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Old 11-26-2001, 11:41 AM   #26
akiy
 
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Rokkyo, in my opinion, is not a technique about strain nor pressure on the elbow but about unbalancing uke...

-- Jun

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Old 11-26-2001, 05:44 PM   #27
deepsoup
Dojo: Sheffield Shodokan Dojo
Location: Sheffield, UK
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Quote:
Originally posted by wildaikido

1) I study Yoseikan Aikido and we have a number of judoish reaps and sweeps. I have found that they are very useful but they are also very much a beginner's technique. One of the senseis always quotes 70-30, that is 70% kuzushi (unbalancing) and 30% reaping. So if you have a good movement and good timing (like Osensei) then there is never actually a need to use your foot. To explain better we have O Soto Gari, which is in every way like Kata Otoshi except instead of dropping our weight to 'throw' uke back we reap instead. (If you don't know Kata Otoshi see Roy Suenaka's Complete Aikido pg246. A good book)

<I've snipped the bit about rokkyu..>

3) Sean where in Sheffield do you train, if you don't mind me asking
1) I've never had the chance to try Yoseikan Aikido. It sounds like something I'd really enjoy!

3) I dont mind you asking in the least.

Mostly I train in Shodokan aikido, at the Sheffield Kyogikan dojo (Which is also the dojo of the Sheffield University Shodokan Aikido Club.) Our instructor is Scott Allbright (4th dan JAA). We've moved a couple of times, but currently we have a nice little dojo of our own right in the centre of the city.

Recently, I've also been training on a semi-regular basis with my local 'traditional' aikido club, which is the Sheffield Hallam University aikido club. (Sheffield has two universities.) The club is affiliated to the Kai Shin Kai, and most sessions there are taught by either Paul Turner or Roger Grant. (Both 2nd dan KSK)

Why do you ask, Graham?

Sean
x

Last edited by deepsoup : 11-26-2001 at 05:47 PM.
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Old 11-27-2001, 04:44 AM   #28
wildaikido
Dojo: Hans de Jong Self Defence School
Location: Perth
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Jun that is exactly how I feel. The school tends to stand to much with Hiji Kudaki and the kuzushi stops when you have a good lock on ukes arm (to much jujutsu influence ) I always tell people that we might stop there in training but if you use the technique outside you have to unbalance uke down to the mat.

Sean in response I was born in Rotherham and a year and a half ago I went back to England and had the pleasure of training with a Tomiki group at the Sheffield tennis club, I think the sensei's name was Martin. I was going to get you to say 'G day' for me but I think you train with a different group.
Unfortunately Yoseikan is limited in numbers it has a small following here in Western Australia, A nice sized organisation in the US and Canada, of course Japan and mostly in France, that is where Mochizuki Sensei is now living with his son.
Next time I am in the country maybe we can get together and train

Graham Wild
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Old 11-28-2001, 06:09 PM   #29
deepsoup
Dojo: Sheffield Shodokan Dojo
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Quote:
Originally posted by wildaikido
Sean in response I was born in Rotherham and a year and a half ago I went back to England and had the pleasure of training with a Tomiki group at the Sheffield tennis club, I think the sensei's name was Martin. I was going to get you to say 'G day' for me but I think you train with a different group.
Small world.
(But as Steve Wright said, you wouldn't want to paint it.)

I do train with a different group, I'm afraid. If the Tomiki group you're talking about are the guys who train up at Norton, we may have said hi at a seminar or a tournament, but I've never trained with them.

Quote:
Unfortunately Yoseikan is limited in numbers it has a small following here in Western Australia, A nice sized organisation in the US and Canada, of course Japan and mostly in France, that is where Mochizuki Sensei is now living with his son.
Next time I am in the country maybe we can get together and train
Next time you're in the country by all means drop me a mail, I'm sure I'd enjoy training with you.

Meanwhile, France isn't so far away, so maybe I'll get to try a little Yoseikan at a seminar one of these days.

Sean
x
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Old 12-29-2003, 09:16 PM   #30
dion
Dojo: san diego aikikai
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we use leg sweeps in our dojo sometimes, just as an added bonus to a throw or takedown.

San Diego Aikikai
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Old 12-29-2003, 11:53 PM   #31
L. Camejo
 
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Off and again I tend to show the leg sweep variants of techs to folks who are interested in self defence applications and so desire to throw folks as quickly as possible in the event their technique is not set up properly to work without the sweep. Generally though, when we used leg sweeps in class, my Sensei tended to remind us that we were training Aikido and not Judo .

I tend not to let em focus too much on the sweep as (in my humble opinion) it can become a way of "getting around" executing "proper" Aikido technique via effective tai-sabaki, kuzushi and positioning.

Sean: Since visiting an Aikikai dojo I've figured out a version of koshi nage based on how we set up for tenkai kotegaeshi or mae otoshi in the randori no kata. This version tends to resemble Judo's kata guruma a bit. The sukui nage that we do in the goshin no kata also provides an effective setup for koshi nage.

There is also a version we do that is based on the setup for ude hineri on the non-attacking hand. A similar version of the second one is shown here

http://www.aikido-world.com/highligh...0Angle%201.htm

I tend to believe that Tomiki included the principles of pretty much every Aikido technique somewhere within the Randori no Kata. By training at other styles I tend to see where the similarities lie with our own training system and work from there.

Hoping to visit you guys in 2004 to get some high level training in with Scott. Hope you guys have a great new year.

Btw, finally got my belt from Shodokan Honbu

L.C.

--Mushin Mugamae - No Mind No Posture. He who is possessed by nothing possesses everything.--
http://www.tntaikido.org
http://www.mushinkan.ca
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Old 01-02-2004, 02:13 PM   #32
deepsoup
Dojo: Sheffield Shodokan Dojo
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Quote:
Larry Camejo (L. Camejo) wrote:
Sean: Since visiting an Aikikai dojo I've figured out a version of koshi nage based on how we set up for tenkai kotegaeshi or mae otoshi in the randori no kata. This version tends to resemble Judo's kata guruma a bit. The sukui nage that we do in the goshin no kata also provides an effective setup for koshi nage.

<some snippage>

Hoping to visit you guys in 2004 to get some high level training in with Scott. Hope you guys have a great new year.

Btw, finally got my belt from Shodokan Honbu
Sounds interesting. If you're going to be in the UK, maybe you could show me.

Excellent news, btw. When are you thinking of visiting the UK, and for how long?

Do you know about the Skenfrith course?

Its our main annual Shodokan seminar over here, at the end of May. We usually have some excellent visiting instructors. (Last year we were lucky to get a visit from Mr Sato, one of Shihan's former uchi-deshi, and an excellent teacher in his own right.)

There is talk of this year's course being something special in honour of Bob Forrest-Webb's 60 years of budo training.

Let me know off list if there's anything I can do to help out. It'll be good to finally meet you.

Sean

x

ps: Congratulations on the belt, yours was even longer coming than the norm. Japan to the Caribbean via Brighton, it must have covered more miles than just about anyone elses!

Last edited by deepsoup : 01-02-2004 at 02:16 PM.
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