Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > General

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 12-05-2009, 03:25 PM   #26
dalen7
 
dalen7's Avatar
Dojo: Karcag Aikido Club
Location: Karcag
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 750
Hungary
Offline
Re: End of the road for Aikido Training

Quote:
Keith Larman wrote: View Post
So... Take a deep breath, figure out what you want and need, and then go get it. The rest, in the end, isn't your problem.
Most definitely Keith...

And Ron - good sig.

Peace

dAlen

dAlen [day•lynn]
dum spiro spero - {While I have breathe - I have hope}

Art
http://www.lightofinfinity.org

Philosophical
http://dalen7.wordpress.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2009, 04:05 PM   #27
Victoria Pitt
Dojo: Shinjinkai, Chicago, IL
Location: Chicago, IL
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 82
United_States
Offline
Re: End of the road for Aikido Training

Here is where I jump in and spit out something-

Anything worth having in this world you've got to work for. Most things that you want are there to get if you go out there and figure out a way to make it happen.

I don't know how many times in my life people have gotten in my way, told me that I can't do something, that I shouldn't do something, that something isn't going to happen.

And then I prove them wrong. If I want something, as Keith said "go and get it". No one is more interested in your progress and your development than you are. You are your won advocate.

It looks like you are finding a way to get around the roadblocks... good.

As I said, before, I don't get too much into the Yoda aspects of Aikido- they kind of wig me out but I respect others who are into that. That being said, I think I read it from O'Sensei's Art of Peace or maybe it was a Zen book, or maybe Yoda really did say this in a movie- You've got to be like water.. go over, around and through. You seem to be doing this by finding an alternative method to get the training you want. I'm a little nobody, but I do know that so long as you are proactive in your development and going for what you want, you're going grow, and you're going to get what you want. Maybe not tomorrow, maybe not a month from now, maybe not three years from now, but if you want it, you'll figure out a way to get it.

I won't say good luck because luck has nothing to do with this, so I will wish you well in your task.

~Do one thing each day that scares you...~
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2009, 04:32 PM   #28
dalen7
 
dalen7's Avatar
Dojo: Karcag Aikido Club
Location: Karcag
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 750
Hungary
Offline
Re: End of the road for Aikido Training

Quote:
Victoria Pitt wrote: View Post
Maybe not tomorrow, maybe not a month from now, maybe not three years from now, but if you want it, you'll figure out a way to get it.

I won't say good luck because luck has nothing to do with this, so I will wish you well in your task.
Yes indeed, the virtue of patience and enjoying what is currently happening now in order for more to flow in is what Im currently dealing with. [easier said than done, easier to stay in old set patterns, but yes your correct, we do set our own paths, and that is what needs to be the focus...]

Hey... Yoda is cool!
["fear leads to anger, anger leads to hate, hate leads to suffering" - which then leads to peace once you realize you dont need to suffer anymore.]

The bit about the water may be multi sourced, but one famous person who said it was Bruce Lee. [seems I was pondering this before I heard him mention it, who knows maybe its that collective conscious bit going on... or maybe I shouldnt be writing past midnight!]

Anyway, thank you for your comments and passion!
[sorry for my late night ramble]

Peace

dAlen

p.s.
I relate to your "showing people they are wrong" when it comes to showing that you can do what you set out to do, despite their unbelief.

Its strange how this happens that people put limitations on others, yet that is really our own limitations speaking when we do this -

At one point the realization of the truth that really anything is possible, well it kind of voided any naysayers - it was like a light shining that said, "they just havent experienced enough in life yet to realize the potential."

Once I realized this, didnt matter as much to prove others one way or another.
Suppose the only person Im still trying to prove something to is myself... kind of an irony in a way.
Guess thats who we really try to prove something to when we try to prove to others we can.

Again, late night thoughts, may not be coherent... just throwing thoughts as they come to mind...

Last edited by dalen7 : 12-05-2009 at 04:44 PM.

dAlen [day•lynn]
dum spiro spero - {While I have breathe - I have hope}

Art
http://www.lightofinfinity.org

Philosophical
http://dalen7.wordpress.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2009, 04:24 AM   #29
Eva Antonia
Dojo: CERIA
Location: Brussels
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 211
Belgium
Offline
Re: End of the road for Aikido Training

Dear Dalen,

I think I know your frustration - went through very similar ones myself.
I started training in November 2006, much too late in life and VERY determined to advance and be shodan before leaving Belgium (had a 4 years' contract but still am here)...

Well, some three months after my start a major demolition & rehabilitation was undertaken in our dojo and we were forced to pack our mats and continue training in the bar above the swimming pool - very restreint space and continuous sauna heat. That should last 3 months but did, due to bad construction and subsequent demolition of the construction, last more than a year. Our head instructor bargained with the administration of the building that we should pay less as the room was so very bad.

In meanwhile some persons left the dojo, among these one of our three instructors. When we got back our REAL, very beautiful dojo, our head instructor, who had 82 years at that time, could come less and less due to health reasons and at last was forced to give up. We were then left with the kids' instructors, who had time twice a week, and he could not really attend to us, as we trained parallel to the kids. We had one 1st kyu who replaced him but then got a very demanding job and could not come as often as it was required. This situation continued during ONE YEAR. Half of the club left, and sometimes we were left to train among ourselves, that is, lower kyus. The upper ones were too frustrated with their slow progress and just went to other dojos. Our old head instructor tried to find a replacement of his level, but that took time. Certainly, during all that time we continued to pay our fees, as the dojo rent had to be paid, and I strongly suspect that our old headmaster filled the gap between that rent and our sparse contributions only not to have to see his club close down.

In addition to this, three months a year the dojo is closed as it is in a university building which is closed during school vacations. I always recompensated that with training abroad.

Then, in January of this year we got a new instructor who fusioned his old club with ours, and now everything is going well. But then in June I got a rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament of my left knee, got operated in September, and here I am in another round of stagnation.

But I never saw that as a reason to abandon aikido or even only to change the dojo. I just thought, I like it so very much that I stick to it as long and as much as is possible. If it takes more time to advance than I thought then so be it. If I don't advance in rank then still I have the impression to advance in understanding. That's not so very bad at all.

So, if I may give you an advice from my perspective - the only way to solve the problem is perseverance. Just continue to train

Best regards,

Eva
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2009, 06:16 AM   #30
lbb
Location: Massachusetts
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 3,184
United_States
Offline
Re: End of the road for Aikido Training

Quote:
Victoria Pitt wrote: View Post
Anything worth having in this world you've got to work for. Most things that you want are there to get if you go out there and figure out a way to make it happen...

I won't say good luck because luck has nothing to do with this, so I will wish you well in your task.
Luck actually has a great deal to do with it. Those of us who are privileged to live comfortable and safe lives are indeed fortunate, as there are so many people in the world who must work hard for mere survival. Even for those of us who have options and opportunities in our lives, it is more than simply "go[ing] out there and figur[ing] out a way to make it happen." Realistically, we must recognize that while we may have choices, "all of the above" is rarely an option -- or as a friend of mine says, "You can have anything; you can't have everything." Desire and hard work don't overcome the constraints of space and time, they merely make our choices clear -- but only if we can get beyond the belief that all we have to do is "work for" it.

If you want to practice aikido but don't have a convenient dojo with a good teacher, you still have the choice to train, but you will have to give up other things. You will have to choose between the time spent training and traveling, and time spent with family and friends. You may find that you can train, but only if you relocate closer to your dojo, or that you can only train if you get a different job that is closer to the dojo or that has some schedule flexibility. The money that you spend on traveling to the dojo is money that you can't spend on something else. This is what it means by "work[ing] for it": it's not some abstract and romanticized no-pain-no-gain pastiche from a martial arts movie. It's sacrifice of time and money. It's giving up other aspects of your life. It's deciding whether the price that you will have to pay is one that you can bear -- and that price is different for everyone.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2009, 09:00 AM   #31
Victoria Pitt
Dojo: Shinjinkai, Chicago, IL
Location: Chicago, IL
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 82
United_States
Offline
Re: End of the road for Aikido Training

Quote:
Mary Malmros wrote: View Post
Luck actually has a great deal to do with it. Those of us who are privileged to live comfortable and safe lives are indeed fortunate, as there are so many people in the world who must work hard for mere survival. Even for those of us who have options and opportunities in our lives, it is more than simply "go[ing] out there and figur[ing] out a way to make it happen." Realistically, we must recognize that while we may have choices, "all of the above" is rarely an option -- or as a friend of mine says, "You can have anything; you can't have everything." Desire and hard work don't overcome the constraints of space and time, they merely make our choices clear -- but only if we can get beyond the belief that all we have to do is "work for" it.
I am trying to figure out where luck has to come into play with anything Dalen had to say. And what does luck have to do with leading a good life? Especially in Dalen's situation, licking a finger, sticking it in the wind, and hoping fortune smiles on him isn't going to help him. He does have choices, and clearly from his post, he's going out there and grabbing the bull by the horns and making is choice happen. Excellent. He's got drive, and gumption. That's 80% of it right there. The extra 20% is building on that momentum.

Maybe "luck" is who separates the "haves" and "have nots". People who make no effort for themselves to get where they want to be in life and hope some magic force helps them out? Well there chances of getting in a better situation or getting what they want are very slim indeed. To the brave person who says "To hell with luck, and magic and potions and lotions, I want this, and I am going to make it happen." Well, they go far in this world... or at least further than whatever lot they were born into.

Does luck help you avoid a strike from uke in Aikido? Does luck help you get an A on an exam? No, practice and interest and effort give you rewards. There are ALWAYS choices- maybe not the choices that you like, or the best one at the moment, but there is always a choice, and with that choice another door opens until you can position yourself where you want to be.

Money, age, time? Cop outs. Buy into the status quo and what society tries to shove down your throat, may as well curl up and die now. What's the point in your life if you're not going to live it and wait for some angel to float you over that sea instead of looking for some wood and building a boat?

~Do one thing each day that scares you...~
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2009, 10:09 AM   #32
dalen7
 
dalen7's Avatar
Dojo: Karcag Aikido Club
Location: Karcag
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 750
Hungary
Offline
Re: End of the road for Aikido Training

Quote:
Eva Röben wrote: View Post
So, if I may give you an advice from my perspective - the only way to solve the problem is perseverance. Just continue to train

Best regards,

Eva
Wow, just wanted to say that was quite a story, thanks for sharing... hope things work out with the new set up.

Peace

dAlen

dAlen [day•lynn]
dum spiro spero - {While I have breathe - I have hope}

Art
http://www.lightofinfinity.org

Philosophical
http://dalen7.wordpress.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2009, 10:15 AM   #33
lbb
Location: Massachusetts
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 3,184
United_States
Offline
Re: End of the road for Aikido Training

Victoria, the problem that I have with catch-phrases like "you can get it if you really want" is that they suggest that any obstacle can be overcome. While you could argue that this is hypothetically true, as someone who has many more options, comfort and safety than 99% of the world, I feel that obstacles should be acknowledged, as well as the costs that people must pay if they are to overcome them.

I also feel that it's important to recognize that a trivial obstacle to someone who has ample resources, may be practically insurmountable for someone who has less. Resources and circumstances are largely a matter of luck: it was luck, not work and not virtue, that caused me to be born a member of an ethnic group tat is not persecuted, in a country where my ability to work, freely associate and travel are restricted because of my gender, to parents who respect education and fostered learning. The resources and opportunities that I have now owe far more to those strokes of luck than they do to any efforts on my part. I dislike seeing people who are among the "have nots" automatically labeled as "mak[ing] no effort for themselves to get where they want to be in life and hop[ing] some magic force helps them out".

Aside from the difference in opportunities and resources that people have available to them, it's also the case that costs are not uniform. Lack of money, health problems, or time are not "cop outs", they're limitations -- sometimes they can be overcome, and sometimes they can't. What's chicken feed to you might be a big chunk of the monthly budget to someone else. What's easy for you might be agonizing effort for someone else, and perhaps detrimental to their health. Time that you can spare may be time that someone else needs to care for a child or an elderly parent. "Just do it" arguments fail in the face of the truth that money and time are finite. Not everybody has the wood to build the boat of your metaphor. When that's the case, I don't like to see such people scorned as "wait[ing] for some angel to float you over the sea". Some people, in some circumstances, have no choice but to remain on land.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2009, 10:49 AM   #34
Victoria Pitt
Dojo: Shinjinkai, Chicago, IL
Location: Chicago, IL
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 82
United_States
Offline
Re: End of the road for Aikido Training

Quote:
Mary Malmros wrote: View Post
Victoria, the problem that I have with catch-phrases like "you can get it if you really want" is that they suggest that any obstacle can be overcome. While you could argue that this is hypothetically true, as someone who has many more options, comfort and safety than 99% of the world, I feel that obstacles should be acknowledged, as well as the costs that people must pay if they are to overcome them.

I also feel that it's important to recognize that a trivial obstacle to someone who has ample resources, may be practically insurmountable for someone who has less. Resources and circumstances are largely a matter of luck: it was luck, not work and not virtue, that caused me to be born a member of an ethnic group tat is not persecuted, in a country where my ability to work, freely associate and travel are restricted because of my gender, to parents who respect education and fostered learning. The resources and opportunities that I have now owe far more to those strokes of luck than they do to any efforts on my part. I dislike seeing people who are among the "have nots" automatically labeled as "mak[ing] no effort for themselves to get where they want to be in life and hop[ing] some magic force helps them out".

Aside from the difference in opportunities and resources that people have available to them, it's also the case that costs are not uniform. Lack of money, health problems, or time are not "cop outs", they're limitations -- sometimes they can be overcome, and sometimes they can't. What's chicken feed to you might be a big chunk of the monthly budget to someone else. What's easy for you might be agonizing effort for someone else, and perhaps detrimental to their health. Time that you can spare may be time that someone else needs to care for a child or an elderly parent. "Just do it" arguments fail in the face of the truth that money and time are finite. Not everybody has the wood to build the boat of your metaphor. When that's the case, I don't like to see such people scorned as "wait[ing] for some angel to float you over the sea". Some people, in some circumstances, have no choice but to remain on land.
BS. BS. BS. Lack of Money, Health Problems have nothing to do with "luck". Some things are as they are. You were given a brain to use to see what you can make of your situation. Just because life isn't easy doesn't make things impossible. Just because you CHOOSE not to do something because of extraneous reasons is a CHOICE. Sacrifice is a part of life. Again, you see kids come from the worst ghettos this world has to offer and they become inventors, leaders, artist, etc... It takes some momentum and belief on their part in themselves, to the exclusion of those extraneous reasons you previously mentioned as roadblocks. No one is going pay attention to someone sitting in a corner making mud pies and wishing and hoping on a little star.

Life's IS fair. It is what it is... what you do and the choices you make with what you're given is the name of the game. If you can't walk, you crawl, if you can't crawl, you claw your way forward and keep trying to figure out a way. Life is NOT easy. Choices are sometimes HARD, but at the end of the day it's a choice.

And I dislike people saying that if you're born under bad circumstances that there is no hope for you because you're "unlucky" to have been born that way. You are born but what happens after that, after you get to the age where you can take care of yourself, listen, learn, is up to you.

No one is born under a black star where the world is impossible. I never said that it would be easy- not once. But I did say you've got to get off your ass and try or there is no hope for you and you may as well roll over and die instead of whine about how come you didn't get the silver spoon in your mouth. I never said its all or nothing... sacrifice is a big part of life, but just because you need to sacrifice doesn't mean that you're unlucky.

The wood is there if you're smart enough and open enough to find it.

~Do one thing each day that scares you...~
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2009, 11:16 AM   #35
Stormcrow34
Dojo: Yoseikan Budo
Location: Florida
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 96
United_States
Offline
Re: End of the road for Aikido Training

I've heard that you learn in survival training that as long as you maintain hope and stay focused on completing tasks to stay alive, your chances of surviving increase exponentially.

Hope is good. Apathy is bad.

Last edited by Stormcrow34 : 12-07-2009 at 11:18 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2009, 11:25 AM   #36
maynard
Dojo: St. Pete Aikikai
Location: Pinellas Park, FL
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 38
Offline
Re: End of the road for Aikido Training

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genie_(feral_child)

The notion that "You can do anything" makes some presumptions in my opinion. I don't really have time for a detailed response, and this may come across as much more harsh than intended... <shrug>.

I wish dAlen the best on his continued training and I hope it works out.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2009, 11:35 AM   #37
thisisnotreal
 
thisisnotreal's Avatar
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 694
Offline
Re: End of the road for Aikido Training

Hi Mary, I thought that was a beautiful post and a good reminder for me. Thank you. Josh
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2009, 12:04 PM   #38
Stormcrow34
Dojo: Yoseikan Budo
Location: Florida
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 96
United_States
Offline
Re: End of the road for Aikido Training

Quote:
John Murray wrote: View Post
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genie_(feral_child)

The notion that "You can do anything" makes some presumptions in my opinion. I don't really have time for a detailed response, and this may come across as much more harsh than intended... <shrug>.

I wish dAlen the best on his continued training and I hope it works out.
Sure, in situations like this extreme example of Genie, there are obstacles that are very difficult or impossible to overcome. But generally speaking, I believe that where there is a will, there is often a way.

Good luck Dalen, I'm sure you'll be fine.

P.S. Having cartilege scooped out of your nose is never fun, I hope you feel better soon.

Last edited by Stormcrow34 : 12-07-2009 at 12:18 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2009, 02:12 PM   #39
dalen7
 
dalen7's Avatar
Dojo: Karcag Aikido Club
Location: Karcag
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 750
Hungary
Offline
Re: End of the road for Aikido Training

Quote:
Michael Crowell wrote: View Post
Good luck Dalen, I'm sure you'll be fine.
Quote:
John Murray wrote: View Post
I wish dAlen the best on his continued training and I hope it works out.
Thanks guys...

Today was variety day - it was grappling at Thai Boxing.
[We do MMA with Thai Boxing as the focus.]

I have in mind to get some of the guys from Aikido to put on my boxing gloves and have a go at me so I can practice a more live AIkido. [Me no gloves - I wont hit, but it will allow them not to feel bad about hitting me.]

Things do work out, Im actually getting what I wanted in a weird, indirect way - in a ton of life lessons and the understanding of people skills as well. [Nothing like learning in a language that isnt your mother toungue... makes deep communication even tougher - think how often we misunderstand each other when we speak the same tounge!

Tomorrow I will go to AIkido and see what happens with the payment bit... Dont know that I can or want to keep up doing both Aikido and Thai boxing, at least not a full weeks worth, but maybe up until I get more agile, flexible, and get the rhythm of things - then I can re-evaluate and take things from there.

As the old saying goes - step by step...

Peace

dAlen

dAlen [day•lynn]
dum spiro spero - {While I have breathe - I have hope}

Art
http://www.lightofinfinity.org

Philosophical
http://dalen7.wordpress.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2009, 10:03 PM   #40
Shannon Frye
Dojo: Aikido Fellowship of VA / Chesapeake Va
Location: Virginia
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 184
United_States
Offline
Re: End of the road for Aikido Training

Best of LUCK !!!!

(I'm Irish - it's my ethnic RIGHT to say that!)

"In the end there can be only one"

www.AikidoFellowship.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2009, 03:42 AM   #41
dalen7
 
dalen7's Avatar
Dojo: Karcag Aikido Club
Location: Karcag
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 750
Hungary
Offline
Re: End of the road for Aikido Training

Quote:
Shannon Frye wrote: View Post
Best of LUCK !!!!

(I'm Irish - it's my ethnic RIGHT to say that!)
Thank you Shannon.

Peace

dAlen

dAlen [day•lynn]
dum spiro spero - {While I have breathe - I have hope}

Art
http://www.lightofinfinity.org

Philosophical
http://dalen7.wordpress.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2009, 05:04 AM   #42
Maarten De Queecker
Dojo: Aikikai Gent, Brugse Aikido Vereniging
Location: Bruges
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 139
Belgium
Offline
Re: End of the road for Aikido Training

Quote:
Dalen Johnson wrote: View Post
Thanks guys...

Today was variety day - it was grappling at Thai Boxing.
[We do MMA with Thai Boxing as the focus.]

I have in mind to get some of the guys from Aikido to put on my boxing gloves and have a go at me so I can practice a more live AIkido. [Me no gloves - I wont hit, but it will allow them not to feel bad about hitting me.]

Things do work out, Im actually getting what I wanted in a weird, indirect way - in a ton of life lessons and the understanding of people skills as well. [Nothing like learning in a language that isnt your mother toungue... makes deep communication even tougher - think how often we misunderstand each other when we speak the same tounge!

Tomorrow I will go to AIkido and see what happens with the payment bit... Dont know that I can or want to keep up doing both Aikido and Thai boxing, at least not a full weeks worth, but maybe up until I get more agile, flexible, and get the rhythm of things - then I can re-evaluate and take things from there.

As the old saying goes - step by step...

Peace

dAlen
Aikido with boxing gloves.. bad idea IMHO. It gets kind of difficult to do certain wrist locks when a person is wearing gloves.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2009, 06:52 AM   #43
Stormcrow34
Dojo: Yoseikan Budo
Location: Florida
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 96
United_States
Offline
Re: End of the road for Aikido Training

Quote:
Dalen Johnson wrote: View Post
Thanks guys...

I have in mind to get some of the guys from Aikido to put on my boxing gloves and have a go at me so I can practice a more live AIkido. [Me no gloves - I wont hit, but it will allow them not to feel bad about hitting me.]

dAlen
I think it's a great idea to step out of your comfort zone now and then. I would definitely not hesitate to intermittently trade in kote gaeshi, for a more pressurized, uncomfortable environment. Having real, fast punches coming at you is a great way to focus on aikido tai sabaki. Just don't get hit, and wear your mouth piece....just in case.

Let us know how it works out!

P.S. It's not the lead hand you have to watch out for, it's the one or two that follow it.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2009, 07:29 AM   #44
dalen7
 
dalen7's Avatar
Dojo: Karcag Aikido Club
Location: Karcag
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 750
Hungary
Offline
Re: End of the road for Aikido Training

Quote:
Michael Crowell wrote: View Post
I think it's a great idea to step out of your comfort zone now and then. I would definitely not hesitate to intermittently trade in kote gaeshi, for a more pressurized, uncomfortable environment. Having real, fast punches coming at you is a great way to focus on aikido tai sabaki. Just don't get hit, and wear your mouth piece....just in case.

Let us know how it works out!

P.S. It's not the lead hand you have to watch out for, it's the one or two that follow it.
totally right about the mouth piece - we were playing around with grappling at Thai Boxing last night, and I should have put my mouth piece in, because at one point my teeth 'ground' against each other.

Also, I agree it should help with the tai sabaki. [the fast punches.]

Quote:
Maarten De Queecker wrote: View Post
Aikido with boxing gloves.. bad idea IMHO. It gets kind of difficult to do certain wrist locks when a person is wearing gloves.
I understand the concern, I did a little experiment with it and interestingly enough not as bad as you might initially think.
[I have been working on perfecting a technique to catch & pin if the hand were to miss, so I utilize my forearm with body weight a lot, and it seems to work. Mileage may very, but I like it.]

Actually had a higher kyu rank tell me not to do it as it was not proper, but for me its about what works - and thats what I have been experimenting with in Aikido since I started. [After all Aikido is about the possibilities, and I look at it as a getting to know what I naturally am inclined to do which is beneficial, etc., as we all have our own unique abilities/attributes which can help us out.]

Peace

dAlen

Last edited by dalen7 : 12-08-2009 at 07:33 AM.

dAlen [day•lynn]
dum spiro spero - {While I have breathe - I have hope}

Art
http://www.lightofinfinity.org

Philosophical
http://dalen7.wordpress.com
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2009, 11:46 AM   #45
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
Offline
Re: End of the road for Aikido Training

Quote:
to the exclusion of those extraneous reasons you previously mentioned as roadblocks.
Lessee...so...you mean extraneous reasons like a bullet to the brain? Or a house fire? Or, say, getting lynched because you are gay or black? Little, no count, extranious things like that?

Sorry, that was probably a little too snippy. I guess I agree with both you and Mary...in some ways. You can definately reduce the effect of chance through hard work, staying out of bad places as best as possible, etc. But sometimes...stuff just happens. And more stuff is likely to happen in some places as opposed to others. And not everyone can just get up and move. And even if you do...a truck runs a stop sign and BAM. Just by chance, you are the one hit.

That may not be luck, or lack of it, but what ever you call it, pull yourself up by the bootstraps just ain't gonna get it.

Best,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
  Reply With Quote

Please visit our sponsor:

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!



Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
George's Short Guide to Cross Training George S. Ledyard External Aikido Blog Posts 2 06-11-2009 02:42 PM
Transmission, Inheritance, Emulation 12 Peter Goldsbury Columns 32 05-16-2009 06:05 PM
Knife Randori Videos ChrisHein Training 308 05-10-2008 02:07 PM
Resistance training overview: the four basic levels G DiPierro Training 17 11-04-2007 03:18 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:45 PM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2018 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2018 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate