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Old 05-04-2016, 11:28 AM   #1
Peter Boylan
Join Date: Aug 2001
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Feeding The Budo Mind

Budo isn't just the dry practice of techniques. There is history, philosophy, ethics, etiquette, psychology and more. It's a means of growing the body and mind. Practice feeds the body, but how do you feed your budo mind? My budo blog this week is about that.

http://budobum.blogspot.com/2016/05/...budo-mind.html

Peter Boylan
Mugendo Budogu LLC
Budo Books, Videos, Equipment from Japan
http://www.budogu.com
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Old 05-05-2016, 08:56 AM   #2
lbb
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Re: Feeding The Budo Mind

Quote:
Peter Boylan wrote: View Post
One of my favorites is also among the shortest. The Tao Te Ching. Said to have been written by a legendary record-keeper of the Zhou Dynasty in China in the 6th century BC, it is the foundational text for Taoist thought. Why is this important? Even though it only runs to about 2,500 Chinese characters (it's shorter than most of my blog posts!), it carries the essential ideas about strategy, power, value, ethics, responsibility and leadership. The idea of the Way heavily influence Confucian and Buddhist thought in China, both as something worth considering and as something to reject. It has been translated more than any book except the Christian Bible. There is no definitive translation because the nature of the work allows for many subtle interpretations, none of which are wrong. My current favorite English translation is Gai-Fu Feng's. Unfortunately, it seems to be out of print again.
Ursula Le Guin has an annotated "rendition" (not a translation, she points out) that I quite like. If you read her afterword, she took an interesting approach to comparing different translations, including Gai-Fu Feng's.
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Old 05-06-2016, 07:10 AM   #3
Peter Boylan
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Re: Feeding The Budo Mind

Quote:
Mary Malmros wrote: View Post
Ursula Le Guin has an annotated "rendition" (not a translation, she points out) that I quite like. If you read her afterword, she took an interesting approach to comparing different translations, including Gai-Fu Feng's.
Mary, you might find this site interesting. It's got a couple of English translations, as well as the Chinese with annotations. I find it fascinating what has to be done transform it into English.
http://wengu.tartarie.com/wg/wengu.php?l=Daodejing

Peter Boylan
Mugendo Budogu LLC
Budo Books, Videos, Equipment from Japan
http://www.budogu.com
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Old 05-06-2016, 07:44 AM   #4
Peter Goldsbury
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Dojo: Hiroshima Kokusai Dojo
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Re: Feeding The Budo Mind

Quote:
Peter Boylan wrote: View Post
Mary, you might find this site interesting. It's got a couple of English translations, as well as the Chinese with annotations. I find it fascinating what has to be done transform it into English.
http://wengu.tartarie.com/wg/wengu.php?l=Daodejing
Hello Peter,

Yes, your link is a good resource. There are similar resources for studying the Presocratics, like Heraclitus and Parmenides, both of whom wrote in poetry. With aikido, on the other hand, you need to look at Onisaburo Deguchi, including how he interpreted the texts like the Kojiki. I recently received a typewritten manuscript dealing with some of the discourses that Morihei Ueshiba produced--including all the mistakes that had been made in transmission. It is unfortunate that Deguchi has not been translated from Japanese.

Best wishes,

PAG

P A Goldsbury
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