fairly strong, rather weak.

Best,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
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"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
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Old 05-15-2006, 10:07 AM   #230
Kevin Leavitt
 
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

Ron, Might be the time of day right now (it is late for me!), so I am not sure I understand what you are saying.

Maybe I am not very clear in my words.

My point is this. Everything must be done with moderation and balance.

We want to strive for excellence and to improve in everything we do. The Jo Trick can be a way to demonstrate certain aspects and to convey concepts that much I agree with.

I suppose what I am most critical of is the objectification of such things as being "mysterious", the insinuation that there are only special eastern people and a few rare individuals can convey they things, and that it somehow holds a great matter of significance in training.

The danger is that we get people in the martial arts that feel that their is some "holy grail" that if they can obtain those magical secrets, will some how be special or very powerful.

Dan outright says that he knows that if Chuck Liddell mastered "this stuff" that his punches would be more powerful.

No disrespect to Dan, but how would he know what Chuck Liddell has mastered or not mastered? How do you know how many pounds per square inch he is packing in his punch? There is an air of assumption and judgement that does not sit well with me. (Sorry Dan)

It can be devisive and makes some people feel special at the exclusion of others. Those that may not be as experienced in martial arts get caught up in the "stuff" that we run around preaching, talking about, and demonstrating and they don't really have the base to judge what is important or not important.

Again, I don't mean to trivialize the value of KI training and things like the Jo trick. I simply think that moderation is the key. There is a tendency for people to try and quantify and objectify aspects of their training. In doing so they run the risk of putting too much focus and importance on things that are not quite as special they might seem to be.

I hope this makes sense Ron.
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Old 05-15-2006, 11:44 AM   #231
Ron Tisdale
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

That was much clearer, and to the point. Thanks!

Best,
Ron

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Old 05-15-2006, 11:57 AM   #232
Mike Sigman
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

Quote:
Kevin Leavitt wrote:
I suppose what I am most critical of is the objectification of such things as being "mysterious", the insinuation that there are only special eastern people and a few rare individuals can convey they things, and that it somehow holds a great matter of significance in training.
Just for the record, Kevin, who has said that the jo-trick, etc., is "mysterious"?

And who has said anything about a "few rare individuals"? From my perspective, this sort of training is done by a LARGE number of people, but NOT ALL people know how to do it. It's appears to be a deliberate diminishment of the many people that can do these things to hold out that they are "rare individuals". Perhaps an uncalled-for characterization?
Quote:
The danger is that we get people in the martial arts that feel that their is some "holy grail" that if they can obtain those magical secrets, will some how be special or very powerful.
Again, this appears to be a distortion of the original comments, Kevin. Let's just say that there are, for example, a few people who are saying, "Hey, this stuff about 'moving from the middle' is more important than most people think and it's worth looking at". That's not the same thing as a "few rare indivduals" saying that "hey, there's this Holy Grail of stuff and only we know it". C'mon. Granted, some people may think they're special if they've got bits and pieces (I had just such an a-hole Aikido instructor, BTW), but overall, it has to be noted that the commentaries about how this stuff is almost universal, while the actual knowledge is fairly scarce.

Regards,

Mike
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Old 05-15-2006, 12:33 PM   #233
Kevin Leavitt
 
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

Good points Mike. I was only clarifying my position of why I am critical or at least suspect of such things. Not meant to be directed at you in anyway.

Yes, you are correct, I am probably heading into "insinuation land" myself at this point, by the nature of the thread.

Do you have any issues, though with my general concept of moderation etc? Seems you agree that there are those that do take things to extremes. I suspect that you and I may agree on things more than it appears. Maybe not agree on the realitive importance on a scale, but agree on things conceptually.

I suppose I could just simply chalk things up to theorectical practice vs. applied practice. University professors can demonstrate various theories and talk in isolation about very minute details about inane and obscure facts that..yes...are important at some place and time. However, many have no idea about how to actually employ the theories they teach in a "real situation". Many Undergrads and some guys on there own with no education can intuitively put into practice what these guys preach with little or no understanding of the theories and be very successful in implementing.

I suppose I am more aligned with those that can do versus those that can talk. both are important, but I think given the nature of martial arts...it is more about doing and talking than talking alone. I am not insinuating that anyone here is necessarily guilty of that.

The basis of my argument is that "good for them" glad these guys can have push hand competitions. It is important to them. Yes I can learn something from them I am sure. However, when they cross over and start talking about what others are lacking, then they need to be prepared to demonstrate that within the confines of the art or situation in which they say they are judging...or they are simply "college professors" talking about some theories that they themselves cannot back up.

I am not talking about some isolated exercises or demonstrations.

It sounds like this was the one experience that was had at Aiki Expo last year, although I wasn't there so I can't say for sure.

I really do not mean to continue on. I was simply clarifying my points to Ron about my concerns. They are not directed necessarily at anyone. I have just grown frustrated over the years with people that fixate on KI and then there are those that perpetuate that to gain favor or power, rather than manage, teach, guide, or mentor through proper balance.

I must emphasize that I do not know both you are Dan so I cannot say for sure what you are able to do or not do, so it is not my place or intent to judge either one of you or insinuate that you guys can not practice what you preach. For all I know you guys can and do all the time. To be honest, I'd love to train with both of you, as I have appreciated your candor, patience, and willingness to discuss these subjects!

I am simply not an easy person to deal with in training as I tend to be critical and very stubborn to teach! Probably why it has taken me so many years to advance!

I really do think at this point, I am beating a dead horse...and this is really not related to the topic any longer. Sorry to take up time and distract you guys!
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Old 05-15-2006, 12:33 PM   #234
wendyrowe
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote:
... who has said anything about a "few rare individuals"? From my perspective, this sort of training is done by a LARGE number of people, but NOT ALL people know how to do it... Let's just say that there are, for example, a few people who are saying, "Hey, this stuff about 'moving from the middle' is more important than most people think and it's worth looking at". That's not the same thing as a "few rare indivduals" saying that "hey, there's this Holy Grail of stuff and only we know it"....overall, it has to be noted that the commentaries about how this stuff is almost universal, while the actual knowledge is fairly scarce.
Mike, I'm having trouble following your train of thought. Sometimes throughout these discussions it seems like you're saying "the actual knowledge is fairly scarce," but sometimes you seem to be saying "this sort of training is done by a LARGE number of people." Above, I distilled your post into what I think are your salient points; but I'm not sure I managed to collect the essence and I hope I haven't accidentally changed your meaning.

Are you saying that a large number of people do this sort of training without understanding it, and hence the knowledge is fairly scarce even though a large number of people do it? Or am I missing something else?

Sorry to be dense.
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Old 05-15-2006, 12:46 PM   #235
Mike Sigman
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

Quote:
Wendy Rowe wrote:
Sometimes throughout these discussions it seems like you're saying "the actual knowledge is fairly scarce," but sometimes you seem to be saying "this sort of training is done by a LARGE number of people." [[snipsky]] Are you saying that a large number of people do this sort of training without understanding it, and hence the knowledge is fairly scarce even though a large number of people do it? Or am I missing something else?
Hi Wendy:

What I'm saying is that within the hierarchy of Aikido, most people (well, from a westerner's perspective in a western land) don't know how to do these things, but some certainly do/did and they demonstrated their skills. The list in Aikido of people is not all that short and it has to include a Sandan I met in 1975 who was visiting from Hombu dojo and who demonstrated the unusual form of strength that first got me started in Aikido. But if you take the number of Aikido practitioners that can do these things, it's a small (but not negligibly small) number in comparison with the whole of Aikido. Then you take a look at Judo, say in E.J. Harrison's book, and see the same skills mentioned, again with the idea that only a few know them. Same in the Koryu. Same in karate. Same in Taiji, Shaolin arts, Indonesian arts, all the Asian arts. Always the same pattern that some of the skilled at the top know how to do these things, the knowledge is somewhat guarded, and the majority of practitioners don't really know. If you take all the arts and look at the total of all the people that do know, it's a large number of people.... but still the information is relatively scarce. See what I mean?

Regards,

Mike
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Old 05-15-2006, 12:54 PM   #236
Mike Sigman
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

Quote:
Kevin Leavitt wrote:
I suppose I am more aligned with those that can do versus those that can talk. both are important, but I think given the nature of martial arts...it is more about doing and talking than talking alone. I am not insinuating that anyone here is necessarily guilty of that.

The basis of my argument is that "good for them" glad these guys can have push hand competitions. It is important to them. Yes I can learn something from them I am sure. However, when they cross over and start talking about what others are lacking, then they need to be prepared to demonstrate that within the confines of the art or situation in which they say they are judging...or they are simply "college professors" talking about some theories that they themselves cannot back up.
I think I understood your argument the first time, Kevin. You keep making it. In a way, I agree with you, but not fully, because I don't think the same way you do.

Suppose for example that Wendy (I don't know Wendy, but let's assume that she's a normal weight-range, frame-size female) has some bona fide skills in kokyu/jin and ki/qi conditioning. They will, with even moderate training, give her more strength than a comparable female of similar size, musculature, etc. But since I'm about 230 pounds and I have a lot of fighting experience, I can probably take her out fairly quickly. The question is whether I'm smart enough to look at what she does and say, "Hmmmm..... it would definitely be an advantage to have those skills on top of what I can already do" or whether I'm going to say, "Well, she couldn't kick my butt so therefore the stuff she's talking about is useless, just like I suspected."

FWIW

Mike
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Old 05-15-2006, 01:48 PM   #237
Dennis Hooker
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

Quote:
Ron Tisdale wrote:
Hi Kevin,

While I can understand your personal viewpoint, I do have to wonder about something. In the quote above, you refer to "the perfect iriminage, and feeling KI emanating from our finger tips," and equate those things with the "jo trick". It seems to me that that would be a logical fallacy, by your own admission. If so, then why do it? Why trivialize the serious parts of this conversation with the less serious issues which really have not even been posited by anyone here?

It makes your arguement, which without such methods seems fairly strong, rather weak.

Best,
Ron
To see how far and how misguided this can become see the Aikido Journal posts by Brian Kagen on Tom Cameron and George Dillman complete with video. The excuses made for being unable to down a disbelieving reporter and a doubting scientist after the fact are just mind-boggling. I think what is most alarming is that they and their students believe this really works. I have had some hands on experience with these people in the past and I none of it worked on me either.

Dennis Hooker: (DVD) Zanshin and Ma-ai in Aikido
https://www.createspace.com/238049

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Old 05-15-2006, 01:50 PM   #238
Kevin Leavitt
 
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

I got it, and agree. Again, I think it is simply a matter of realitive value and weight that you and I differ on in regards to this topic.
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Old 05-15-2006, 03:57 PM   #239
Jory Boling
 
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

"then c'est la vie ("ch'est la Vye" to you Okies out there)."

thanks for the translation!
- an Okie.
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Old 05-15-2006, 05:08 PM   #240
Chuck Clark
 
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

Jory, I'm an old Okie myself. I understood immediately, even though I had to cheat by living in Paris for three years and overcoming my Okie limitations by learning the lingo.

I hope your Okieness dosen't rub off on the folks in Yokosuka too much. It didn't do too much harm when I was there. The culture most likely won't shudder to a halt while everyone starts rooting for OU or OSU.

Big hint.... learn as much of the lingo, writing as well, while you're there.

Regards,

Chuck Clark
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Old 05-16-2006, 09:28 PM   #241
Upyu
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

Quote:
Kevin Leavitt wrote:
Dan outright says that he knows that if Chuck Liddell mastered "this stuff" that his punches would be more powerful.

No disrespect to Dan, but how would he know what Chuck Liddell has mastered or not mastered? How do you know how many pounds per square inch he is packing in his punch? There is an air of assumption and judgement that does not sit well with me. (Sorry Dan)
Funny thing, you can tell if someone has aspects of these skill or not, just by looking at how they move. I'd agree with Dan in a heartbeat about Chuck Liddel tho.
The movement done when throwing the punches looks entirely different (and I'm not talking technique)

Though, I've seen Rickson Gracie move around in one video, showing how he trains, and I'd say he's got bits and parts of some of the stuff.

Oh oops...maybe its no coincidence that Rickson is starting to stress "flow" and "softness" more in the BJJ that he teaches as well
(Tho, just as irritating is his vagueness at these terms. He doesn't show anyone how he's really training to develop these skills. Tho you see glimpses of it in this one video on the net)
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Old 05-17-2006, 12:11 PM   #242
Kevin Leavitt
 
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

I don't know Rickson, but studying with others in the art of BJJ that I consider to be proficient, I'd guess that he simply trains the same way he always has...that is he does BJJ.

No magic, he probably simply understands more and more everyday that he studies.
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Old 05-17-2006, 02:50 PM   #243
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

I have to agree with Upyu regarding Rickson, in 'Choke', he's clearly doing some solo stuff on the beach that's similar to yoga (not to mention something like a nice Capoeira ginga). Given how many of the Gracies have admitted to training in different things and then later sometimes go on to say, "100% Brazilian Zhoo Zhitsu!" . . . (then we hear wrestling tournaments and sambo matches . . .)

Not that any of it is unrelated . . . I'd argue it's all related . . . but it ain't all just BJJ
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Old 05-17-2006, 04:23 PM   #244
Jory Boling
 
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

Off Thread:
Sensei Clark,

I arrived on the scene, too late. My in-laws were already diehard country fans (hats, boots, buckles, line dancing: the whole deal) by the time I met them.

Also, at the recommendation of a Tulsa dojomate, while working in OKC, I visited Shobu Aiki Dojo. It was my first exposure to a different style of aikido. I remember being pleasantly surprised that, even though it was a different approach, from watching Sensei and his students, it was still the aikido that I had seen, before.

On Thread:
Has anyone training in Japan seen many people demonstrating The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises? If so, were they trying to demonstrate their own power or were they trying to teach it?

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Old 05-17-2006, 05:11 PM   #245
Upyu
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

Quote:
Kevin Leavitt wrote:
I don't know Rickson, but studying with others in the art of BJJ that I consider to be proficient, I'd guess that he simply trains the same way he always has...that is he does BJJ.

No magic, he probably simply understands more and more everyday that he studies.
And I've trained with other people that're "proficient" at BJJ, and while they're good, they DONT move like Rickson
But I do recognize the way Rickson moves in that video (Choke?).

There's a reason Rickson's different from the rest.
Btw, Rickson is a huge Yoga nutcase, and these skills are inherent in yoga if done properly

On a sidenote,
it's funny that while I'd never really done grappling work extensively before, I was able to roll into the local gracie academy here in Tokyo and roll on par with some of the blue belts. (Something I've mentioned in other posts). The skills that Mike, Dan etc have been talking about directly apply to the ground as well
And its a good thing too, otherwise I probably would've had my ass choked out in under 30 seconds if I didn't have a smattering of these skills.
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Old 05-17-2006, 05:12 PM   #246
Upyu
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

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Jory Boling wrote:
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Sensei Clark,

I arrived on the scene, too late. My in-laws were already diehard country fans (hats, boots, buckles, line dancing: the whole deal) by the time I met them.

Also, at the recommendation of a Tulsa dojomate, while working in OKC, I visited Shobu Aiki Dojo. It was my first exposure to a different style of aikido. I remember being pleasantly surprised that, even though it was a different approach, from watching Sensei and his students, it was still the aikido that I had seen, before.

On Thread:
Has anyone training in Japan seen many people demonstrating The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises? If so, were they trying to demonstrate their own power or were they trying to teach it?
Akuzawa here in Tokyo does a version of it, except with a 6 foot long staff, which he holds with his pinky

Same principal tho. And yes he teaches you how to develop this body skill.
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Old 05-17-2006, 07:20 PM   #247
DH
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

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Robert John wrote:
Akuzawa here in Tokyo does a version of it, except with a 6 foot long staff, which he holds with his pinky

Same principal tho. And yes he teaches you how to develop this body skill.
Pinky!!!!

Damn Rob..... I got to get over there and hang with you nut jobs, compare notes, and maybe learn some things. Maybe go out for a drink with you and Ark and have us come to the realization that this body skill, and connection work is just a bunch of hippy Ki crap that is useless in a real fight... riiiight?
.
I hope you're still rolling. I been hanging with some various hooligans here and trying some things myself and in general just having fun.
Fun having so much to still look forward to though...year by year.
Cheers
Dan

Last edited by DH : 05-17-2006 at 07:25 PM.
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Old 05-17-2006, 09:53 PM   #248
Jim Sorrentino
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

Robert,
Quote:
Robert John wrote:
Akuzawa here in Tokyo does a version of it, except with a 6 foot long staff, which he holds with his pinky

Same principal tho. And yes he teaches you how to develop this body skill.
I'll ask you what I have asked Dan H. and others: put a video on YouTube of Akuzawa doing the jo trick (and you, if you can do it), and post the link here. Otherwise, it's just talk.

Jim Sorrentino
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Old 05-17-2006, 09:58 PM   #249
Talon
 
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Dojo: Aikido Tenchi Dojo
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

Quote:
Dan Harden wrote:
Pinky!!!!

....and have us come to the realization that this body skill, and connection work is just a bunch of hippy Ki crap that is useless in a real fight... riiiight?
Dan I believe the proper quote is "some fu$#ing hippy Bulls#it chi"
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Old 05-18-2006, 12:27 AM   #250
Jory Boling
 
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Re: The "Jo Trick" and Similar Exercises

Quote:
Robert John wrote:
Akuzawa here in Tokyo does a version of it, except with a 6 foot long staff, which he holds with his pinky

Same principal tho. And yes he teaches you how to develop this body skill.

Hi and thanks for the reply. Where does Akuzawa Sensei teach and how can one watch or participate in a class. Other than the unbendable arm, I have no experience in any "fu$#ing hippy Bulls#it chi" tricks. I also have little experience in Tokyo.

Please email me, I'd like to know more! As Mike Sigman has suggested, "go find someone and learn."

Jory
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