Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > General

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 02-05-2003, 03:53 AM   #1
Shrike
 
Shrike's Avatar
Dojo: Budoviikingit, Vuosaari http://www.budoviikingit.org/
Location: Kallio, Helsinki, Finland
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 9
Offline
Question Aikido and other styles

Hey,

I've just started learning another style of budo alongside my Aikido training, its called Tauramusoryu Kobujutsu.

What i would like to know is what styles do you think support your Aikido learning and work well with that?

Cheers.

- Shrike -
"It's Just A Ride" -Bill Hicks
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2003, 05:15 AM   #2
Kensai
Location: South West UK
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 216
Offline
Well, I believe its down to the person. In some respects Aikido is a very complete system, especially in defence. So another system is not really needed. However, O Sensei did have alot of styles under his belt and I think the different perspectives that they gave him helped his ability to become invicible.

I train in Judo as well, this is because I really like grappling and the fully resisting attacker really helps me to understand Aikido better.

My advice would be to have Aikido has your base, then add on bits that you personally really enjoy. As I dont like Kicking, I dont train in it, however for those that do, study Karate or TKD for example.

Just IMHO ofcourse.

"Minimum Effort, Maximum Effciency."
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2003, 08:00 AM   #3
SeiserL
 
SeiserL's Avatar
Location: Florida Gulf coast
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 3,873
United_States
Offline
IMHO, just pick another style you want to study if you want to cross train. Some people like to train in something that is similiar in principle to support, as you said. Other of us like to train in something that compliments or balances Aikido. I personally also training in FMA (Filipino martial arts: kali/escrima).

Until again,

Lynn

Lynn Seiser PhD
Yondan Aikido & FMA/JKD
We do not rise to the level of our expectations, but fall to the level of our training. Train well. KWATZ!
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2003, 08:56 AM   #4
bob_stra
Location: Australia
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 641
Australia
Offline
Re: Aikido and other styles

Quote:
Jukka Kolehmainen (Shrike) wrote:
Hey,

I've just started learning another style of budo alongside my Aikido training, its called Tauramusoryu Kobujutsu.

What i would like to know is what styles do you think support your Aikido learning and work well with that?

Cheers.
It depends on circumstances and on the persons interests. For example, I always wanted to try FMA, except there's none of it near by, so that's no good for me ;-)

Judo, because it has all sorts of "Murphy Law" moments. I figure, if you learn to do an ogoshi during randori, you've got a fairly good appreciation of it for real life.

Boxing for the same reason re: punching

Wrestling for the same reason re: close contact

MMA for the same reason re: fighting

Actually, the stuff that best supports my aikido is Feldenkrais, but that's not a martial art - more of an investigation of movement. Perhaps taichi, pakua, gymnastics, contact improv, break-dancing etc could serve a similar purpose but with a different flavour?

Finally, I have a friend who swears by "fencing" (western and eastern styles).
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2003, 06:59 PM   #5
mattholmes
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 40
Offline
I personally am an advocate for training in a linear style. I think this provides an excellent base for finding the importance of the circular/sprial characteristic of aikido. I'm sure this works the other way around as well (I'm assuming that one wishes to keep aikido as the central style). Also, I find that a straight line striking style can really help out in those situations where your uke/attacker/future friend is one of those big and not-going-to-move types. Just some thoughts.

Matt
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2003, 08:12 PM   #6
Grasshopper
Dojo: Caulfield
Location: Australia
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 18
Offline
I've always thought I'd pick up kendo or iaijutsu after gaining a few more years of aikido experience... Is there anyone out there who's done that that can share their thoughts?

Yoroshiku!

"Respect your elders. Take care of your juniors."
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2003, 08:44 PM   #7
Bronson
 
Bronson's Avatar
Dojo: Seiwa Dojo and Southside Dojo
Location: Battle Creek & Kalamazoo, MI
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 1,677
Offline
The stuff I learned in tai chi blended nicely into what I later learned in aikido. Right now I'm taking iaido along with aikido, but not really to add to my aikido I just wanted to take iaido
Quote:
Finally, I have a friend who swears by "fencing" (western and eastern styles).
I fenced for a while before/during aikido. Looking back I think fencing really helped me with timing, instant/explosive speed, accuracy, and reading the opponents body language. The medieval armored combat I did helped with getting off-line and irimi. There's just something about moving right into someone who is trying to hit you in the head with a six foot pole with a 4lb weight on the end....what a rush

Bronson

"A pacifist is not really a pacifist if he is unable to make a choice between violence and non-violence. A true pacifist is able to kill or maim in the blink of an eye, but at the moment of impending destruction of the enemy he chooses non-violence."
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2003, 01:51 AM   #8
sanosuke
Dojo: Seigi Dojo
Location: Jakarta
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 247
Indonesia
Offline
i heard that taichi really click with aikido, but i think it depends on the person which martial arts they want to learn. I took up TKD instead, and i find that tai sabaki is really helpful in sparring.
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2003, 02:25 PM   #9
Kent Enfield
 
Kent Enfield's Avatar
Location: Oregon, USA
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 224
United_States
Offline
Quote:
Diana Hope (Grasshopper) wrote:
I've always thought I'd pick up kendo or iaijutsu after gaining a few more years of aikido experience... Is there anyone out there who's done that that can share their thoughts?
I have, so I will.

I do both kendo and iaido. Iaido ought to teach you a lot about proper cutting technique, and moving in all sorts of ways you probably havn't thought of before (like turning and advancing while coming up out of seiza).

Kendo teaches a lot about attacking, both how and when. You'd probably also discover just how difficult it is to deal with a properly executed attack. The carried over benefits to my aikido have been a huge improvement to my striking skills, and the ability to quickly follow up an unsuccessful attack.

Kentokuseisei
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2003, 03:04 AM   #10
bob_stra
Location: Australia
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 641
Australia
Offline
Quote:
Kent Enfield wrote:
Kendo teaches a lot about attacking, both how and when. You'd probably also discover just how difficult it is to deal with a properly executed attack. The carried over benefits to my aikido have been a huge improvement to my striking skills, and the ability to quickly follow up an unsuccessful attack.
I have to admit a great curiosity for sword arts of all types.

I am curious to know how kendo and iado have improved your striking, especially following up after an unsucessful attack. I thought kendo was practiced as "one strike, one kill" (at least from the tv competition footage I've seen). Is there an element of randori / free play in kendo?
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2003, 04:34 AM   #11
gasman
 
gasman's Avatar
Dojo: Sunyata
Location: Oslo
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 114
Offline
i trained TKD and taichi before I was lucky enough to come across aikido.

IMO all martial training benefits aikido as aikido benefits training in all other styles.

For fistwork I personally find chinese styles more interesting than japanese. For kicking, TKD seems like the natural option, however this style has a very repetitive training philosophy and thus has the highest injury rate as far as I know. I had to stop training TKD due to a badly strained senew in my right hip.

While I still benefit from the kick training in TKD, I found that the taichi, both techniques, stances and philosophy, was more portable into aikido.

In martial taichi you have closed and open hand attacks, grabs and (mostly low) kicks. All of which are excellent for atemi.

But I do somewhat miss full force training and have been considering taking up either boxing or jiujitsu at some point. I think that training full force will aid my aikido very much, but I would be reluctant to start combining arts as a novice. Better to get a stepping stone in place before going on to the next.

to sum up: I guess it is up to the individual, really...
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2003, 07:03 AM   #12
paul keessen
Dojo: Takemusu Aikido Hilversum
Location: Hilversum, Holland
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 12
Offline
as long as you don't get confused, training in more martial arts is good!! lot's of people do it! i think most peope will get more creative by different training!

peace!
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2003, 10:58 AM   #13
Ghost Fox
Dojo: Jikishinkan Dojo
Location: New York City (Brooklyn)
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 219
Offline
I'm not speaking out against cross training, Goddess knows I've done my share.

I was wondering if any aikidoka have dedicated serious time to cross training within the Aikido? (e.g. Shodan in Yoshinkan, weapon scrolls from Iwama, Nidan from Aikikai Hombu, Sandan from ASU)
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2003, 11:26 AM   #14
deepsoup
Dojo: Sheffield Shodokan Dojo
Location: Sheffield, UK
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 524
Offline
Quote:
Damion Lost (Ghost Fox) wrote:
I was wondering if any aikidoka have dedicated serious time to cross training within the Aikido? (e.g. Shodan in Yoshinkan, weapon scrolls from Iwama, Nidan from Aikikai Hombu, Sandan from ASU)
Tetsuro Nariyama, the current technical director of the Shodokan, might be a good example of that.

His main teacher was Kenji Tomiki, but he also spent six years training as a deshi of Hirokazu Kobayashi. (At the request of Professor Tomiki, I believe.) Whilst training under Kobayashi Sensei, Mr Nariyama became an Aikikai 5th dan. (He's an 8th dan in Shodokan).

Sean

x
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2003, 01:50 PM   #15
Kent Enfield
 
Kent Enfield's Avatar
Location: Oregon, USA
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 224
United_States
Offline
Quote:
Bob Strahinjevich (bob_stra) wrote:
I am curious to know how kendo and iado [sic] have improved your striking, especially following up after an unsucessful attack. I thought kendo was practiced as "one strike, one kill" (at least from the tv competition footage I've seen). Is there an element of randori / free play in kendo?
There's an enormous free play element in kendo, usually called jigeiko. Most clubs do jigeiko every practice. Some practices are entirely jigeiko.

It's hard to explain how kendo has improved my stiking, but I'll try. I think most of it has to do with utilizing the whole body in a coordinated manner, as well as a better sense of what is actually open and what isn't.

As to the folling up stuff, one of the cardinal rules of kendo is to always be ready to attack. Even immediately after executing an attack. So there's not the "attack and freeze" that one unfortunately sees with a lot of aikido. If you've ever seen kendo, that's what all the running through after an attack is about. If you're at a good striking distance, chances are that your opponent is too, so you don't want to stay there.

The goal is definetely "one cut, one kill," but you never assume that it worked. You always keep the option of attacking again open.

Kentokuseisei
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2003, 05:36 PM   #16
Daniel Blanco
Dojo: Suffolk Aikikai
Location: Patchogue
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 98
Offline
MY GENERAL ANSWER TO CROSS TRAINING IS THAT IT CAN BE SOME WHAT CONFUSING; ESPECIALLY TO A BEGINNER. YOU CAN DEDICATE MORE TIME TO ONE STYLE TIL THE ART COMES NATURAL. I AM A LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICER AND AIKIDO HAS PROVEN ITSELF TO ME REPEATEDLY.TRAINING IN ONE STYLE WORKS FOR ME . PLEASE REPLY.
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2003, 07:06 PM   #17
akiy
 
akiy's Avatar
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 5,987
Offline
Daniel, can you please turn off your CAPS LOCK? It makes your postings very hard to read.

Thank you.

-- Jun

Please help support AikiWeb -- become an AikiWeb Contributing Member!
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2003, 04:49 AM   #18
Shrike
 
Shrike's Avatar
Dojo: Budoviikingit, Vuosaari http://www.budoviikingit.org/
Location: Kallio, Helsinki, Finland
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 9
Offline
One thing that i forgot to mention is that the club i train aikido at also has Iaido and Tauramusoryu Kobujutsu (and i don't have to pay extra to train the other two styles . My Sensei teaches all three styles and as such i would like to think that they support each other to some extent.

T. kobujutsu is 60% Jo techniques and 40% other old weapon techniques (Bokken, Bo etc).

What i like about it the most is that there are a lot of warming up that also strengthens the muscles you use with weapons.

Cheers.

- Shrike -
"It's Just A Ride" -Bill Hicks
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2003, 05:43 AM   #19
Kung Fu Liane
Location: Jersey
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 64
Offline
Confused

I think any style of martial art can help with aikido training.

i started studying kung fu and tai chi before aikido, and although i had some problems to overcome (changing stances, posture, learning to ukemi, being a complete beginner again etc), i stuck with the training. now i can put what i've learnt through aikido into my chinese styles.

every style has its downfall, so learning more than one style is always a good idea, especially if the styles compliment each other. this is not to say you should try and study every martial art under the sun, that would be impossible, but 2 or 3 is great if you have the time

-Liane

Aikido: a martial art which allows you to defeat your enemy without hurting him, unless of course he doesn't know how to breakfall in which case he will shatter every bone in his body when he lands. Also known as Origami with people
  Reply With Quote

Please visit our sponsor:

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!



Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:39 AM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2017 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2017 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate