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Old 06-02-2004, 01:59 AM   #26
Jorx
Dojo: Pärnu Aikidoclub Singitai
Location: Pärnu, Estonia
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 322
Estonia
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Re: Define your own warrior code for living?

You can't be a warrior within the context of Aikido...
simply because... you don't fight...
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Old 06-02-2004, 06:50 AM   #27
Ghost Fox
Dojo: Jikishinkan Dojo
Location: New York City (Brooklyn)
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 219
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Re: Define your own warrior code for living?

I personally try to follow the words of Aleister Crowley:

"Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law, and thou hast no right but to do thy will. Love is the Law, Love under Will."

and

"Every man and every woman is a star."
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Old 06-02-2004, 10:10 PM   #28
Troy
 
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Dojo: Yellow Springs Aikido
Location: Fairborn, Oh
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 50
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Re: Define your own warrior code for living?

Quote:
Jorgen Matsi wrote:
You can't be a warrior within the context of Aikido...
simply because... you don't fight...
This is not true. Being a warrior means that you can fight as well as defend. You can protect yourself and still be called a Warrior. You don't have to fight to be a warrior of Honor. Being a gentleman, and doing the right things, while taking a Budo, you can still be classified a Warrior. It's a mind set, and how you feel about your Honor. I think of myself as a Warrior because I try to protect who and what I care about. In Aikido we fight the enimy within. We defeat our attackers from the inside out, with minimal injury to oneself or to the attacker.

"To win without blood-shed, that is the skill of a true Samurai." -Kojimada

"The Art of Peace is the religion that is not a religion; it perfects and completes all religions."
-Morihei Ueshiba
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Old 06-03-2004, 12:25 AM   #29
jgros
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 21
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Re: Define your own warrior code for living?

Quote:
Drew Ames wrote:
Bottom line: I'm not a warrior and don't want to be. Studying aikido no more makes one a warrior than standing in a garage makes one a car.

My code is based on my upbringing, religious beliefs, and life experiences. Aikido complements and enhances my sense of ethics when it comes to conflicts. It does not define them.
This reminds me of the SATs.
Apple is to orange as fork is to......
A. Flamingo
B. Lawn chair
C. Knife
D. Steven Seagal

The correct answer would be (not Steven Seagal, even though I know thats what everyone was thinking!! ) C, as apples and oranges are both fruits, just as a knife and a fork are both dinner utensils.

I believe the comparison you are making is incorrect.

To stand in a dojo does not make one a martial artist, just as standing in a garage does not make you a car.

Studying aikido in a dojo makes you an Aikidoka. Studying car maintenance while standing in a garage makes you.....lets say......mechanic in training.

Ok, moving past semantics. Studying aikido makes you an Aikidoka (dojo or not, I just used it before because it fit better). A warrior is someone who has engaged in battle or is experienced in battle, agreed? So then we can conclude that a warrior, is someone who has participated in war. I think that we as Aikidoka, are something close to warrior but not quite the same (unless of course, you have actual combat experience). We are students of war. To practice Aikido is to practice war; being ready for the day that it may come, and praying it doesn't. I believe that to understand war, is to understand one of the very core parts of human nature. We have come to understand that there must be no hesitation. We must cut, or not cut. There is no in between. Full intention. Life or death in one moment. As Aikidoka or martial artists....or whatever..we do not seek death, but we try to understand death, to know death, to embrace it; so that we may truly live. To truly have peace we must prepare for war. Although we train for different reasons, whether they be physical, or psychological, I believe that if we do come to know these things in our hearts, we will not progress far as Aikidoka.

That said, I would rather have an experienced warrior by my side in a battle than an Aikidoka any day. The warrior probably has learned enough.. "lack of hesitation" and general experience to keep danger from coming from the flank he occupies. But I would rather have the Aikidoka with me outside of battle. Outside of battle, killing usually isn't very legal, and even if it is, has unintended side effects. Plus, Aikidoka are just so much more versatile

As Drew said, Aikido should complement your philosophy, not define it. Not being a warrior is Drew's choice just as his occupation or religious and political beliefs are his choice. As I am assuming that everyone is living in a country where most of these freedoms are still at least partially preserved, let us be thankful, and pray that it remains that way. To stick with topic, i would say that my "code" is the following:
1.) make sure no one tampers with the constitution, as once a freedom goes away, it never comes back without war or great strife.
2.) Be respectful and loyal to your family and friends, but especially family. Most everyone moves around, and makes new friends, but you only have one family. They are the ones that well help you when all of your "friends" suddenly disappear.
3.) Do not hang around people who don't respect you, because sooner or later the dagger will seek your backside.
4.) Be tolerant of others. You may not agree with their views and preferences, but the great thing about living in a free country is being able to voice your opinion. Listen, and present counter arguments, but never suppress their opinions.
5.) "Only a hungry man wants of food". Basically, people will only receive your wisdom when they know they need it. Otherwise, they are simply not interested, and it is not your right to press it on them. Everyone you respect deserves two warnings, no more no less. Anything more and you are annoying and trying to run their lives. Anything less, and you are not really a friend.

Ok thats enough for now. Take to heart anything you liked, and ignore anything that really pissed you off. Take care.

jgros
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Old 06-03-2004, 09:50 AM   #30
Bronson
 
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Re: Define your own warrior code for living?

Quote:
Jeff Gros wrote:
I think that we as Aikidoka, are something close to warrior
I think that if I were a combat veteran that statement would piss me off.



Quote:
Jeff Gros wrote:
We are students of war. To practice Aikido is to practice war; being ready for the day that it may come, and praying it doesn't. I believe that to understand war, is to understand one of the very core parts of human nature.
I think that to understand war you have to experience it. To study war can make you knowledgable about it but I don't think anyone who's never been in it could possibly understand anything about it. It'd be like me reading books on the Vietnam or Gulf wars and then telling veterans I understand what they went through. If I did that I would hope they socked me in the head.

Quote:
Jeff Gros wrote:
As Aikidoka or martial artists....or whatever..we do not seek death, but we try to understand death, to know death, to embrace it; so that we may truly live.
I seek to embrace life. Death will take care of itself.

Bronson

"A pacifist is not really a pacifist if he is unable to make a choice between violence and non-violence. A true pacifist is able to kill or maim in the blink of an eye, but at the moment of impending destruction of the enemy he chooses non-violence."
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Old 06-09-2004, 07:06 AM   #31
justMe
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 11
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Re: Define your own warrior code for living?

My reaction to this thread is mixed. From one perspective, this post seems to be very reminiscent of those that ask about immersion into Japanese culture, philosophy, and spirituality and just how necessary these things are to be an effective Aikidoka. My response has always been "not very." I have always felt that continued self improvement, physically, intellectually and spiritually and the effort to develop these is what makes one an effective student. The Japanese, while certainly having much to contribute which is study-worthy, are not the sole source to draw from.

My second thought is that codes for living are fine, if you are just beginning to live. However, putting life on hold while you look up what your reaction should be in various situations against some rule book is frankly ludicrous. Many replys have stated that standing up for that which is right is part of their code. I would like to take one step back from there and focus on how we define for ourselves just what is right and what is wrong. That brings me back to what I said earlier about continued self improvement. These things need to become part of our personalities so that we no longer need some "code". How we react becomes an expression of who we are. Eventually the religious tomes and philosophy books need to be closed and we need to go out into the world and do the best we can.

This is a bit rambling and I am not even sure I am conveying what I intend. Enjoy!
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