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Old 12-08-2002, 09:14 AM   #26
Bruce Baker
Dojo: LBI Aikikai/LBI ,NJ
Location: Barnegaat, NJ
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 893
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Are you Guys and Girls paying attention?

You will need to learn how to advance your awareness, your ability to intercept movements to correctly use Aikido!

Blending with movement is not always at the end of movements, but many times, in the midst of movements.

This little forray of interluding to catching punches is but an introduction to learning some of the basic principles to Aikido.

It is not always a case of boxing, but a case of being able to see the movements in a slower state of movement so you can react!

You ain't gonna get this by discussing what would happen if a kickboxer did this, or a boxer did that.

Get serious.

Learn the training methods to slow these movements down and speed up your own reflexes.

Just what do you think all those drills of boxxing and kickboxers are for?

Now ... apply that mind and body training to your Aikido.

Sorry to be grumpy, the slush, snow, and first real cold of winter do that to me. Nothing like stepping into six inches of slush and having it run into your shoes.

Last edited by Bruce Baker : 12-08-2002 at 09:16 AM.
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Old 12-08-2002, 11:18 AM   #27
Kensai
Location: South West UK
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 216
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A soft art does not mean gentle, its means with internal energy and possibly superior biomechanics.

Regards,

"Minimum Effort, Maximum Effciency."
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Old 12-08-2002, 12:14 PM   #28
Thalib
 
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Dojo: 合気研究会
Location: Jakarta Selatan
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Indonesia
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I used to try to grab or catch when doing techniques. But, that was then, now I don't actually "grab" or "catch" attacks. I just keep contact with the uke, a light hold or touch will do.

Grabbing or catching especially fiercefully or hard holds diminishes the possibility of feeling your uke's intentions. This actually gives uke the upper hand, the uke could easily take back the attacking appendage or just hold the posistion - blocking any techniques.

I don't believe in catching or grabbing, I believe in "musubi".

When I have to die by the sword, I will do so with honor.
--------
http://funkybuddha.multiply.com/
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Old 12-08-2002, 10:00 PM   #29
Bruce Baker
Dojo: LBI Aikikai/LBI ,NJ
Location: Barnegaat, NJ
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Maybe we should go back to trying to do Aikido with boxing gloves on so no one can grab?

There will be no punching, but you must still do the entire class without being able to grab, does that help?

How about the class with all open palm or just handblades to manipulate?

Whether you intercept a movement with a handblade, or a forearm, or the open palm of your hand, it is still the goal of the Aikido practitioner to intercept and use movement to their advantage.

I guess many of you need a class where there is no grabbing, holding, or closing the fingers ... only handblade and open palm.

Does that clear the parameters of learning to use Aikido in a more efficient manner than the old schoolyard grab and shove someone?

Maybe a couple of weeks of 'sticky hands' instead of grabbing hands will cure some of this mis-nomer?
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Old 12-09-2002, 02:52 AM   #30
bob_stra
Location: Australia
Join Date: Oct 2002
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Quote:
Bruce Baker wrote:
You will need to learn how to advance your awareness, your ability to intercept movements to correctly use Aikido!

....

Learn the training methods to slow these movements down and speed up your own reflexes.

....

Just what do you think all those drills of boxxing and kickboxers are for?
I'd like to hear more of your thought on this topic. I've found that "soft work" (slow, flowing practice) has helped me move faster. Is this what you were alluding to?

Also how do you feel abt the use of boxing's evasive methods (slip / bob and weave etc) as entries into aikido techs? I can imagine slipping a jab into a wrist twist (sorry, still not up to speed with aikido Japanese terms)

Kinda of ties into the whole "movement is movement Period" theme cropping up in several different threads ;-)
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Old 12-09-2002, 03:09 AM   #31
PeterR
 
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Dojo: Shodokan Honbu (Osaka)
Location: Himeji, Japan
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Years ago when I was young and foolish I used to to Nippon Kempo (see link for picture). It was full contact but you were armoured up for protection and got to wear boxing gloves. I was sidelined with a dislocated toe and reallized I didn't miss the three day headaches after tournaments but those joint locks were really interesting. That is what got me into Aikido.

In Shodokan randori one of the rules is that you can not grab clothing.

What you are talking about Bruce is my bread and butter.

http://www.geocities.com/Tokyo/Flats/6231/
Quote:
Bruce Baker wrote:
Maybe we should go back to trying to do Aikido with boxing gloves on so no one can grab?

There will be no punching, but you must still do the entire class without being able to grab, does that help?

How about the class with all open palm or just handblades to manipulate?

Peter Rehse Shodokan Aikido
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Old 12-09-2002, 08:16 AM   #32
Sam
Dojo: Kyogikan Sheffield
Location: UK
Join Date: Jan 2001
Posts: 90
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Hi Peter,

Interesting stuff.

Here are my favourite quotes from the site:

The game lasts for three minutes and is proceeded according to the start sign of chief refree and a point will be given when :

d) A correct UCHI or KERI is made in the opponent's crotch.

PROHIBITIONS :

2) To give a strong ATEMI-WAZA to your opponent when he is on the floor.

You must be made of stern stuff!
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Old 12-09-2002, 09:22 AM   #33
PeterR
 
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Dojo: Shodokan Honbu (Osaka)
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Japan
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As I said - young and foolish.

I was never any good at it. Always felt a need to appologize after I hit someone.

By the way I heard the club is still there, I assume in the School of Oriental and African Studies basement in London where I trained almost 20 years ago. Haven't been back since I left.
Quote:
Sam Benson (Sam) wrote:
Hi Peter,

Interesting stuff.

Here are my favourite quotes from the site:

The game lasts for three minutes and is proceeded according to the start sign of chief refree and a point will be given when :

d) A correct UCHI or KERI is made in the opponent's crotch.

PROHIBITIONS :

2) To give a strong ATEMI-WAZA to your opponent when he is on the floor.

You must be made of stern stuff!

Peter Rehse Shodokan Aikido
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Old 12-09-2002, 04:56 PM   #34
L. Camejo
 
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Dojo: Ontario Martial Arts
Location: Mississauga, Ontario
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Canada
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As far as catching punches go, this seemed to be an exercise in futility. Especially with beginners to tanto randori (tanto tsuki similar to straight punch). They would often find that their fingers would be cut by the tanto if they were practicing against a live blade.

Basically, my approach is to utilise tegatana as a point of contact on uke's forearm, after avoidance. I can pretty much feel wherever the limb goes from there as long as I stay relaxed (returning to tegatana awase basic practice). This allows the ability to control the arm/attack as well as guide it to where you want to apply kuzushi, atemi waza or whatever technique seems suitable.

Just my 2 cents.

L.C.

Last edited by L. Camejo : 12-09-2002 at 04:59 PM.

--Mushin Mugamae - No Mind No Posture. He who is possessed by nothing possesses everything.--
http://www.tntaikido.org
http://www.mushinkan.ca
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