Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > Open Discussions

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 11-07-2011, 10:41 PM   #26
mathewjgano
 
mathewjgano's Avatar
Dojo: Tsubaki Kannagara Jinja Aikidojo; Himeji Shodokan Dojo
Location: Renton
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 2,225
United_States
Offline
Re: Education Crises

Quote:
Phi Truong wrote: View Post
pitfalls of montessori are few, if any. currently, it runs as private schools, which costs more. doesn't have to be if public school system model after it. personally, i don't have problem scraping the whole public school system and replace it with montessori model school system.

picture this, a classroom where the teacher desks aren't in front of the classroom, but mingle with the student desks. there is no "front of the class" or "rear of the class". each section of the room is a learning station: geography, math, science, english, and so on. each classroom has some pet cages with pets where the student care for them. students are freely move about the room depends on his/her own schedule which the student work it out the teacher for the whole week. there are no lecture, only group discussion on topics. homework is rare. there are 3 grades in the same classroom, normally. the higher grade students mentoring the lower grade; it's a sempai-kohai relationship. each student spent 3 years in the same classroom. field trips outside of the classroom are the norm. if you want to learn biology, a good place would be the wood or stream bed or swamp, and so the field trips. if you want to learn history, lets go to some of the historical places. learn by touch, by feel, by all the senses, then lastly through group discussion, i.e. analysis. parents participation are very much encourage. parents and teachers meet on a regular basis. information flow from teachers to student and parents uninterupted and bidirectional.
Hi Phi,
Thank you for describing that!
Well to be fair I don't have any direct exposure to it. I am drawn to the idea of a more free-flowing learning process where the students get to study in ways that suit them direcly. I have heard from a few different teachers (some who regularly use stations similar to what you're describing) and parents that Montessori students can have a harder time in situations where they're not doing what they would rather be doing...such as in a more traditional class, go figure. I really like the different ages working together. I think it creates a real sense of responsibility in the older kids while reinforcing their own learning, among other benefits such as can be found in the sempai-kohai system. I always remember there being a huge gap between grade-levels. Different aged kids interacted, but were still segregated to some extent because we only hung out at recess. Kids have the benefit of greater relatability amongst themselves whereas adults often can be out of touch in subtle ways (someone from "inside the circle" asking you to learn something has more gravitas than someone from the "outside").
Actually, most of what you described is present in many classrooms now though. My wife uses stations and group discussion every day; peer tutoring within and throughout grade levels; lecture is minimal and based on outlining the project/lesson of the moment and is followed up throughout with mini-lessons as needed; she walks around the classroom to give praise and help where asked for; parents regularly are in the classroom in a variety of capacities (tutoring, story time, busy-work, etc.); and field trips are more common than in many other more traditional classrooms.
In my courses we were pushed to embrace a constructivist model where teachers serve as "facilitators" in a learning environment designed around the kids; to engage their interests as much as possible becaus it is only through an interest that they will retain much of anything, let alone go out on their own to try and learn new things. The model is and has been shifting...in places, at least. I think scrapping the whole system probably isn't the best option in every area and at the least would need some serious transition periods...if for no other reason than the logistics involved in a massive paradigm shift. And I think some people probably are better suited to the more traditional mode. I think we have to account for that possibility as much as possible.
Parent involvement is something not every community is able to do so easily. My wife has had classrooms where parents simply are not available: they worked all day;maybe an older brother or cousin would come in every few months or so. When she has more upwardly mobile families in her classroom, it makes a huge difference from time put in to funds for resources...to attitudes about learning, unfortunately. I'm speaking very generally here, but that's the way the "data" seems to trend in my experiences (vicarious though they essentially are).

Last edited by mathewjgano : 11-07-2011 at 10:50 PM.

Gambarimashyo!
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2011, 06:29 AM   #27
phitruong
Dojo: Charlotte Aikikai Agatsu Dojo
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 1,938
United_States
Offline
Re: Education Crises

Quote:
Joe McParland wrote: View Post
I'd hypothesize that Montessori works partly because it's an expensive alternative. That is, there are parents behind the students who care sufficiently about the education to overcome those barriers and there's an expectation that the teachers will do a good job. (Again, just a theory. We homeschool, so we see similar things.)
it's expensive because the teaching materials, yearly teacher certification/training, lower student/teacher ratio, and higher teacher salary. expensive is a relative term. if you compare what we spent on war and prison (your tax dollars at work), then education expenses are pretty cheap, dirt cheap.

Quote:
If everything was Montessori, that might be a close equivalent to no education system at all, wherein the kids are all free to pursue what interests them from what's available around them. Homeschoolers call it "unschooling" or the like. Figure that's the root of every education system anyway
for some reason, folks seem to think that montessori education lets students do as they please and learn whatever. that isn't the case. each student, at the beginning of the week layout the amount of works for that week: math, science, english, foreign language, arts, and so on. each student chooses how he/she wants to do the work. some students would spent a whole day doing math, for example, then the next day, english. other students prefer an hour on science, two hours on english, and so on. the amount of work for all the students is the same, as long as he/she completes all the works by the end of the week, in school (very little homework). students discuss in groups all the time and in front of everyone, so public speaking and presentation isn't an obstacle, more as a norm. they are encouraged to explore and aren't afraid to do so which give them confidence and the love to learn.

"budo is putting on cold, wet, sweat stained gi with a smile and a snarl" - your truly
http://charlotteaikikai.org
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2011, 06:43 AM   #28
phitruong
Dojo: Charlotte Aikikai Agatsu Dojo
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 1,938
United_States
Offline
Re: Education Crises

Quote:
Matthew Gano wrote: View Post
Well to be fair I don't have any direct exposure to it. I am drawn to the idea of a more free-flowing learning process where the students get to study in ways that suit them direcly. I have heard from a few different teachers (some who regularly use stations similar to what you're describing) and parents that Montessori students can have a harder time in situations where they're not doing what they would rather be doing...such as in a more traditional class, go figure.
i put one kid through montessori then on to public high school, and now first year in college. i have another in the last year of montessori, then to public high school. it's not so much as the students having the problem, it's the parents (with a public education background and mindset). reminded me when i watched the show "the dog whisperer". rehabilitating the dog is often start with the owner(s). my wife kept bugging me why i watch the show when we don't even have a dog. to which i replied "the last dog we had with the side of salad last week, didn't taste like chicken at all!"

three things i learned from that show which also applies to children: exercise, discipline, then affection, in that order. most parents tend to do that orders in reverse which doesn't work very well.

"budo is putting on cold, wet, sweat stained gi with a smile and a snarl" - your truly
http://charlotteaikikai.org
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2011, 08:53 AM   #29
genin
Location: southwest
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 103
United_States
Offline
Re: Education Crises

Quote:
Phi Truong wrote: View Post
...three things i learned from (The Dog Whisperer) which also applies to children: exercise, discipline, then affection, in that order. most parents tend to do that orders in reverse which doesn't work very well.
As much as I hate to say it, I have always felt that raising/teaching children is akin to training dogs.

I know a woman who loves her dogs, but they are the worst trained animals I've ever seen. She has unwittingly trained them to be as annoying as possible. The reason is because she doesn't have an authoritative bone in her body, and the dogs walk all over her. What's sad is that she had a bunch of kids too, and one is now dead from drugs, the other is in prison for drugs, and another had alcohol related legal troubles early in life.

If you can't even make a little dog fear and respect you, then how can you ever expect a child to respect you and listen to you? I'll tell you one thing, love/affection doesn't always cut it, especially without discipline to go alone with it.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2011, 12:44 PM   #30
Janet Rosen
  AikiWeb Forums Contributing Member
 
Janet Rosen's Avatar
Location: Left Coast
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 4,339
Offline
Re: Education Crises

I realized the connection as a child watching friends and relatives with pet dogs and children....and by the age of 11 had decided that if I were in charge, anybody who wanted to have kids would be given a puppy. We would come back a year later and see how the dog was and on that basis they could or could not have children.
I've seen little in the intervening 45 years to change my mind.

Janet Rosen
http://www.zanshinart.com
"peace will enter when hate is gone"--percy mayfield
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2011, 01:22 PM   #31
hughrbeyer
Dojo: Shobu Aikido of Boston
Location: Peterborough, NH
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 653
United_States
Offline
Re: Education Crises

Having raised four kids and countless dogs, yeah, there's a lot of similarities, mostly having to do with love, freedom, and discipline: raising either dogs or kids without discipline doesn't give them freedom and is a lousy way to show love.

The difference is, you raise kids to become functioning, independent adults. You raise dogs to become members of your household. This comes up, for example, in dominance behavior--your dog has to believe you are the dominant member of the household. If you aren't, they think they have to be--which means they have to assess every potential threat and deal with it if they decide it's a danger. Whereas if they trust you to be the dominant, they'll trust you to assess and handle a threat.

Not a good parallel with kids, there.
  Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2011, 03:13 PM   #32
mathewjgano
 
mathewjgano's Avatar
Dojo: Tsubaki Kannagara Jinja Aikidojo; Himeji Shodokan Dojo
Location: Renton
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 2,225
United_States
Offline
Re: Education Crises

Quote:
Phi Truong wrote: View Post
i put one kid through montessori then on to public high school, and now first year in college. i have another in the last year of montessori, then to public high school. it's not so much as the students having the problem, it's the parents (with a public education background and mindset). reminded me when i watched the show "the dog whisperer". rehabilitating the dog is often start with the owner(s). my wife kept bugging me why i watch the show when we don't even have a dog. to which i replied "the last dog we had with the side of salad last week, didn't taste like chicken at all!"

three things i learned from that show which also applies to children: exercise, discipline, then affection, in that order. most parents tend to do that orders in reverse which doesn't work very well.
I think the major factor for what can make or break a system of teaching is in the home life of the children. If they have discipline reinforced at home, it usually carries over to other areas. I've heard of a student who one time told his parent, "I need more boundaries," after his teacher had been working with him on controlling his behavior a bit more in class. It was a bit of an eye opener for the parent I imagine.
I guess the question then becomes: what systems might suit students without just such a home life?
...and even then I guess it probably has more to do with the accuities of the teacher than the systems in place.

Gambarimashyo!
  Reply With Quote

Please visit our sponsor:

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!



Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Transmission, Inheritance, Emulation 20 Peter Goldsbury Columns 22 10-20-2011 10:28 PM
Mindful Modeling and Mentoring SeiserL Columns 182 12-04-2010 10:04 PM
Transmission, Inheritance, Emulation 17 Peter Goldsbury Columns 41 06-03-2010 09:46 PM
What was O'Sensei's Education Buck General 10 11-17-2009 07:49 AM
Aikido as therapy? Paula Lydon General 11 09-12-2002 06:07 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:02 AM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2018 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2018 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate