Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > Training

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 12-08-2004, 01:13 PM   #1
Dan Gould
Dojo: Cilfynydd, Pontypridd
Location: Abercynon, Wales
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 49
United Kingdom
Offline
Circle Training frequency

I've noticed that a lot of Americans I've seen and spoken to more often than not have sometimes three to five training sessions per week. I only have two aikido sessions a week and one aikijutsu, so I was wondering, should I be requesting more classes, or something?

I mean.. I dunno what I mean (three posts in a row I lose the plot after the first paragraph, DAMN IT! :-p) I just feel like I'm losing out, is it worth asking sensei about this?

Also, how do you feel about doing so many classes? Would it make the body very stiff to do it every day, or as frequently as that? Just thought it might be worth asking, it's been on my mind for a couple of days, now.

Thanks, as always.

Dan
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2004, 01:55 PM   #2
paw
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 768
Offline
Re: Training frequency

Quote:
Dan Gould wrote:
Also, how do you feel about doing so many classes?
Sounds like the question is, how do YOU feel. Generally, more training time = better at the skill


Quote:
Dan Gould wrote:
Would it make the body very stiff to do it every day, or as frequently as that?
It depends on the person. In general, people adapt to the situation, so as long as training was done "properly" there's no reason I can think of why anyone couldn't work up to training every day.

Regards,

Paul
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2004, 03:14 PM   #3
MaryKaye
Dojo: Seattle Ki Society
Location: Seattle
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 522
Offline
Re: Training frequency

You have to judge your own resources--both your physical and emotional limits of training, and the other demands of your life.

When I wanted to train more than 2 nights a week, my sempai told me that I had to work up to it carefully because it's dangerous to take ukemi when you're tired. I promptly did three classes in a row, and the third night I put my hand down on the mat for a forward roll and put my head down on top of it. Ow. So I figure sempai had a point. I train 4-5 days a week now, but I got there somewhat cautiously and I try to keep tabs on my fatigue level.

Listen to your body. The danger sign for me is weariness or stiffness that seems to get worse from night to night. If I feel like that, I need a break.

I'm not at all good at aikido--was a couch potato for too many years--and I find that 3 nights a week is probably the minimum if I'm actually going to improve. But some of my classmates can learn nicely on 2 nights a week, so that's not a general rule.

Mary Kaye
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2004, 05:55 PM   #4
SeiserL
 
SeiserL's Avatar
Location: Florida Gulf coast
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 3,882
United_States
Offline
Re: Training frequency

IMHO, we each need to find a training frequency that works for us, our jobs, and our families. Its not how often you train, but the intent and intensity when you do. Don't train more, train wiser.

Lynn Seiser PhD
Yondan Aikido & FMA/JKD
We do not rise to the level of our expectations, but fall to the level of our training. Train well. KWATZ!
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2004, 10:10 PM   #5
Bronson
 
Bronson's Avatar
Dojo: Seiwa Dojo and Southside Dojo
Location: Battle Creek & Kalamazoo, MI
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 1,677
Offline
Re: Training frequency

Gotta agree with Lynn. I was training 4-7 days a week for a while and my body and mind couldn't keep up. I retained very little during that time. I knocked it down to two/week as student and two/week teaching which seems to be a nice balance for me.

Bronson

p.s. Oh, yeah and one/week iaido.

"A pacifist is not really a pacifist if he is unable to make a choice between violence and non-violence. A true pacifist is able to kill or maim in the blink of an eye, but at the moment of impending destruction of the enemy he chooses non-violence."
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2004, 12:32 AM   #6
maikerus
Dojo: Roppongi Yoshinkan Aikido / Roppongi, Tokyo, Japan
Location: Tokyo
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 571
Japan
Offline
Re: Training frequency

I think Lynn's got it in one. Train wiser. You can get alot out of every class (no matter how few) if you really put your mind to it.

It is all about balance and being able to do it when you want to and when the other things in your life can't really hold it against you - as in it doesn't infringe on their time with you. That's why I get up at 4AM 3 times a week to go train...my better half is asleep and doesn't notice <g>

I have trouble explaining the Saturday night class though. <sigh>

--Michael

Hiriki no yosei 3 - The kihon that makes your head ache instead of your legs
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2004, 02:18 AM   #7
JJF
 
JJF's Avatar
Dojo: Vestfyn Aikikai Denmark
Location: Vissenbjerg
Join Date: Jul 2000
Posts: 794
Denmark
Offline
Re: Training frequency

Spot on Lynn.

My life demands a lot of me since I have two kids, a full-time job, a wife with a career and play in a band as well. I want - nay I NEED aikido in my life - so I adapt. I go at least once a week (my wife insists - if I don't go I become grumpy). Preferably i go twice a week and if there is little to do at my job perhaps even three times a week. The last two-three months before a grading I kick it up a gear in order to work out my program and at least three times a year I go to a seminar varying from two to six days. On theses seminars I dive into aikido and live and breathe it for then length of the seminar. Sweeeeet....

However the most important thing is that I do my best to be present in both mind and body when I'm there. I have seen plenty of people practicing twice a week for years and years and not getting anywhere. Heck - the first couple of years I had my mind elsewhere and didn't really learn that much. After I started a family my priorities have changed thus changing my take on my life.

Theses days I progress. In somer periods a lot - in some less. But I'm there, I'm enjoying it, and I don't sacrifice all the other important things in my life. To each his own. This it what works for me.

Now go practice and have some fun!

- Jørgen Jakob Friis

Inspiration - Aspiration - Perspiration
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2004, 07:12 AM   #8
grondahl
Dojo: Stockholms Aikidoklubb
Location: Stockholm
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 601
Sweden
Offline
Re: Training frequency

Quote:
Dan Gould wrote:
I've noticed that a lot of Americans I've seen and spoken to more often than not have sometimes three to five training sessions per week. I only have two aikido sessions a week and one aikijutsu, so I was wondering, should I be requesting more classes, or something?

I mean.. I dunno what I mean (three posts in a row I lose the plot after the first paragraph, DAMN IT! :-p) I just feel like I'm losing out, is it worth asking sensei about this?

Also, how do you feel about doing so many classes? Would it make the body very stiff to do it every day, or as frequently as that? Just thought it might be worth asking, it's been on my mind for a couple of days, now.

Thanks, as always.

Dan
I guess that the answer to your questions depends on what you want out of your training?
(1)Technical excellence in aikido? (2)Be able to "fight" whoever stands in your way? (3)Get a good exercise? (4)Use it as a form of moving meditation to clear your mind&body from day to day stress?

Different reasons needs different answers...
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2004, 09:52 AM   #9
philipsmith
Dojo: Ren Shin Kan
Location: Birmingham
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 356
United Kingdom
Offline
Re: Training frequency

Quote:
Lynn Seiser wrote:
IMHO, we each need to find a training frequency that works for us, our jobs, and our families. Its not how often you train, but the intent and intensity when you do. Don't train more, train wiser.

I totally agree. When I was young and single I trained daily but now I'm old, married and with children I only manage twice a week. BUT I thnk I'm learning more not less than I used to. FRequency of trainng isn't the issue but how you train.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2004, 09:54 AM   #10
philipsmith
Dojo: Ren Shin Kan
Location: Birmingham
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 356
United Kingdom
Offline
Re: Training frequency

Oops missed a bit!

Theres an old saying: "You can train for fifty years or train for one year and repeat it 50 times"
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2004, 10:50 AM   #11
Eric Cyr
Dojo: Deai Aikikai
Location: Ottawa, Ontario
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 9
Canada
Offline
Re: Training frequency

I am lucky because we have a classes every day. My suggestion, train as often as you can! You Like Aikido? I love it and train every day for three hours! I also teach on Mondays. That's right, Mondays! I'm recuperating right know from a torn ligament but this was not because of to much training, this was because I had a clouded mind due to exturnal factors.

The more you go the better you get. The better you get the more you understand. Then students look to you for advice and after a while you may just end up teaching them.

The trick to practicing more often from a physical point of view so as not to get hurt or damage your body is to gradualy change your schedule. It is drastic change that is damaging to your body. If you find that your schedule isn't enough try an additional class. You will find that your body is more accepting of gradual changes. If you stretch and do a good warm up before the beginning of the tecnique part of your class (I.E. 1/2 Hour) you increase the chances of lowering the risk of personal injury and as a Instructors point of view, lowering your students risk of injury. The more you engage in dayly physical activity the more your body becomes accustomed to it. After a while Ukemi becomes second nature and you do it without exurting as much energy. You also expand the chest cavity enabling your lungs to take in more oxigen than before. Practice breathing exercises and all the forementioned. If you find that your body becomes too stiff you might want to partake in yoga or get a Shiatsu massage.

The biggest and hardest wall you will run into is the mental barriers your mind creates. Your mind may become tired because of work or school or emotional matters. It is very important to clear your mind before and after practice. If you don't already you should engage in medatative activity. This doesn't mean bocome a monk, I mean take the time during your daily schedule to empty your mind, just clear it right out. Try doing this for about 1 minute at first then gradually build it up to 15 minutes and then longer. This is like endurance training for the mind. Always be mindful of the noise in your head like internal monolog. You will find that concentrating will become easier and you will find that all that noise or distractions your mind creates will go away.

You should express to your Sensei that you are interested in attending additional classes, S/He has better knowledge on this matter, maybe you aren't ready for the change just yet. I suggets that if your dojo doesn't have enough classes for you, speak to your Sensei or your Instructors. Sensei's especially like teaching eager hard working students like yourself. It may be that there aren't enough students to fill in an aditional class so you might also want to speak to students that are interested in participating. It is somewhat hard to teach Aikido to one person because you have to show what it is that you are doing. At spead or even slown down, the reciever is concentrating on their Ukemi. This can become mentally taxing for the student. Two students or more is preferred. If your Sensei or Instructors are engaged in other activities that prohibit them from adding classes to the weekly curiculum then maybe you could ask if you could come in on an Off day to practice Ukemi. This would require you to have a set of keys to the Dojo. Have you shown to your Sensei that you have earned that trust?

If none of these sugestions suffice then perhaps there is another Aikido Dojos in your Town or City, always speak to your Sensei before doing this. There are teachers that do have different views as to how Aikido is to be expressed and this creates political rifts and bitter rivalries. Your Sensei may think that your are jumping the fence so to speak when your sole intention is simply to add a class to your curiculum. Also when visting another Aikido Dojo your are your Dojo's embasador so be on your best behavior and act honorably. Visitor contributory fees are usually 5 dollars a class so inform yourself on how things work at the Dojo you are visiting.

It is a very good idea to consult your Sensei on all these forementioned points. You will find that you may have more impact when you express to your Sensei that your views are shared by other students in regards to adding classes to the weekly curriculum. This should be done in a non confrotational manner. In other words make sugestions not objections.

I wish you luck in your Indeavors
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2004, 11:32 AM   #12
ErinC
Location: Chicago
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 10
United_States
Offline
Smile Re: Training frequency

Dan,

Though I'm very new to Aikido, I'm not new to life, and I'm a firm believer that if YOU feel satisfied with the amount of time you are committing to Aikido, that's what's most important. It's more important than what anyone tells you you "should" or "could" be doing. Your experience with Aikido is going to be unique and personal, AND you will learn so much from the time you spend on the mat training with fellow students and under the guidance of your sensei.

And, if at some point, you desire to commit more than two training times per week to this martial art, consult your sensei about it and go for it. And, if you truly want to do that now, awesome. But, don't do it simpy because you think you "should". Do so because it's what you truly want.

YOU are the best authority on you. Trust that!

Peace,
Erin

Last edited by ErinC : 12-09-2004 at 11:35 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2004, 12:00 PM   #13
bryce_montgomery
 
bryce_montgomery's Avatar
Location: Tupelo, MS
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 180
United_States
Offline
Re: Training frequency

I completely have to agree with Lynn. My dojo trains 2 times one week then 3 times the next. These days are evenly spaced allow me to work around my school, work, and theatre schedules. This allows me enough practice that I can learn and rest during the week. So I completely have to agree with Lynn on this.

Bryce
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2004, 12:41 PM   #14
George S. Ledyard
 
George S. Ledyard's Avatar
Dojo: Aikido Eastside
Location: Bellevue, WA
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 2,670
Offline
Re: Training frequency

Quote:
Bryce Montgomery wrote:
I completely have to agree with Lynn. My dojo trains 2 times one week then 3 times the next. These days are evenly spaced allow me to work around my school, work, and theatre schedules. This allows me enough practice that I can learn and rest during the week. So I completely have to agree with Lynn on this.

Bryce
If you look at the teachers under whom we've all trained, in every case there was at least a period when all they did was train. I am talking about 6-7 days a week, often multiple classes per week. If these teachers are your model in terms of aspirations then I would recommend investigating how they got there.

In my own experience, I have not seen anyone develop real expertise training less than three times per week. For most adults this seems to be necessary. Kids seem to learn faster and can sometimes get at least competent on their basics doing twice a week. Based on this I require anyone who is aspiring to move through the high kyu ranks into Shodan to attend at least three times per week if they wish to test. There are certainly people who are good with motor skills who could meet the basic requirements for shodan training twice a week but in my opinion they aren't close to optimizing their potential so I require more of a commitment if they wish to get rank. If not, they can do what they want but they don't test.

I have people who average .5 times a week. For them it is important just to have a place to come train when they can get away from their very demanding lives. I appreciate the support they give to the dojo but they simply aren't training enough to get critical momentum towards developing spontaneous body movement.

George S. Ledyard
Aikido Eastside
Bellevue, WA
Aikido Eastside
AikidoDvds.Com
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2004, 11:55 PM   #15
Christy S
Location: Florida
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 18
United_States
Offline
Re: Training frequency

My father always says "Train as much as you can now, so when you can't, you'll have no regrets"
  Reply With Quote

Please visit our sponsor:

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!



Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Nage/Uke Dynamic - Guidelines senshincenter General 47 02-20-2006 06:20 PM
David's Drills Pauliina Lievonen General 34 02-05-2006 01:18 AM
committed attack/sensitive ukemi paradox Janet Rosen Training 30 10-13-2005 08:18 PM
yet another annoying cross training q Pdella General 92 10-01-2005 03:23 PM
*Really* Tough Training… jxa127 Training 29 05-09-2001 08:49 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:49 PM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2017 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2017 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate