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Old 06-18-2003, 08:53 AM   #1
gasman
 
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Dojo: Sunyata
Location: Oslo
Join Date: Aug 2002
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recovery - wrist injury

broke my scaffoloid (sp) in early march and spent 3 months in cast. removed the cast a couple of weeks ago and will remove the pins next week.

the wrist is completely stiff which is a bit shit because i used to be super flexible. i have noticed some improvement bending the hand outward, but inward is impossible (and I cant see anyone doing nikkyo on me for a long while)

my hope is that once the pins are removed I can start working on the inward bend again.

anyone here with experience from similar injuries? can it be trained back to normal (or close enough)? how long will it take?
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Old 06-18-2003, 09:04 AM   #2
happysod
Dojo: Kiburn, London, UK
Location: London
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Sigurd, my only pin-work was my thumb & forearm, worst injury was a broken pelvis. Both have healed to "almost" normal, but the length of time will depend on how well you follow your physio's advice. I'd guess at least 6 months to a year before you stop noticing the injury, but you should be able to train after a few months (again, check with quack first). Unfortunately, if it wasn't a clean break, you will never get full flexibility back, but at least you'll have a dandy weather sense for those cold Northerly rains.
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Old 06-18-2003, 09:28 AM   #3
SmilingNage
Location: NJ
Join Date: Oct 2000
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I had a severe wrist injury some 9 yrs before I started Aikido. I had broken both bones in my right arm, one a clean break, the other a greenstick fracture. Normally pins would have been used, but since I had just eaten no surgery for me.

After 3 months in a cast, the ulna bone is offset ever so slightly making that wrist a bit more prone to nikkyo. But there are some flexibility issues, but they dont interefere much. Most times it means I have to tap just a little quicker.

Dont make me, make you, grab my wrist.
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Old 06-18-2003, 12:03 PM   #4
Kevin Wilbanks
Location: Seattle/Southern Wisconsin
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I advise getting yourself to a ruthless Physical or Occupational Therapist ASAP. It's crucial to do aggressive range-of-motion exercises to rehab injured joints. Doing it right seems to tend to involve pushing harder and taking more pain than one would generally do on one's own, yet not so much that injury/re-injury results... hence the need for the guidance of a good therapist. I have heard some say that this is especially important with the hand.
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Old 06-18-2003, 01:40 PM   #5
aikidoc
Dojo: Aikido of Midland
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Hei pa deg:

Min bestefar kommer fra Trondheim.

There is a good physical therapist named Freddie kaltenberg (I believe) who does a lot of work with extremities. I saw him at a Chiropractic Seminar in California. I think he is in Oslo if he is still alive (he was getting up there when I saw him).

Sounds like a pretty bad break.

Hilsen,

John
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Old 06-18-2003, 01:57 PM   #6
Bronson
 
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Quote:
It's crucial to do aggressive range-of-motion exercises to rehab injured joints. Doing it right seems to tend to involve pushing harder and taking more pain than one would generally do on one's own, yet not so much that injury/re-injury results...
One of the judo guys (Chris) at our dojo had a bad elbow dislocation a little less than a year ago. The bruising went from the back of his hand up into his chest Five months later he took third in an international competition in Venezuala. He said much the same thing as Kevin. The P.T. was hard on him and even allowed Chris's brother who is a shodan in judo to help by helping Chris straighten his arm...ouch.

After my dad suffered his stroke and was going through P.T. & O.T. he was surprised by how "ruthless and remorseless" (his words) they were. However, because of that he can walk with only a slight limp and can function on his own in day to day activities.

Get a good P.T. that won't listen to whining You can hate them all you want but just do what they say.

Good luck,

Bronson

"A pacifist is not really a pacifist if he is unable to make a choice between violence and non-violence. A true pacifist is able to kill or maim in the blink of an eye, but at the moment of impending destruction of the enemy he chooses non-violence."
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Old 06-18-2003, 02:24 PM   #7
jeda
Location: Phoenix, AZ
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PT really stands for "pain and torture" not physcial therapy.

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Old 06-18-2003, 03:33 PM   #8
Jim ashby
Dojo: Phoenix Coventry
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My sister is a physiotherapist in the UK. Most of the stuff she does would get you thown out of the SS for cruelty, the first part of their training is when they have a sympathy bypass operation. That being said, the exercises she gave me after I broke the distal end of my radius were painful but very effective!

Have fun.

Vir Obesus Stola Saeptus
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Old 06-18-2003, 05:27 PM   #9
aikidoc
Dojo: Aikido of Midland
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Sigurd:

That's Freddie Kaltenborn-sorry for the error.

Hilsen,

John
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Old 06-19-2003, 04:01 AM   #10
gasman
 
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Thanks for all the nice replies.

Next week, when I remove the pins, the doctors will probably refer me to physiotherapy. I'll look into that Kaltenborn chap, however I would have to pay out of my own pocket if I decided to take treatment other than what is offered. We'll see how it goes.

My sensei is a fully trained shiatsu practitioner and will probably sort me out with something too.

Coincidentally I talked to a (nice) girl at the pub yesterday, she'd broken the same bone last year and pretty much told me what you have. What reassured me was that her flexibility on the injured wrist was almost back to normal, although she was troubled with some motoric damage and pains in the joint. I don't seem to have these problems though, perhaps as a result of extensive work on the wrist through aikido practice.

Thank God, i have full strenght in the fingers and the joint, it's only the flexing that is problematic. Oh and a light tingly sensation in my little and ring finger, but it is diminishing.

ma'a el salaam

Sigurd

Ps trøndere overalt jo
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Old 04-19-2004, 09:24 PM   #11
gasman
 
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Re: recovery - wrist injury

bump.

its been a while now and I just want to say that the wrist is next to fine now. slightly less flexible than before, I can feel the nikkyos are a bit more painful, but all in all fully functional. now for my shoulder, I tried snowboarding in january and can still feel that front face landing in my right shoulder...
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