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Old 08-04-2009, 11:45 PM   #551
dps
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

Quote:
Rob Liberti wrote: View Post
Got it. And Posts:
http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showpo...&postcount=530
http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showpo...&postcount=533

...sum up my position about what IS missing.

So I've been saying go check out Dan and Mike, and it turns out that you are not even training regularly. I take it back, please do not go see Dan or Mike.

Rob
I understand Ron. I have stated repeatedly that I am not currently training in this thread and others. I have nothing to hide.

David
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Old 08-04-2009, 11:54 PM   #552
rob_liberti
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

Quote:
David Skaggs wrote: View Post
I understand Ron. I have stated repeatedly that I am not currently training in this thread and others. I have nothing to hide.
I just find it a bit odd that your position is not even a vote for complacency in a current training method, it is instead support for a whole new level of complacency to the point that what you learned 20 years ago was more than enough.

Look everyone has their own goals. I'm not attempting to judge you. You started this thread with an agenda. I just happen to disagree with that agenda, but I appreciate your setting up this soap box for me to stand on.

Rob
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Old 08-04-2009, 11:57 PM   #553
dps
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

Quote:
Rob Liberti wrote: View Post
I just find it a bit odd that your position is not even a vote for complacency in a current training method, it is instead support for a whole new level of complacency to the point that what you learned 20 years ago was more than enough.

Look everyone has their own goals. I'm not attempting to judge you. You started this thread with an agenda. I just happen to disagree with that agenda, but I appreciate your setting up this soap box for me to stand on.

Rob
It is a soap box for everyone to stand on within the confines of the thread topic. The thread has gone on for 532 posts. Do you think the discussion was worthwhile?

David

Last edited by dps : 08-05-2009 at 12:00 AM.
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Old 08-05-2009, 12:32 AM   #554
dps
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

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Michael Gelum wrote: View Post
Finally, the truth is told.

Mr. Skaggs does not train, and has misrepresented his experience and skill. I am able to say this due to his short stint at my dojo, approximately three months.

Mr. Skaggs stated that he trained under Charles Cycyk Sensei, at the long defunct Youngstown Aikikai. Cycyk Sensei was a unique individual, and passed away years ago. I was an acquaintance of his, not a student or close friend.
Without going any further, unless Mr. Skaggs pushes the envelope, I will leave it at that being enough said.

Mickey Gelum

Quote:
David Skaggs wrote: View Post
I was a student of Sensei Cycyk and a friend. I trained with Sensei CyCyk some twenty years ago.
I currently do not practice due to physical problems, mainly my knees, which I have posted on this thread and others.

As far as how long you were my Sensei, I have the attendance records of the Aikido Club at my church , a satellite of your dojo, that you were the sensei at to prove how long I was your student.

From the dojo listing of the JAA/USA website (Shodokan Aikido)
http://www.tomiki.org/members.html

Ohio
Churchill Aikido Club Sensei Michael Gelum 189 Churchill-Hubbard Rd
Liberty, OH
330-219-0146
SenseiArashi@WarrenBudokan.com
http://warrenbudokan.com M-W 6:00-8:00

This video was shot at my church's Aikido Club.
http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...+aikido+&hl=en

David
Mickey,

I started at your dojo in April 2006, the video was taped 01:08 - Mar 18, 2008.

Post#1
http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showth...047#post138047

04-18-2006, 01:12 AM

Quote:
David Skaggs wrote: View Post
Hello,
My name is David Skaggs from Youngstown, Ohio in the United States.
I started Aikido in 1984 at Youngstown State University under
Sensei Larry Hlywa and continued until 1990 under Sensei Chuck
Cycyk. Because of a work injury to my right knee I had to stop.
A couple weeks ago I started again under Sensei Michael Gelum of
Shizuka na Arashi Dojo in Warren, Ohio. It feels great to be practicing again even with my Rice Krispy knees ( they snap, crackle, and pop now) and not so flexible back.
The records from the church Aikido club shows that March of 2008 was the last month you were sensei at the church club.

David

Last edited by dps : 08-05-2009 at 12:46 AM.
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Old 08-05-2009, 02:09 AM   #555
dps
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

http://www.edgework.info/article_naturalmovement.html
Natural Movement and Its Relationship to Martial Arts©
Ellis Amdur M.A., N.C.C., C.M.H.S

Execerpt #1

"A "natural" life is a powerful life -- one is using one's body at all times, responding to challenges every day, because to fail is to die -- the human organism is required to act with everything he or she has. The power and endurance that so-called primitive people display can be amazing. The same is true with those who still labor to survive: carrying heavy loads, or building structures with little more than one's body and simple tools, or such repetitive acts as milking one hundred cows by hand, pulling up one hundred rows of carrots, or laying thousands of bricks in a single day. Anyone who has to do hard physical labor, particularly when bearing heavy loads, begins to develop the ability to channel outside forces through one's body into the ground, and conversely, using the ground to "brace" so that one can push and pull with all one's power, no iota dissipating tangential to this alignment."

Excerpt #2

"This ability is the product of systematic practice including long periods of standing -- immobile -- rebooting the organization of the body, so to speak, by standing in the same kind of active relaxation that the Inuit hunter must have maintained while poised with spear in ready position over a breathing hole in the ice.

Why is standing still so valuable? If you move, you take the stress off the nervous system and the body, and simply continue to compensate in a way that you are used to. But if you practice "not-moving" long enough, the brain gets the information that it is going to have to deal with the fact that this body will stay in this position, like it or not. The result is that the brain begins to reorganize to make the posture less stressful, and hence begins to enervate the muscles differently to aid in maximum efficiency. Almost all so-called internal arts either practice include standing practice, or use simple repetitive movements, through which one achieves similar results, in essence achieving "immobility within motion."

From http://www.edgework.info/article_naturalmovement.html

Natural Movement and Its Relationship to Martial Arts©

Ellis Amdur M.A., N.C.C., C.M.H.S

David
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Old 08-05-2009, 02:11 AM   #556
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

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Erick Mead wrote: View Post
(And Ark is to be commended for his public approach to matters, so this is in no way critical). Things like this or this or this -- are not in any way surprising to me, nor anything out of my own experience and performance. It is not that I quibble with methods if they work, proof is in the pudding, I suppose. It is just that the results are not materially different.
In these videos, especially the katate and ryote dori techniques, nage visibly disconnects from uke with the initial ‘reception' and immediately creates two discordant rhythms. By rushing(clipping) the acceleration nage is violating the implicit demand and explicit frequency of uke. Training oneself to separate from uke prior to throw completion is poor budo and definitely not Aiki. Nage can easily compensate such errors quite well on a practical level but ‘success' through chaotic dominance will always be relative to uke's skill level. Only truly harmonic action has access to infinite power.
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Old 08-05-2009, 04:58 AM   #557
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

Quote:
David Skaggs wrote: View Post
Ellis Amdur quote:
"But if you practice "not-moving" long enough, the brain gets the information that it is going to have to deal with the fact that this body will stay in this position, like it or not. The result is that the brain begins to reorganize to make the posture less stressful, and hence begins to enervate the muscles differently to aid in maximum efficiency. Almost all so-called internal arts either practice include standing practice, or use simple repetitive movements, through which one achieves similar results, in essence achieving "immobility within motion."
And yet I know of no internal art that claims that just standing there or doing simple movements is all you have to do to develop 'it'.
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Old 08-05-2009, 08:23 AM   #558
Ron Tisdale
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

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Shaun Ravens wrote: View Post
...you can come back as Bruce Baker in your next life...
Oh No! He who must not be named!!!!

Just kidding, hope he is well in what ever he is doing...
Best,
Ron (just couldn't resist)

Ron Tisdale
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"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
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Old 08-05-2009, 08:26 AM   #559
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

Yes, I hope Bruce is doing well and has resolved some of his anger.

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Old 08-05-2009, 08:54 AM   #560
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

Quote:
Bruce Baker wrote: View Post
How long will it be before someone else comes along with a synthesis of martial arts, doing what O'Sensei did, only better? It is inevitable
hmmm.... funny!
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Old 08-05-2009, 08:59 AM   #561
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

We need to make room for all opinions and theories-even from those who have no skills (that are worthy of note) outside their own walls. It is clear they have never felt or encountered the level of aiki we are talking about in the hands of men capable of using it, so their comparisons and opinions stand on their own merit. I just hope that fact doesn't go unnoticed or keep people in a state of complacency.

This material once pursued will change your budo forever. It was always the bastion of the few who undertook it, and most would not openly share it. It is unprecedented to see men-for the first time- teaching these things openly and across party lines.

Hidden in plain site?
Daito ryu teacher who went to Tokimune for aiki (he was given a set of solo training and paired exercises to bring back to his school) "Sensei, no one wants to do them. They just want to do techniques!" Tokimune said "No one wants to do them here either- they want more and more techniques."
Juxtapose that to Sagawa who openly stated he refused to teach it until the end of his life, further that Takeda told him not to teach it to westerners. And then noted that when he started teaching his own men they dramatically improved!
Thats just one art-there are many examples in others. What about the ki society work that was bashed during the "ki wars" here? Oddly enough the person best able to grasp at least "some" of the training at a recent event was from the ki society!

This training is defining. Those undertaking it in earnest will simply be the better martial artists. For those who are trying to compare the "IT" of those being discussed to yourselves and are thinking you can invite certain people to your dojo to share what you do with them on an equal footing in abilities? I would suggest you revisit that and consider the comparisons might best be left to the most capable Shihan you can find. When it comes to "IT" it tends to speak for itself. you might just find you won't have anything to "share" that compares.
While there will always be men who stand out against the budo wallpaper, I'm always shocked to see how so many are willing to be the wallpaper when the path to the single greatest power in the arts is staring them in the face. In the fullness of time-these same people will be scrambling to learn from the Aikido folks choosing to undertake this training now. Why? They will simply be outclassed from within the art of Aikido by their fellow Aikidoists who are pursuing "IT." Well, that's already happening isn't it? You already have shihan and 6th dans training outside the art to get "IT." And they, like me, are unconcerned with those who cannot yet see the essence of their own art that has gone untrained.
Cheers
Dan

Last edited by DH : 08-05-2009 at 09:14 AM.
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Old 08-05-2009, 09:19 AM   #562
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

Just to toss out a caution from experience.

There were a number of Chinese who came to the U.S. (and other countries) who had studied White Crane, Hung Gar, and many other arts that all had their own brand and approach to ki/kokyu/qi/jin skills. In order to make a living, many of these people included "Tai Chi" in their curriculum, since it's a known money-maker, and they essentially taught their "Tai Chi" while demonstrating the physical skills from other arts. But who's to know that, among westerners?

So what you wound up with is a lot of "Tai Chi" that was actually White Crane powered, Long Fist powered, and so on. I know of several big "names" in England who dominate the scene because they use some pretty hardcore posture and breathing training to get people powerful and then enter these people into the mad-scrabble bs they call "Tai Chi Tournaments". These strong people dominate, using the mainly southern shaolin neigong training that they do, so "Tai Chi" in England is often nothing like what Tai Chi actually is... or was intended to be. It's become something else. A parody.

The point is that some concern has to be had about people inserting various other arts/origins into Aikido in ways that fundamentally change Aikido while the effort is being made to put "IT" back into Aikido. I've made that same point for a number of years now... sorry... but I think it's an important consideration. Put back what's "missing", sure. "Change" Aikido, no (hmmmm.... would that be Obamaikido?).

FWIW

Mike Sigman
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Old 08-05-2009, 09:20 AM   #563
dps
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/newrep...wreply&p=16854

02-27-2002, 01:01 PM

Post #1

Quote:
Bruce Baker wrote: View Post
I see a lot of posturing about the different types of AIKIDO and the different effectiveness of styles? You all miss the point. Aikido in the synthesis of many arts by O'Sensei. His contribution included the study of many arts, and the final results, for us, was Aikido. Have any of you looked into Pressure Points? Use of Chi/Ki with the positive and negative effects found in Aikido? Or even the use of sounds to draw upon the power of the universe itself? NO? Then you have studied the western way. Once you understand these things, then you will begin to see the secrets O'Sensei left to us in this art! If you want to yell like children immitating what they have seen without understanding why, have fun. If you want to learn, you must study pressure points, Chi/Ki, and the sounds of elements to start on the road O'Sensei began for us?
Connective tissue (http://www.acupuncturetoday.com/mpac....php?id=28247),
aiki
and Kotodama.

Was he wrong?

David
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Old 08-05-2009, 09:37 AM   #564
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote: View Post
...But who's to know that, among westerners?
...It's become something else. A parody.

The point is that some concern has to be had about people inserting various other arts/origins into Aikido in ways that fundamentally change Aikido while the effort is being made to put "IT" back into Aikido. I've made that same point for a number of years now... sorry... but I think it's an important consideration. Put back what's "missing", sure. "Change" Aikido, no (hmmmm.... would that be Obamaikido?).
FWIW
Mike Sigman
While good points in and of themselves- another caution needs to be interjected.
There is a history of aikido teachers-including shihan- training in taiji, koryu and other arts that have internal aspects and bringing that training into their aikido. Then you have the classic-Tohei- who went outside the art as well to bring in skills that saw him recognized and promoted to 10th dan, and then Shioda who went to DR etc etc. So, I think the final arbiter of what is good for aikido might best be left to those in it- to judge for themselves- once they train with various sources.

I would hate to presume or make it sound like Aikido teachers are stupid or ignorant, and have no ability to discern what is good for their art. I have found them -thus far- to be pretty good judges of what might fit or not, and where things can be incorporated without changing their art. Aikido is fluid enough to allow for personal expression. Something which remains one of the strengths of the art.
Cheers
Dan

Last edited by DH : 08-05-2009 at 09:49 AM.
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Old 08-05-2009, 09:39 AM   #565
rob_liberti
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

David,

No, he was not so terribly wrong in THOSE ideas - which is why it is so funny.

Personally, I'm not a big believer in the value of "pressure points". Something interesting to know for sure.

I do have a fairly decent working understanding of kotodama. My influence generally comes from a synthesis of the kojiki and the Takeuchi scrolls. Somehow, I don't think Bruce was hep to that, but I could be wrong...

What's your point? I'm all about O-sensei's aikido. I even plan to some day get together with Shaun Ravens and beg him to show me any of the misogi drills he is willing to share.

If O-sensei were alive today and came to my dojo, I wouldn't be terribly concerned that what I was doing would be considered so much of a "change" of aikido, but I'd certainly welcome his insight.

Rob

Last edited by rob_liberti : 08-05-2009 at 09:45 AM.

old mcdojo had a form, aiki aiki do...
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Old 08-05-2009, 09:41 AM   #566
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

David, totally don't get the point you are making? Can you state a clear sentence or two about what it is that you are trying to say.

Got it, accupunction, meridians, pressure points,chi, kotodama....

But what is the connection (no pun intended) or conclusion that you are making. It is not clear to me. Sorry.

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Old 08-05-2009, 11:12 AM   #567
dps
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

Quote:
Kevin Leavitt wrote: View Post
David, totally don't get the point you are making? Can you state a clear sentence or two about what it is that you are trying to say.

Got it, accupunction, meridians, pressure points,chi, kotodama....

But what is the connection (no pun intended) or conclusion that you are making. It is not clear to me. Sorry.
It is in response to these posts.

Quote:
Shaun Ravens wrote: View Post
OK, then... if we start off with where you are now, it is just as evident that if you work hard enough you can come back as Bruce Baker in your next life
Quote:
Ron Tisdale wrote: View Post
Oh No! He who must not be named!!!!

Just kidding, hope he is well in what ever he is doing...
Best,
Ron (just couldn't resist)
Quote:
Kevin Leavitt wrote: View Post
Yes, I hope Bruce is doing well and has resolved some of his anger.
Quote:
Rob Liberti wrote: View Post
Bruce Baker wrote:
How long will it be before someone else comes along with a synthesis of martial arts, doing what O'Sensei did, only better? It is inevitable.
Quote:
Rob Liberti wrote: View Post
hmmm.... funny!
These are things that are being discussed in current threads on AikiWeb.
I was wondering why they thought he was wrong about what he stated.

David
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Old 08-05-2009, 12:11 PM   #568
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

Quote:
Tenyu Hamaki wrote: View Post
In these videos, especially the katate and ryote dori techniques, nage visibly disconnects from uke with the initial ‘reception' and immediately creates two discordant rhythms. By rushing(clipping) the acceleration nage is violating the implicit demand and explicit frequency of uke. ... ‘success' through chaotic dominance will always be relative to uke's skill level. Only truly harmonic action has access to infinite power.
"What's the Frequency, Kenneth?" Success is always proportional to skill even in this framework. I agree there is a driven frequency. I agree there is a chaotic collapse. I do not necessarily agree that the two rhythms are discordant. They are in fact harmonic.

While it is true that a discordant chaotic pulse (also known, technically speaking, as "hammering the crap out of somebody") can create a resulting chaotic movement, it also just naturally results from a driven harmonic at a fundamental frequency, which erupts into a resonant chaos.

The result suggests the latter -- and the reflexive head bob is, in my view, conclusive, and the reflexive triggering of the leg extensors ( ryote) and flexors (katate) in succession is quite apparent. The grossly noticeable buckling/shimmy thing going on is a sure sign. Just arbitrarily snatching on or beating into someone's structure does not do that. Of course, if you know what is happening and can do it, you can damp it by a similar means, which involves no leverage.

Ark is popping the guy's gamma motor spindles and Golgi tendon organs. Think of them like structural circuit breakers. Driven resonance goes asymptotic and becomes destructive very quickly. The body does not have the margin to wait for conscious feedback in that case. Either it reflexively acts or it risks a stability loss (or structural damage) that is not recoverable.

Simple harmonic action is linear. Complex harmonic action is non-linear and resonant. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_pendulum
My arm is a double pendulum. The upper and lower centers form a double inverted pendulum Two people (simplified) can be considered double inverted pendulums. A multiple n-pendulum as n becomes > ~ 3 is a chain.

Driven resonance (90 degrees out of phase -- temporally, spatially or BOTH ) at a whole number frequency within the pahse space leads to chaotic movement. Resonance (at the fundamental frequency of a structure) will find any discontinuity in a the shear path in that system and collapse it at that point. Furitama is that fundamental frequency. Funetori undo, ude furi, sayu undo, happo undo, all define the limits of a moving phase space for a periodic dynamic stability region (the length of one simple natural pendulum swing) all of which can be made harmonic spatially (i.e -- 90 degree or Juuji 十字] relationship) with connected another phase space when they interact -- as the the two pendulums do when linked.

On the third one, that you did not mention, Mr. Chen. In the animation above, if the two pendulum are seen as crude representations of the two bodies connected, the periods where the system undergoes the single or doubled "whoop-de-do" rotations of the lower pendulum -- correspond to the throwing opportunities in the complex phase space, as used by Mr. Chen. The other periodic back and forth in-phase, leading phase or lagging phase oscillations where there is no full rotation are the "wait for it" part. Where it is commencing a full rotation -- that suddenly becomes "downhill" in the phase space for a throw -- and a throw if you go with it. Surf the break, man. If you attempt a throw anywhere else in that phase space -- you are working seriously uphill, and are likely to get caught inside.

The boundary of the above 2D pendulums figure may viewed as a the projection of a limacon, (the pedal of a circle) rotated around the axis of its cusp. Roughly, imagine seeing the profile of a squat apple shape constructed of loops of yarn with a deep cusp at the stem and a hollow teardrop core -- See below), or like a doughnut contracted to the point that the inner ring overlaps itself to make the center hole an internal lozenge or teardrop volume.

If you consider and look for the related bounding figures (cycloids and trochoids) of this kind of action. you have some better concrete imagery to prime your intuition about the spatial boundaries of the dynamics you are trying to achieve (regardless of scale -- the cusp can be arbitrarily large or miniscule) --- and the pedal curve (below) shows the explicit presence of juuji in the relationship.

Limacon

Another family of boundary curves of useful interest where cusp discontinuity and shear are immediately evident and yet have a seamless transition are the hyperboloids, catenoids and helicoids:

Last edited by Erick Mead : 08-05-2009 at 12:22 PM.

Cordially,

Erick Mead
一隻狗可久里馬房但他也不是馬的.
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Old 08-05-2009, 12:16 PM   #569
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

unbelievable
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Old 08-05-2009, 12:17 PM   #570
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

It's not so much that he was wrong in what he stated in a general sense...it was more that the way he stated things and the extremes to which he took them were not so well recieved.

He was an interesting fellow...last I knew him. Just didn't appear all that qualified to be lecturing people on what made up aikido. And inspite of being a very large fellow...he displayed none of the power of Dan, Mike, Akuzawa, etc.

Best,
Ron (so we got a little off-topic...we can just as easily get back on)

Ron Tisdale
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Old 08-05-2009, 12:18 PM   #571
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

Quote:
Rob Liberti wrote: View Post
Personally, I'm not a big believer in the value of "pressure points". Something interesting to know for sure.
These are also triggering muscle spindles and golgi tendon organs, among possibly several other things at other traditional locations. So it is plainly related, although the mechanism is more direct in approach.

Cordially,

Erick Mead
一隻狗可久里馬房但他也不是馬的.
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Old 08-05-2009, 12:23 PM   #572
Ron Tisdale
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

Preasure points have their uses...but when you consider trying to hit a specific place on different bodies where it is not always obvious where that person's point is while you are understress and the person is hitting back...

The utility ratio drops rather quickly. If you follow the general form of Daito ryu or Aikido forms, it's likely that you'd be able to activate one or more of them...they are an interesting clue to correct placement of your limbs in relation to an opponant.

I'd hesitate to consider them much more than that. Any trained fighter is more likely to ignore them than anything else, and it might just piss them off. Aside from certain well known knock out points (base of skull, arteries in the neck, points along the jaw, etc.).

Best,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
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"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
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Old 08-05-2009, 12:28 PM   #573
rob_liberti
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

David, I do not believe that the part I quoted had anything to do with the "anger" issues that Kevin mentioned. I took Shaun's comment to mean that he was drawing a comparison in terms of inappropriateness - but that's just my take on it. I just brought that particular quote up for the humor of it all. Apparently, he should be remembered just as much for being a visionary as his congeniality.

Erick, I didn't mean to suggest that I didn't understand pressure points (to some degree anyway). They are just kind of a low percentage thing to go for until things are already over.

Rob

old mcdojo had a form, aiki aiki do...
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Old 08-05-2009, 01:03 PM   #574
dps
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

Will the Hanmi in Aikido achieve the same thing as pole standing in the Chinese Internal Martial Arts?

From http://www.traditional-aikido.com/Te...eal_stance.htm

The Ideal Hanmi in Aikido
"The mechanics of the stance are as follows: Point your front foot straight ahead. Turn your rear foot until it is approximately perpendicular to the front foot. Align the ball of your front foot with the ball of your rear foot; this creates the triangular stance. Bend your knees. Your front knee should be in a straight vertical line with the toes of the front foot—in other words, do not bend your knee so far that it hangs past your toes. Your weight is evenly placed between both feet, as though your weight is going down from your center, between your feet, and into the ground.

Like so:

Stance.gif (897 bytes)

O'Sensei called this stance ushiro-sankaku (rear triangle). Your weight sits in this triangle, relaxed, centered. Drop your hips. Imagine a line going from the top of your head, down through your hara (center), hips, between your feet, and into the ground to the center of the earth. If you can achieve this mental state, your body will be immovable."
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Old 08-05-2009, 01:10 PM   #575
jss
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Re: Is It Missing In Everybody's Aikido?

Quote:
David Skaggs wrote: View Post
Will the Hanmi in Aikido achieve the same thing as pole standing in the Chinese Internal Martial Arts?
Depends if you're doing the work during the standing or not. But I think you can use the hanmi stance, it's similar enough to what this Yiquan guy is using:

Quote:
Drop your hips. Imagine a line going from the top of your head, down through your hara (center), hips, between your feet, and into the ground to the center of the earth. If you can achieve this mental state, your body will be immovable."
Now that's interesting. Being immovable while maintaining just one of the three pairs of opposing forces...
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