Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > General

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 11-20-2007, 06:02 PM   #1
Conrad Gus
 
Conrad Gus's Avatar
Dojo: Victoria Family Aikido
Location: Victoria, BC
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 268
Canada
Offline
When do people start to "get it"?

We seem to all agree that rank is somewhat artificial and fairly relative. Given that limitation of rank as a comparison, I'm interested in people's response to the following question:

At what rank (or time put in) do you think people generally start to achieve a level of proficiency in aikido where they can just do techniques without struggling to make them work or remember the details. I'm thinking of those folks who just seem to move naturally and comfortably without leaving a lot of openings and with a decent level of internal power (without necessarily being expert or master level).

It's probably different for everybody, but I've heard from one shihan that real effectiveness starts creeping in around sandan. That's roughly in line with my experience as well.

What do you think?
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2007, 06:04 PM   #2
SeiserL
 
SeiserL's Avatar
Location: Florida Gulf coast
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 3,886
United_States
Offline
Re: When do people start to "get it"?

I am still waiting.
But I think you start looking forward to it after shodan.

Lynn Seiser PhD
Yondan Aikido & FMA/JKD
We do not rise to the level of our expectations, but fall to the level of our training. Train well. KWATZ!
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2007, 06:21 PM   #3
crbateman
  AikiWeb Forums Contributing Member
 
crbateman's Avatar
Location: Orlando, FL
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 1,502
Offline
Re: When do people start to "get it"?

Everybody's different... Don't measure yourself through others' accomplishments. I have started to "get it", but I fully expect that I will never truly "make the trip". That, however, will not keep me from trying...
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2007, 06:27 PM   #4
Conrad Gus
 
Conrad Gus's Avatar
Dojo: Victoria Family Aikido
Location: Victoria, BC
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 268
Canada
Offline
Re: When do people start to "get it"?

Quote:
Clark Bateman wrote: View Post
Everybody's different... Don't measure yourself through others' accomplishments. I have started to "get it", but I fully expect that I will never truly "make the trip". That, however, will not keep me from trying...
Okay. I suspect you might have already "got it", based on my definition. You are very humble!

I'm not really talking about O-Sensei levels here -- just a good solid aikido foundation where you can start exploring higher levels. I'm thinking about the top 1-5% at a major seminar that just feel really fluid and natural.

My gut feel is that it is sometime after shodan for most of us. Until then we're too busy thinking about techniques!
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2007, 08:02 PM   #5
Aikibu
Dojo: West Wind Dojo Santa Monica California
Location: Malibu, California
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,295
United_States
Offline
Re: When do people start to "get it"?

Perhaps I am a slow learner but if you're talking about Aiki I am up for Sandan this year I am just now getting the Aiki Equation...The techniques were easy for me...using the techniques with Aiki under duress took about 12 years to really get good....Seminars are a not good measurement for me I prefer to see Aiki work in "sync" with other Martial Arts...

William Hazen
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2007, 08:46 PM   #6
Rupert Atkinson
 
Rupert Atkinson's Avatar
Dojo: Wherever I am.
Location: New Zealand
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 987
United Kingdom
Offline
Re: When do people start to "get it"?

It's not a 'rank' question. Rank has nothing to do with it. Basically, some learn faster than others but 'to get it' they have to train seriously and think hard for a long period of time. And then, there is no gurantee they will ever get it. Simply, the journey has to be enjoyable - then, it doesn't really matter. The problem is, just what is that "it"??? Go ask a few seniors - I bet they can't tell you.

  Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2007, 08:58 PM   #7
David Yap
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 561
Malaysia
Offline
Re: When do people start to "get it"?

Quote:
Conrad Gustafson wrote: View Post
We seem to all agree that rank is somewhat artificial and fairly relative. Given that limitation of rank as a comparison, I'm interested in people's response to the following question:

At what rank (or time put in) do you think people generally start to achieve a level of proficiency in aikido where they can just do techniques without struggling to make them work or remember the details. I'm thinking of those folks who just seem to move naturally and comfortably without leaving a lot of openings and with a decent level of internal power (without necessarily being expert or master level).

It's probably different for everybody, but I've heard from one shihan that real effectiveness starts creeping in around sandan. That's roughly in line with my experience as well.

What do you think?
Hi Conrad,

I will get a lot flacks from the local community for this post. Based on your criteria (underlined above), I don't have certainty that real effectiveness do start creeping in at about sandan. When one gets it, then the effectiveness remains there period (right?). Observing the various instructors (4~5th dan) in training and in public demo over the years, I am not too sure. Some do improve overtime but some just don't and in fact they decline. The pitfall, IMHO, is that they are not training enough and they start to believe in their own instructions.

"Getting it" and "getting it precisely" are separate motivations.

Just my two sens.

Regards

David Y
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2007, 09:55 PM   #8
David Yap
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 561
Malaysia
Offline
Re: When do people start to "get it"?

Quote:
Rupert Atkinson wrote: View Post
...The problem is, just what is that "it"??? Go ask a few seniors - I bet they can't tell you.
Generally I can say "It" is "Respect". "It" is always the ego that goes with the rank and seniority. "It" is not giving the opportunity/allowing ones students or juniors to stand on ones shoulders. The objective of being skillful/precision is seldom part of the "It".

For example. While training at a dojo I visited, the instructor came over to correct my form despite my "effortless" motions. Later after class ended, an friend of mine who is a regular at that dojo requested me to help him in suwariwaza kokyu-ho. Instructor came over to us and remarked "Aikido is formless". His definitions of "form" and "formless" is of his whim and fancy. I "got" the message of course but his student got something else.

I do agree with Rupert on the "It" of "Getting It" - a lot of seniors just can't tell you what is it. The sad part of it is that it rubs off on the students.

David Y
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2007, 03:02 AM   #9
eyrie
 
eyrie's Avatar
Location: Summerholm, Queensland
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 1,126
Australia
Offline
Re: When do people start to "get it"?

Like Rupert said, it's not a rank or time question. You either get it or you don't. I don't think there is such a thing as "starting to get it". And then there are different levels or layers of understanding. As you as you think you "got it", another layer reveals itself and what you think you "got", isn't "it"...

Ignatius
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2007, 05:01 AM   #10
roadster
 
roadster's Avatar
Dojo: Aikido of Santa Barbara
Location: Santa Barbara, California
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 94
United_States
Offline
Re: When do people start to "get it"?

I will never get it. But I sometimes understand it. Most of the time I pretend to get it. And ultimately end up just doing it.

I comes in waves. Like dropping into a wave and you're in the zone. Then the ride is over and it's back to square one. (at least with me)
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2007, 06:06 AM   #11
Peter Seth
Dojo: Zanshin. Sunderland University
Location: Sunderland
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 124
England
Offline
Re: When do people start to "get it"?

"Getting it" and "getting it precisely" are separate motivations.

Hi david. Precision/precisely - 'MMMM'? Not sure that word belongs in aikido - more of an organic, everchanging art where feel, flow and spirit are the essence. You try for precision and 'you'll be lucky'! Its an art not a science. Science, mechanics and maths can describe it I suppose, but the 'art' is intrinsic and that is never precise by definition. Pete.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2007, 07:16 AM   #12
Marc Abrams
Dojo: Aikido Arts of Shin Budo Kai/ Bedford Hills, New York
Location: New York
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 1,302
United_States
Offline
Re: When do people start to "get it"?

I do not view this as an all or none process, but akin to polishing the stone. How smooth can it ever be? My experience has been on toiling up-hill in my training. I then face a portal and struggle mightily to get through. On day, the portal has opened and my Aikido has suddenly transformed itself. I am amazed at the minor enlightenment that I have experienced. I have to relearn everything that I have done up to that point. I then find myself moving up hill again until I confront the next portal........

Good luck on your path!

Marc Abrams
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2007, 07:24 AM   #13
gdandscompserv
 
gdandscompserv's Avatar
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 1,214
United_States
Offline
Re: When do people start to "get it"?

Quote:
Conrad Gustafson wrote: View Post
We seem to all agree
Since when?
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2007, 09:05 AM   #14
Dirk Hanss
 
Dirk Hanss's Avatar
Dojo: Aikidoschule Trier
Location: Merzkirchen
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 471
Germany
Offline
Re: When do people start to "get it"?

As you asked "start toget it",...
Well to "get it" is a gift and anyone can get it at any time. And yes I have seen people below, even well below shodan, who could move me so easily without even thinking of doing a perfect technique. So a kind of bad technique but perfectly done.

But there is good reason for sandan. Most people do those easy-looking techniques, which make uke feel like dream, when they stop thinking about how to perform a technique. And they stop thinking about all these technical details, when they are not always bothered with comments like "no, don't do this", "don't you remember, how to do xyz", etc. And as nobody really performs a perfect technique, this happens, when the shihan expects them to go beyond form and do the technique or and technique in any way it comes. And this is often the sandan level.

And the same arguments hold for why most of those gifted people stopo doing their wonderfully performed wrong techniques after a while. They can do it but they are not allowed to.

Just a few observations from a little nikyu.

Dirk
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2007, 09:18 AM   #15
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
Offline
Re: When do people start to "get it"?

People actually get it? Hmmm...I'm just thick headed I think.

Sometimes I'll have a very easy time of "it" in the morning, and yet when I try again in the afternoon, nothing is there. Can't even break the balance of the brown belts.

Longer I train, less of a clue. I remember (and can go back and read posts) when I thought I had some understanding.

Now I try to focus on doing the best I can in this moment. Sometimes it clicks, sometimes not. Trying to find ways to make it more consistent. No more testing until the consistency is there...

Best,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2007, 09:45 AM   #16
David Yap
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 561
Malaysia
Offline
Re: When do people start to "get it"?

Quote:
Peter Seth wrote: View Post
"Getting it" and "getting it precisely" are separate motivations.

Hi david. Precision/precisely - 'MMMM'? Not sure that word belongs in aikido - more of an organic, everchanging art where feel, flow and spirit are the essence. You try for precision and 'you'll be lucky'! Its an art not a science. Science, mechanics and maths can describe it I suppose, but the 'art' is intrinsic and that is never precise by definition. Pete.
Hi Peter,

Tell that to the Yoshinkan boys. For an uke, falling 5 degree off angle can cause one to be expelled from the dojo

David Y

It is better to read a book a hundred times than reading a hundred books at one time

Last edited by David Yap : 11-21-2007 at 09:48 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2007, 09:56 AM   #17
George S. Ledyard
 
George S. Ledyard's Avatar
Dojo: Aikido Eastside
Location: Bellevue, WA
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 2,670
Offline
Re: When do people start to "get it"?

Quote:
Rupert Atkinson wrote: View Post
It's not a 'rank' question. Rank has nothing to do with it. Basically, some learn faster than others but 'to get it' they have to train seriously and think hard for a long period of time. And then, there is no guarantee they will ever get it. Simply, the journey has to be enjoyable - then, it doesn't really matter. The problem is, just what is that "it"??? Go ask a few seniors - I bet they can't tell you.
Rupert's right. There is no "when" you get "it". There's a virtually infinite range punctuated with plateaus where you make breakthroughs. Each time I have made a major breakthrough, I have looked back and said to myself "My God, I didn't have a clue before..." And then, as I continue to seek more knowledge and meet and train with folks who are truly amazing I realize that I barely have a clue now.

The more I train, the more I realize there is to know. I look back and remember when I thought that what was "out there" was bounded, that there were actually folks who had gotten "it". I know better now.

Most folks get to a certain point and they simply stop getting better. That might be San Dan or Yondan for some, Rokudan for others, Shihan for still others, but at some point they stop trying.

But when you run into folks who are at what we see as the highest levels and they are still training and progressing... well, it's humbling. The higher the level of skill, the bigger the trap. There are fewer and fewer people who know what you know, still fewer who know what you don't know... it's so easy to simply start dispensing ones knowledge and cease seeking for oneself.

Often, when the top people cease progressing, their limitations become the ceiling beyond which their students will not be allowed to progress. One can see this organizationally.... the top guy's Aikido hasn't changed one iota in thirty years... so the members of that organization are told not to train outside so they won't see what is really out there. The limitations of the top guy become institutionalized. It becomes impossible for anyone to become better than his teacher. Even aspiring to be better than ones teacher is considered sort of heretical.

If you get out and see what is out there... train with folks like Ryabko and Vasiliev in the Systema, play with people like Akuzawa and Mike Sigman, put your hands on teachers like Kuroda and Angier... you realize that there is a virtually infinite vista before you of physical, mental, and technical development. If you look around you can see that in almost any area you could name, there is someone who has taken his skills to a level that seems almost incomprehensible. No one ever masters it all, ever.

So get used to the feeling that you have no clue... become friends with that feeling. Being willing to accept that fact as you get more and more knowledge is what will allow you to keep developing until you pass out of this life.

George S. Ledyard
Aikido Eastside
Bellevue, WA
Aikido Eastside
AikidoDvds.Com
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2007, 10:08 AM   #18
Conrad Gus
 
Conrad Gus's Avatar
Dojo: Victoria Family Aikido
Location: Victoria, BC
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 268
Canada
Offline
Re: When do people start to "get it"?

Quote:
Rupert Atkinson wrote: View Post
It's not a 'rank' question. Rank has nothing to do with it. Basically, some learn faster than others but 'to get it' they have to train seriously and think hard for a long period of time. And then, there is no gurantee they will ever get it. Simply, the journey has to be enjoyable - then, it doesn't really matter. The problem is, just what is that "it"??? Go ask a few seniors - I bet they can't tell you.
Rupert,

I think this is very insightful. I agree completely that it is not a rank question -- I was just thinking of rank as one way that we can kind of point to how long a person has been training.

Just an observation -- it seems like people are being awfully hard on themselves. Don't you have days when aikido feels natural, powerful, and just "on". I see people around the various clubs where I train that seem to achieve this state regularly and with relative ease.

I recently read a book by Kancho Sunadomari where he quotes O Sensei saying "I can teach you this aikido in three months". Of course Sunadomari Sensei doesn't take this literally, but I think that O Sensei was saying that learning aikido is not a nearly impossible feat like turning invisible or astral travel or something.

I'm wondering if a negative state of mind or a condition of false humility might actually inhibit this power from coming through in movement. I'm not accusing anyone of anything -- just following an idea around.

If we strongly believe that actual realization of aikido in our own body/mind/spirit is only a distant, ephemeral possibility, do we not push it away from us in some small manner?
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2007, 10:12 AM   #19
charyuop
Dojo: Ponca Aikikai
Location: Ponca City, Oklahoma
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 131
United_States
Offline
Re: When do people start to "get it"?

I already "got it"...I got that I suck hee hee (and here a bunch of people thinking how humble...till the day they have a chance to see me on the mat LOL).

Anyway I agree with whoever says that there are layers of getting it and that comes out clear when you are a beginner. You straggle to understand what the mean "keep your arm in front of you" and when you finally realize what it means keeping with your center it goes to the next level. Now move with your center keeping the arm in fron of you. And from here on...
I asked once in another forum what is the difference between a 5th Dan and a 8th Dan, if promotions are political or technical. Most of the answers were that by that time everyone has developed his own Aikido and that nobody can actually judge it so it is most political. I could not believe that answer was correct, because I cannot accept that my Sensei is at the same level of his Sensei (Ikeda Sensei and Saotome Sensei). If it was so, why trying to improve, you reached "it".
I am sure not even O Sensei actually "got it", but was still on the way of discovering the next layer, which to my eyes can have no difference from his previous layer, but to his eyes must have been a huge difference.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2007, 10:38 AM   #20
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
Offline
Re: When do people start to "get it"?

Quote:
Conrad Gustafson wrote: View Post
Just an observation -- it seems like people are being awfully hard on themselves. Don't you have days when aikido feels natural, powerful, and just "on". I see people around the various clubs where I train that seem to achieve this state regularly and with relative ease.
Hi, well, I'm not being humble, just trying to be honest with myself. Aikido (most forms of it anyway) has no competition to keep us honest, so we have to try hard to foster that ourselves.

Sure, there are times, as I said, when things work; the flow is there, the structure is there, the mind is there...it all fits. For me, consistency is the issue. I'm not satified with one throw in a month where everything clicks. I'm not satisfied with 10. I'll only be satisfied when every throw is clicking...regardless of who I'm training with, the amount of resistance, the time of the month, etc.

Quote:
If we strongly believe that actual realization of aikido in our own body/mind/spirit is only a distant, ephemeral possibility, do we not push it away from us in some small manner?
It's quite possible that you are correct. But on the other hand, perhaps thinking that we have already arrived is just as bad a problem. I'm sure there is a middle way somewhere...I'll let you know when I find it...

Best,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2007, 10:41 AM   #21
mathewjgano
 
mathewjgano's Avatar
Dojo: Tsubaki Kannagara Jinja Aikidojo; Himeji Shodokan Dojo
Location: Renton
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 2,225
United_States
Offline
Re: When do people start to "get it"?

Quote:
Conrad Gustafson wrote: View Post
I'm wondering if a negative state of mind or a condition of false humility might actually inhibit this power from coming through in movement. I'm not accusing anyone of anything -- just following an idea around.

If we strongly believe that actual realization of aikido in our own body/mind/spirit is only a distant, ephemeral possibility, do we not push it away from us in some small manner?
When it comes to learning of any kind, I do think this is a huge element often overlooked. I was fairly young when I saw a difference in my own ability to learn based solely on my self image and attitude and its validity has only been reinforced over time. The phrase I've personally adopted to describe the "proper" attitude is humble audacity and to my mind it essentially describes a level of sincerity which recognizes both one's own shortcomings along with the genius we all have within us.
Not that this mental paradigm has given me any huge advantage in learning things over other people...it's just an idea after all. Internalizing and manifesting the attitude are quite different from coming up with a nicely packaged concept and most people do it automatically without the need of some convoluted concept, but as a self-teaching (ie-learning) device and reminder it's served me pretty well.

Last edited by mathewjgano : 11-21-2007 at 10:45 AM.

Gambarimashyo!
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2007, 10:49 AM   #22
Conrad Gus
 
Conrad Gus's Avatar
Dojo: Victoria Family Aikido
Location: Victoria, BC
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 268
Canada
Offline
Re: When do people start to "get it"?

Quote:
George S. Ledyard wrote: View Post
Rupert's right. There is no "when" you get "it". There's a virtually infinite range punctuated with plateaus where you make breakthroughs.

If you look around you can see that in almost any area you could name, there is someone who has taken his skills to a level that seems almost incomprehensible. No one ever masters it all, ever.

So get used to the feeling that you have no clue... become friends with that feeling. Being willing to accept that fact as you get more and more knowledge is what will allow you to keep developing until you pass out of this life.
OK, that makes a lot of sense too. It's exciting to think that there will always be fresh discoveries no longer how long you keep training. Personally, I really love the process and the experience of training and would be sad if it stopped at a certain point.

I also agree that if you think you've "got it" you might be inclined to rest on your laurels. I tell my beginners "In six months you won't feel completely awkward". By "get it", I was sort of pointing toward the next level of not feeling completely awkward.

A shihan once told me that shodan is like graduating from high school, sandan is like getting an undergrad degree at university, and rokudan is like having a PhD. You don't stop learning or discovering -- ever.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2007, 10:52 AM   #23
Conrad Gus
 
Conrad Gus's Avatar
Dojo: Victoria Family Aikido
Location: Victoria, BC
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 268
Canada
Offline
Re: When do people start to "get it"?

Quote:
Matthew Gano wrote: View Post
When it comes to learning of any kind, I do think this is a huge element often overlooked. I was fairly young when I saw a difference in my own ability to learn based solely on my self image and attitude and its validity has only been reinforced over time. The phrase I've personally adopted to describe the "proper" attitude is humble audacity and to my mind it essentially describes a level of sincerity which recognizes both one's own shortcomings along with the genius we all have within us.
Not that this mental paradigm has given me any huge advantage in learning things over other people...it's just an idea after all. Internalizing and manifesting the attitude are quite different from coming up with a nicely packaged concept and most people do it automatically without the need of some convoluted concept, but as a self-teaching (ie-learning) device and reminder it's served me pretty well.
Matthew,

I always had the impression that your teacher in particular would encourage us to keep a positive, hopeful mindset in training, but I haven't done enough classes with him to hear him say anything like that. Am I wrong?

Conrad
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2007, 02:27 PM   #24
mathewjgano
 
mathewjgano's Avatar
Dojo: Tsubaki Kannagara Jinja Aikidojo; Himeji Shodokan Dojo
Location: Renton
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 2,225
United_States
Offline
Re: When do people start to "get it"?

Quote:
Conrad Gustafson wrote: View Post
Matthew,

I always had the impression that your teacher in particular would encourage us to keep a positive, hopeful mindset in training, but I haven't done enough classes with him to hear him say anything like that. Am I wrong?

Conrad
Hi Conrad,
I was speaking purely for myself. You seem to be implying you disagree with some aspect of what I said...or that I may have come across differently than I intended...or I'm reading too much into it. I meant simply that in my experience, believing in yourself is perhaps the most important aspect of learning anything, be it Aikido or otherwise. I hope I didn't come across as pompous.
But, no, I've never heard Sensei Barrish say anything quite like what I posted. He tends to speak more simply...which i suppose leaves less room for interpretation...and yeah, it's generally to the effect of maintaining constant positivity. What are your thoughts regarding what I said?
Sincerely,
Matthew

Last edited by mathewjgano : 11-21-2007 at 02:31 PM.

Gambarimashyo!
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2007, 03:42 PM   #25
Conrad Gus
 
Conrad Gus's Avatar
Dojo: Victoria Family Aikido
Location: Victoria, BC
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 268
Canada
Offline
Re: When do people start to "get it"?

Quote:
Matthew Gano wrote: View Post
Hi Conrad,
I was speaking purely for myself. You seem to be implying you disagree with some aspect of what I said...or that I may have come across differently than I intended...or I'm reading too much into it. I meant simply that in my experience, believing in yourself is perhaps the most important aspect of learning anything, be it Aikido or otherwise. I hope I didn't come across as pompous.
But, no, I've never heard Sensei Barrish say anything quite like what I posted. He tends to speak more simply...which i suppose leaves less room for interpretation...and yeah, it's generally to the effect of maintaining constant positivity. What are your thoughts regarding what I said?
Sincerely,
Matthew
Matthew,

Sorry I wasn't clear. I actually agreed with what you said (as far as I understood it). I like "humble audacity".

My question about Barrish Sensei was kind of tangential to your post. He seems like he would be very encouraging.

Conrad
  Reply With Quote

Please visit our sponsor:

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!



Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Ogawa Ryu ? Ethan Weisgard Non-Aikido Martial Traditions 21 10-01-2007 06:36 AM
Atemi DavidM General 61 06-24-2002 10:04 AM
High-ranking Non-japanese Yudansha Kami General 86 11-09-2001 03:38 PM
Advertising Aikido Yozzer General 9 09-22-2000 02:04 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:20 AM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2018 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2018 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate