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Old 03-29-2001, 12:24 PM   #1
Nathan Richmond
Dojo: Flint Dojo
Location: Flint
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 9
Offline
Hello,

I realize that in any martial art there is a chance of injury. However, I was exploring getting into BJJ and a member at this place told me that there are bound to be injuries when practicing BJJ. The main reason I have worry about this is because I can't afford to have an injury that would put me out of work. Such as a knee injury. Can anyone give me a general idea of what kinds of injuries are common and how servere they are?

thanks
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Old 03-29-2001, 12:39 PM   #2
ronin_10562
Dojo: NGA Ossining
Location: NY
Join Date: Feb 2001
Posts: 48
Offline
Like everything else if the instructor is skilled and the students are skilled then injuries are minimal. Common injury for new students are hyperextended elbow. Due to the student trying to hold out as long as possible, experienced students tap out quickly as soon as a good lock is applied even though there is no pain.

Walt

Walter Kopitov
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Old 03-29-2001, 02:46 PM   #3
lt-rentaroo
Join Date: Jul 2000
Posts: 237
Offline
Hello,

I agree with Mr. Kopitov. I've also noticed that new students are too stiff when working on techniques that involve joint locks. I'm not sure if this is a result of not properly stretching at the beginning of class or if the new students think that by being rigid they are less likely to get injured (which is not true).

My advice is to stretch your muscles and joints properly before and after class. Also, during a technique you should always "tap" the mat or signal your partner in some other fashion (hey, ow! that hurts) when they have properly applied the technique, this way they know you are uncomfortable.

Proper communication between training partners is critical in preventing injury. Cooperation is the key to successful and safe training. Have a good day.

LOUIS A. SHARPE, JR.
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Old 03-29-2001, 03:43 PM   #4
Matt Banks
Join Date: Dec 2000
Posts: 91
Offline
bjj

Quote:
Nathan Richmond wrote:
Hello,

I realize that in any martial art there is a chance of injury. However, I was exploring getting into BJJ and a member at this place told me that there are bound to be injuries when practicing BJJ. The main reason I have worry about this is because I can't afford to have an injury that would put me out of work. Such as a knee injury. Can anyone give me a general idea of what kinds of injuries are common and how servere they are?

thanks
Id say Ive done quite a bit of training in bjj and I wouldnt say that there are more injuries in it.This is because most clubs are over commercialised and rather than train hard, they like to sit around alot (my opinion). n.b. I didnt find this to be the case with the Gracie Barra uk guys but the other people ive trained with took a far to laid back approach to training. Of course that is only the experience ive had with the bjj clubs ive trained with. Formulate your own opinion, go and train with a local club and make your own opinion. As alot of its on the ground, you less worry of being hit or decked into the mat in a normal training sesion.

Stuff like kyokyushinkai karate is renowned for being tough in training. I know a guy who does it and he's always got some sort of injury.

Matt Banks

''Zanshin be aware hold fast your centre''
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Old 03-29-2001, 05:01 PM   #5
Jim23
Join Date: Jan 2001
Posts: 482
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Re: bjj

Quote:
Matt Banks wrote:

Stuff like kyokyushinkai karate is renowned for being tough in training. I know a guy who does it and he's always got some sort of injury.
Sounds like me a few years back.

Matt, I don't know if you saw my reply to your last post to me, as that entire thread mysteriously disappeared into thin air ... *poof*.

Jim23

Remember, all generalizations are false
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