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Old 07-09-2012, 10:19 AM   #1
mathewjgano
 
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Free Solo Climbing

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SR1jw...ature=youtu.be

Pretty amazing...and an excellent example of a controlled mind. I like what he describes when asked about whether he feels adrenaline.
There are a number of interesting things I got from this video.
Enjoy.

Last edited by mathewjgano : 07-09-2012 at 10:22 AM.

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Old 07-09-2012, 12:05 PM   #2
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Re: Free Solo Climbing

Anytime I see guys like these I am amazed by one thing in particular. Where is their water?!?
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Old 07-09-2012, 06:44 PM   #3
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Re: Free Solo Climbing

lol, hundreds of feet above them! Incentive perhaps?

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Old 07-10-2012, 10:41 AM   #4
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Re: Free Solo Climbing

While I can admire the physical and mental discipline he has to do Free Solo Climbing, I question his judgement on continuing an activity where the death rate is around 50%.

dps
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Old 07-10-2012, 12:10 PM   #5
Basia Halliop
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Re: Free Solo Climbing

"While I can admire the physical and mental discipline he has to do Free Solo Climbing, I question his judgement on continuing an activity where the death rate is around 50%."

Yes. The actual physical feat could be done (and most likely has been done many times) with safety ropes in place, but with slack in the ropes so they are never used. Which, by the way, can take a lot of mental control too because there are times when it's soooo tempting to use the ropes.

This is just danger for the sake of danger.

If he craves danger, why not do something actually useful like be a firefighter or an aid worker in a war zone? This just seems like pointless risk of life.
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Old 07-10-2012, 12:46 PM   #6
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Re: Free Solo Climbing

Quote:
Basia Halliop wrote: View Post
"While I can admire the physical and mental discipline he has to do Free Solo Climbing, I question his judgement on continuing an activity where the death rate is around 50%."

Yes. The actual physical feat could be done (and most likely has been done many times) with safety ropes in place, but with slack in the ropes so they are never used. Which, by the way, can take a lot of mental control too because there are times when it's soooo tempting to use the ropes.

This is just danger for the sake of danger.

If he craves danger, why not do something actually useful like be a firefighter or an aid worker in a war zone? This just seems like pointless risk of life.
Well put. It's not a risk I would ever take. "Stuff happens" is my motto. It's astounding to me, and I am in awe of his skill and confidence, but no matter how good I am at something, I would try to account for that unknown x-factor.

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Old 07-10-2012, 02:07 PM   #7
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Re: Free Solo Climbing

Last summer I attempted to summit Bell Rock in Arizona, which is nothing compared to something like "El Cap", although it's still challenging and dangerous. I made it close to the top, but I became nauseated even thinking about trying to make it the rest of the way. Quite simply, it was just too risky. I rested there and drank some water and eventually a shirtless hiker appeared, sweating profusely. He didn't really say anything because he was so in the zone, and he was now at the part where his life was truly at risk if he made one misstep. I watched as he tentatively made his way onward, exploring the various summit routes which all looked impossible from my vantage point. Slowly, and need I say CAREFULLY, he eventually made it to the peak. Again, this was summer and he was topless and without water and sweating heavily.

I didn't get the chance to meetup with him at the bottom, but I wanted nothing more than to shake that man's hand. I'm sure to him, summiting mountains like that without water or regard for his LIFE was just a typical Saturday. But for me it was an amazing feat. One worthy of admiration and story telling.

Last edited by genin : 07-10-2012 at 02:17 PM.
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Old 07-14-2012, 04:15 PM   #8
Anthony Loeppert
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Re: Free Solo Climbing

Quote:
Matthew Gano wrote: View Post
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SR1jw...ature=youtu.be

Pretty amazing...and an excellent example of a controlled mind. I like what he describes when asked about whether he feels adrenaline.
There are a number of interesting things I got from this video.
Enjoy.
Oh my... that scares the crap out of me. I have a moderate (healthy?) fear of heights - airplanes are no issue but you won't find me in a hot air balloon or on the side of a shear cliff.

But that guy has transformed himself into something else - via his environment of climbing walls - as his hands have adapted to the task.

I played cello for many years, though I have not picked up the instrument in a LONG time, and the tips of my fingers on my left hand are still bigger than my right due to how the instrument is played. That guy's hands were conditioned for the task of climbing in a way I never thought possible.

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Anthony
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Old 07-21-2012, 02:48 PM   #9
Basia Halliop
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Re: Free Solo Climbing

It's not mostly in the hands... of course they matter, especially for small grips, but it's more about learning which way to shift your weight, where to push and where to pull, which way to balance, etc. I climb but not that advanced and never solo...
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Old 07-23-2012, 12:11 PM   #10
Basia Halliop
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Re: Free Solo Climbing

Quote:
I didn't get the chance to meetup with him at the bottom, but I wanted nothing more than to shake that man's hand. I'm sure to him, summiting mountains like that without water or regard for his LIFE was just a typical Saturday. But for me it was an amazing feat. One worthy of admiration and story telling.
Story telling, yeah, but I why admiration? I don't get that. What's admirable about acting without regard for your life? Isn't that just basically saying that human life is meaningless and that you don't value the amazing gift you've been given by being able to be alive and healthy when so many others aren't? There are people in the world who would do almost anything for the health the hiker in your story has, and he's willing to risk throwing it away for some bragging rights or because he couldn't be bothered to carry a water bottle. It's insulting to those people.

It's got nothing in common with someone taking risks out of respect for someone else's life (burning building + child trapped inside, etc). Here there's no greater goal to gain. What's gained is so minor that if that goal is worth risking life for, it just says life is meaningless. Which is depressing.

Last edited by Basia Halliop : 07-23-2012 at 12:22 PM.
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Old 07-23-2012, 12:21 PM   #11
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Re: Free Solo Climbing

Of course it's his own life so his own choice and he must live his life according to his own beliefs and not mine... but I see no reason for anyone else to admire it, even if I can respect it in the basic way I can respect anyone else's desire to live their own life their own way.
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Old 07-23-2012, 01:36 PM   #12
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Re: Free Solo Climbing

Quote:
Basia Halliop wrote: View Post
Story telling, yeah, but I why admiration? I don't get that. What's admirable about acting without regard for your life? Isn't that just basically saying that human life is meaningless and that you don't value the amazing gift you've been given by being able to be alive and healthy when so many others aren't? There are people in the world who would do almost anything for the health the hiker in your story has, and he's willing to risk throwing it away for some bragging rights or because he couldn't be bothered to carry a water bottle. It's insulting to those people.

It's got nothing in common with someone taking risks out of respect for someone else's life (burning building + child trapped inside, etc). Here there's no greater goal to gain. What's gained is so minor that if that goal is worth risking life for, it just says life is meaningless. Which is depressing.
I respect balls, plain and simple. Especially when you demonstrate that you are not just a wild idiot, but are able to summon inner courage and strength in the face of danger and overcome an obstacle. You are exactly right in that he has something many others don't, and would love to have, yet he risks it all for seemingly nothing. Who knows if he is after bragging rights, he may not be. Perhaps it is that individual's way of enjoying his life to the fullest, even in the face of possible death. It's what makes him feel alive. Those others who could never do this, myself included, envy what he is able to do.

I would also say that risking your life to save children from a burning building is no longer admirable once you go around saying "Hey everyone, I save kids from burning buildings! Aren't I admirable?!" If you do that, and expect nothing in return, then it's highly admirable. If you do it for bragging rights, you lose all respect (from me anyways).
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Old 07-24-2012, 07:22 AM   #13
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Re: Free Solo Climbing

Quote:
Basia Halliop wrote: View Post
Story telling, yeah, but I why admiration? I don't get that. What's admirable about acting without regard for your life? Isn't that just basically saying that human life is meaningless and that you don't value the amazing gift you've been given by being able to be alive and healthy when so many others aren't?
Basia, isn't it possible that you're guessing at what such actions would mean to you, and concluding that they must therefore mean the same thing to this climber? Seems like flawed reasoning to me.

Quote:
Basia Halliop wrote: View Post
There are people in the world who would do almost anything for the health the hiker in your story has, and he's willing to risk throwing it away for some bragging rights or because he couldn't be bothered to carry a water bottle. It's insulting to those people.
No, it isn't. It's not about those people. He can't gift those people with his good health; he can't somehow save them by keeping his feet on the ground, and he's not doing what he's doing to somehow spite them. And you think it's about "some bragging rights", but you don't really know, do you? The interviewer tried at times to bait him with the standard cliches about "adrenaline"; he shut that down pretty thoroughly, I thought.

Quote:
Basia Halliop wrote: View Post
It's got nothing in common with someone taking risks out of respect for someone else's life (burning building + child trapped inside, etc). Here there's no greater goal to gain. What's gained is so minor that if that goal is worth risking life for, it just says life is meaningless. Which is depressing.
So, it's only self-sacrificing altruism that can serve a "greater goal"? By that yardstick, a great many people are "say[ing] life is meaningless" -- artists, musicians, dedicated martial artists, all kinds of people engaged in singleminded pursuits that are not literally or metaphorically saving children trapped in burning buildings. Now that's depressing.
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Old 07-24-2012, 12:01 PM   #14
Basia Halliop
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Re: Free Solo Climbing

Oh, of course, I'm speculating and projecting all over the place. Just trying to explain why admiration for someone who intentionally goes hiking on a hot day without water is a reaction that I can't fathom. I don't see the bravery in that, just apparent stupidity (note I said apparent). That was the story those comments were in response to - at least in the initial free climbing video I can see there's a hugely intense thrill, which for some people might be rewarding enough to be worth it, though not personally for me.

Last edited by Basia Halliop : 07-24-2012 at 12:07 PM.
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Old 07-24-2012, 12:03 PM   #15
Basia Halliop
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Re: Free Solo Climbing

Quote:
No, it isn't. It's not about those people. He can't gift those people with his good health; he can't somehow save them by keeping his feet on the ground, and he's not doing what he's doing to somehow spite them. And you think it's about "some bragging rights", but you don't really know, do you? The interviewer tried at times to bait him with the standard cliches about "adrenaline"; he shut that down pretty thoroughly, I thought.
I wasn't talking about him, I was talking about Roger Flatley's anecdote about a guy climbing a mountain on a hot day without water.
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Old 07-24-2012, 12:06 PM   #16
Basia Halliop
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Re: Free Solo Climbing

Quote:
artists, musicians, dedicated martial artists, all kinds of people engaged in singleminded pursuits that are not literally or metaphorically saving children trapped in burning buildings.
I don't really see the parallel, since those people aren't risking their life to any extreme extent to accomplish those things. My point was that to me, an extreme risk to life needs an extreme justification.

I just don't see anything amazing or awesome or inspiring about someone doing something extremely dangerous just for sake of doing something extremely dangerous. It's their life, and that's fine, and presumably there's something about the experience they're getting out of it, and if they're decent people and not hurting anyone then there's nothing to particularly look down on them for either, but I don't admire it.

Last edited by Basia Halliop : 07-24-2012 at 12:12 PM.
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Old 07-24-2012, 12:10 PM   #17
Basia Halliop
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Re: Free Solo Climbing

Quote:
I would also say that risking your life to save children from a burning building is no longer admirable once you go around saying "Hey everyone, I save kids from burning buildings! Aren't I admirable?!"
Sure, agree with that and it doesn't mean the person would necessarily be a great person. Although OTOH the kid is alive regardless of the motivations.
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Old 07-24-2012, 02:06 PM   #18
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Re: Free Solo Climbing

Quote:
Basia Halliop wrote: View Post
I don't really see the parallel, since those people aren't risking their life to any extreme extent to accomplish those things. My point was that to me, an extreme risk to life needs an extreme justification.
I guess it's all in what you would call "extreme". People have devoted themselves to their various passions in all kinds of ways that normal people call "extreme", and while it's not immediately life-threatening, you can certainly argue that the life of a starving artist doesn't improve one's well-being, and can be plenty detrimental to those around them.

There are also many examples of people who acted against medical advice (for example, refusing certain kinds of treatment). This ranges from people refusing a straightforward treatment for a condition that ends up killing you, to people who are dying anyway refusing further treatment. At both extremes, and everywhere in between, there are other people who are firmly convinced that the person is making the wrong choice. Sometimes it's pretty cut and dried, but a lot of the time it seems to me like it's in the eye of the beholder, with no obvious right choice.

Quote:
Basia Halliop wrote: View Post
I just don't see anything amazing or awesome or inspiring about someone doing something extremely dangerous just for sake of doing something extremely dangerous.
Well, see, that is where you may be mistaken (in the assumption that the only reason they're doing it is because it's extremely dangerous. As much as that element looms large to a casual observer, it may be incidental to the person doing it. It's not why you do it, it's not why you don't do it...it's just there.

Quote:
Basia Halliop wrote: View Post
It's their life, and that's fine, and presumably there's something about the experience they're getting out of it
...and right there you've admitted to the possibility that there may be more to it than "just for the sake of doing something extremely dangerous". See what I mean?
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Old 07-24-2012, 02:28 PM   #19
Basia Halliop
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Re: Free Solo Climbing

Quote:
...and right there you've admitted to the possibility that there may be more to it than "just for the sake of doing something extremely dangerous". See what I mean?
Yes, that's true. Although what I was thinking when I wrote that was that for some people 'doing something extremely dangerous' might in and of itself feel like enough reason. E.g., some people like to feel fear. For other people it may be that they're doing something despite the danger rather than actually because of it. If they're adults, know the risks of what they're doing, and don't have young children, as far as I'm concerned they can do whatever they want and I'll be perplexed but can shrug and live and let live.
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Old 07-24-2012, 08:22 PM   #20
phitruong
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Re: Free Solo Climbing

there were folks who looked at the moon and said "nice", "beautiful", ...etc. and there were folks who said "we will put man on the moon someday." and they did by strap man "on four million pounds of fuel, .... and a thing that has 270,000 moving parts built by the lowest bidder"

there are few who can show the rest of us what we human are capable of.

Last edited by phitruong : 07-24-2012 at 08:24 PM.

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Old 07-25-2012, 08:26 AM   #21
genin
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Re: Free Solo Climbing

Quote:
Phi Truong wrote: View Post
there were folks who looked at the moon and said "nice", "beautiful", ...etc. and there were folks who said "we will put man on the moon someday." and they did by strap man "on four million pounds of fuel, .... and a thing that has 270,000 moving parts built by the lowest bidder"

there are few who can show the rest of us what we human are capable of.
On the flipside of that coin, the billions of dollars spent on moon missions did little to benefit anyone, aside from those employed to accomplish that mission--all at the expense of taxpayers of course. Meanwhile, poverty within American inner cities rages on, with precious money that would've otherwise been used for social programs or subsidies to assist those less fortunate literally going "up in smoke" (polluting our air as well!) I, for one, am completely unimpressed by the capabilities of humanity, at least in this respect.
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Old 07-25-2012, 10:05 AM   #22
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Re: Free Solo Climbing

Quote:
Roger Flatley wrote: View Post
On the flipside of that coin, the billions of dollars spent on moon missions did little to benefit anyone, aside from those employed to accomplish that mission--all at the expense of taxpayers of course. Meanwhile, poverty within American inner cities rages on, with precious money that would've otherwise been used for social programs or subsidies to assist those less fortunate literally going "up in smoke" (polluting our air as well!) I, for one, am completely unimpressed by the capabilities of humanity, at least in this respect.
there will always be poverty, poor, inequity, and various society ills and etc and etc. can't speak for other folks, but years ago when i lived in a back ass third world country, working in the rice paddy, living with no indoor plumbing, no electricity, and close to starvation, i often looked up the moon and dreamed of being an astronaut. so i studied math and science by the oil lamp and went into science/engineering field and a star trek fan. inspiration gives you hope. hope gives you drive. drive takes you places.

"budo is putting on cold, wet, sweat stained gi with a smile and a snarl" - your truly
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Old 07-25-2012, 11:49 AM   #23
dps
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Re: Free Solo Climbing

Quote:
Roger Flatley wrote: View Post
On the flipside of that coin, the billions of dollars spent on moon missions did little to benefit anyone, aside from those employed to accomplish that mission--all at the expense of taxpayers of course..
This is not true.

The research and development stemming from NASA has improved our lives in the fields of medicine, food production, transportation, communications and more.

It took me less then 20 seconds to find this information,

http://spinoff.nasa.gov/Spinoff2008/tech_benefits.html

Don't be lazy, do some research before you post.
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Old 07-25-2012, 12:25 PM   #24
genin
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Re: Free Solo Climbing

Quote:
David Skaggs wrote: View Post
This is not true.

The research and development stemming from NASA has improved our lives in the fields of medicine, food production, transportation, communications and more.

It took me less then 20 seconds to find this information,

http://spinoff.nasa.gov/Spinoff2008/tech_benefits.html

Don't be lazy, do some research before you post.
Lolz, not really. Not one of those "improvements" was a result of moon missions. In fact, many of them could've been created in a zero G environment here on earth. The folks at NASA have a vested interest in making it seem like their work is indispensable, just like the factory worker who doesn't want to be replaced by a robot. It's all about money.

There was a joke made on a Simpsons episode where they were planning a shuttle mission focusing on the effects of zero G's on tiny screws, which would have profound benefits ranging from "watch making to watch repair". A tongue and cheek joke pointing out the limited nature of any benefits space exploration can produce (based on our current level of technology).

Maybe if the cost was not an issue, I'd say go for it. But the cost and risks are just too high. Heck, even NASA agrees with this which is why they shut down their shuttle program.

20 seconds, eh? It shows.
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Old 07-26-2012, 12:19 AM   #25
dps
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Re: Free Solo Climbing

Quote:
Roger Flatley wrote: View Post

There was a joke made on a Simpsons episode where they were planning a shuttle mission focusing on the effects of zero G's on tiny screws, which would have profound benefits ranging from "watch making to watch repair". A tongue and cheek joke pointing out the limited nature of any benefits space exploration can produce (based on our current level of technology).
.
ROFLMAO!

Using the Simpsons as a reference to support your statement, eh? It shows.

dps
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