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Old 10-06-2003, 06:14 PM   #1
Amassus
 
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Dojo: Aikido Musubi Ryu/ Yoshin Wadokan
Location: Hamilton
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New Zealand
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Different Styles

Hello all!

In the weekend I went to another dojo to train with them. When I got there, aikidoka from three different styles had arrived.

I had a great time learning how other clubs and styles go through techniques such as Ikkyo, shihonage, tai no henka (spelling?) and many others. I walked away from the training with a more open mind and I'm sure my techniques are better because of it.

I'll be going to my club tonight revitalised and eager to learn more!

I found last time I attended another club, my motivation was kicked into hyperdrive.


Do those reading this find the same thing?

"flows like water, reflects like a mirror, and responds like an echo." Chaung-tse
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Old 10-07-2003, 06:20 AM   #2
Bronson
 
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Re: Different Styles

Quote:
Dean Suter (Amassus) wrote:
Do those reading this find the same thing?

Absolutely. It's always fun to see how other instructors or styles approach something. Whenever I get the chance to go to a different instructors class it kick-starts my own practice.

Bronson

"A pacifist is not really a pacifist if he is unable to make a choice between violence and non-violence. A true pacifist is able to kill or maim in the blink of an eye, but at the moment of impending destruction of the enemy he chooses non-violence."
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Old 10-07-2003, 07:39 AM   #3
MikeE
 
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Absolutely! I am in total agreement with Bronson.

Mike Ellefson
Midwest Center
For Movement &
Aikido Bukou
Dojos
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Old 10-07-2003, 07:43 AM   #4
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
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Yes, that is why I try to put a lot of energy into the John Stevens East Coast Seminars, and events like the upcoming Utada/Ikeda Sensei Friendship seminar (info at http://www.yoshinkai.org/doshinkan/f...hipseminar.php). I think not only are aikidoka mixing at the lower levels, but at the instructor level as well, to the benefit of all of us. Keep it up!

Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
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Old 10-07-2003, 07:45 AM   #5
Peter Goldsbury
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It depends how good you are.

I would not normally allow my own students to go to other dojo unless they had grasped the basic framework of the art, as I have taught them.

Once they have grasped this, then cross-training is fine: it provides welcome feedback for me.

Best,

P A Goldsbury
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Old 10-07-2003, 09:48 AM   #6
happysod
Dojo: Kiburn, London, UK
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Peter, I'm intrigued - do you follow any guidelines (e.g. rank or time served) or is a sensei fiat for this permission?

Dean, yep, I have enjoyed most of my extra-ciricular dojo visits. We used to try and nab the better teachers for a home visit at the dojo as well.
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Old 10-07-2003, 10:32 AM   #7
ian
 
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Yep - absolutely. Any sensei that says his style is the best or only one for you has something to fear! Aikido is a path you walk alone!

Ian

---understanding aikido is understanding the training method---
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Old 10-07-2003, 06:51 PM   #8
PeterR
 
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Quote:
Ian Dodkins (ian) wrote:
Yep - absolutely. Any sensei that says his style is the best or only one for you has something to fear! Aikido is a path you walk alone!
Unless of course he is.

Seriously - I don't think Aikido is a path you walk alone. A good teacher is essential and your dojo mates are all important.

Yes it is SELF deveolpement but not SELF absorbed.

Peter Rehse Shodokan Aikido
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Old 10-07-2003, 08:04 PM   #9
L. Camejo
 
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Tonight at class I was reminded of the other side to cross training in another style by a student of mine. The situation where the Sensei in the other dojo tells you that pretty much everything you have learnt (and as a result tend to do almost second nature) are all totally wrong simply because of minor stylistic differences and approaches to Aikido training.

Had a student who had problems with another Sensei for slapping with the trailing hand during a forward roll, which is a norm for us.... he was told that it was incorrect and thus got very confused, especially when trying to roll in a way that seemed very unnatural and unrealistic.

Personally though, I love to train in other styles, tends to make the style I usually do look even better and it always gives me food for thought with regards to technical or philosophical concepts that I may not address on a regular basis.

Would be good for the open mind towards training to be shared by both students and Senseis alike though.

My 2 cents.

L.C.

Last edited by L. Camejo : 10-07-2003 at 08:10 PM.

--Mushin Mugamae - No Mind No Posture. He who is possessed by nothing possesses everything.--
http://www.tntaikido.org
http://www.mushinkan.ca
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Old 10-08-2003, 04:38 PM   #10
deepsoup
Dojo: Sheffield Shodokan Dojo
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Re: Different Styles

Quote:
Dean Suter (Amassus) wrote:
In the weekend I went to another dojo to train with them. When I got there, aikidoka from three different styles had arrived.<snippage>

Do those reading this find the same thing?
I went through a phase a while ago, where I was cross-training pretty regularly at another local dojo.

These days, I dont have quite as much time to train, but more importantly, my approach to my 'base' style has become a bit more focussed.

Now when I occasionally do train in other styles, where I used to think "hey, this is totally different", now I find myself thinking "hey, this is just the same".

I guess I've just come to understand my 'primary' style a bit better - as a complete system - and consequently, even though the 'second' dojo has excellent teachers teaching good, solid, aikido, I find I dont really miss the cross-training.

(Except the people - lovely, friendly people - I really should go visit them sometime soon.)

Sean

x
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Old 10-08-2003, 10:15 PM   #11
Amassus
 
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Thanks for the feedback so far.

I am enjoying the posts. I can see that people are at different places in their aikido training. For me (as basically a beginner) cross training is fun and allows me to see how other styles do similar techniques. A guess over time I would have 'seen it all' or found yet another facet of the aikido culture that intrigues me.

I am lucky in that I work with one of my club's shodans and can talk to him openly about aikido training and philosophy. Its like having an instructor around all the working week!

Due to this, I think I have a good insight into my club's style.

I don't think my cross training is damaging my aikido in any way but I must add I have been selective as to which clubs I visit. I am going to clubs recommended by my work colleague.

I respect him as a person and an aikidoka so I trust in his choices. So far he hasn't disappointed.

"flows like water, reflects like a mirror, and responds like an echo." Chaung-tse
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Old 10-09-2003, 08:19 AM   #12
aikidoc
Dojo: Aikido of Midland
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It is good to see such an open mind set on training with other styles/affiliations. There are some who never venture beyond their own master instructor. IMHO it narrows one's perspective on the art when all you have is what your instructor has presented to you. You may decide you don't like a particular point of view or approach but at least you have experienced it. Unfortunately, this is not encouraged by all instructors.

I do agree with Peter though that you need some rudimentary skills to experience other techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the basics of your own style how can you possibly make a fair comparison or enjoy the experience of another style.
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Old 10-09-2003, 08:30 AM   #13
SeiserL
 
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Re: Different Styles

Quote:
Dean Suter (Amassus) wrote:
Do those reading this find the same thing?
Yep. I find training with other styles is great to be exposed to the difference in application and focus.

Expands my Aikido.

Also makes me appreciate what I have.

Lynn Seiser PhD
Yondan Aikido & FMA/JKD
We do not rise to the level of our expectations, but fall to the level of our training. Train well. KWATZ!
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