Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > Weapons

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-12-2012, 08:44 AM   #1
lars beyer
Dojo: Copenhagen Aikishuren Dojo
Location: Denmark
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 272
Denmark
Offline
Weapons in Aikido

Hi ladies and gentlemen.

I practise Aikido with a big emphasis on Aikiken and Aikijo.
Personally I love it and it makes a lot of sence to me in relation to Aikido.
What are your experiences with Aikido and Weapons ?
Do you like it ? Does it enhance your training or do you feel it is not relevant to Aikido ?

Peace
Lars

PS
Maybe there is allready an old thread on the subject.. so please excuse me..
I just think it is an interresting subject.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2012, 04:21 PM   #2
ryback
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 198
Offline
Re: Weapons in Aikido

Well,the way i see it one should not choose weapons or no weapons,this or that.The roots of aikido techniques go back to the days of the samurai,when the weapons were used in every combat situation.So aikiken,aikijo are along with the unarmed techniques and every possible combination,a part of aikido.The weapons teach us,among other things,posture,distance and the basic principles behind the techniques.So there is no dilema.I think that one cannot learn aikido trully without weapons practice!
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2012, 06:09 PM   #3
Travis Johnson
Dojo: Nippon Kan Aikido, Denver, CO
Location: Norwood, Colorado
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 13
United_States
Offline
Re: Weapons in Aikido

I totally agree with the above! weapons practice has been an essential part of my aikido study, probably almost 50% of it. I also find that working with weapons is very useful when training alone!
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2012, 07:44 AM   #4
phitruong
Dojo: Charlotte Aikikai Agatsu Dojo
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 1,778
United_States
Offline
Re: Weapons in Aikido

love it. hate it. ok with it. on occasion, sleep with it in order to defend myself against vicious invaders, who sneaked into my bedroom, and screamed this horrible noise on Saturday morning, "Dad, we are hungry. Make us some breakfast!"

"budo is putting on cold, wet, sweat stained gi with a smile and a snarl" - your truly
http://charlotteaikikai.org
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2012, 01:24 PM   #5
OwlMatt
 
OwlMatt's Avatar
Dojo: Milwaukee Aikikai
Location: Wisconsin
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 401
United_States
Offline
Re: Weapons in Aikido

I hear a lot about how weapons training is important for learning the fundamentals of aikido, but I've yet to train with an instructor who satisfactorily explains why or how.

  Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2012, 02:05 PM   #6
JJF
 
JJF's Avatar
Dojo: Vestfyn Aikikai Denmark
Location: Vissenbjerg
Join Date: Jul 2000
Posts: 780
Denmark
Offline
Re: Weapons in Aikido

Matthew: Come to Denmark during easter.. Six days seminar with Arisou Sensei and about 140 aikido ka from several contries I'll introduce you to some chaps that might be able to show you our take on the connection.

- Jørgen Jakob Friis

Inspiration - Aspiration - Perspiration
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2012, 03:09 PM   #7
lars beyer
Dojo: Copenhagen Aikishuren Dojo
Location: Denmark
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 272
Denmark
Offline
Re: Weapons in Aikido

Quote:
Matthew Story wrote: View Post
I hear a lot about how weapons training is important for learning the fundamentals of aikido, but I've yet to train with an instructor who satisfactorily explains why or how.
Hi Mathew,

You have some very prominent Aikido senseis and shihans in your home country who knows traditional aikido weapons extremely well. Like Pat Hendricks, Bill Witt, Hans Goto, David Alexander, Stephanie Yap, Miles Kessler, Mark Larson,Vincent Salvatore and many more. If they canīt explain that to you.. well.. I guess nobody can.

Peace
Lars
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2012, 04:16 PM   #8
Janet Rosen
  AikiWeb Forums Contributing Member
 
Janet Rosen's Avatar
Location: Left Coast
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 3,933
Offline
Re: Weapons in Aikido

Quote:
Matthew Story wrote: View Post
I hear a lot about how weapons training is important for learning the fundamentals of aikido, but I've yet to train with an instructor who satisfactorily explains why or how.
From the website:
"The Milwaukee Aikido Club, Inc., is a member of the Aikido Schools of Ueshiba and is associated with Mitsugi Saotome, Shihan, and Hiroshi Ikeda, Shihan."

Um....I am not a member of an ASU dojo but from what I know of them I believe the link between weapons and empty hand should be available if not at your dojo than certainly at many weapons seminars offered within the ASU.

Last edited by Janet Rosen : 03-13-2012 at 04:16 PM. Reason: formatting

Janet Rosen
http://www.zanshinart.com
"peace will enter when hate is gone"--percy mayfield
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2012, 04:58 PM   #9
Gerardo Torres
Location: SF Bay Area
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 190
United_States
Offline
Re: Weapons in Aikido

Quote:
Matthew Story wrote: View Post
I hear a lot about how weapons training is important for learning the fundamentals of aikido, but I've yet to train with an instructor who satisfactorily explains why or how.
I've trained with teachers who successfully teach aiki-weapons in relation to empty-hand technique: a) from a technical perspective, as in this empty-hand technique or this footwork can be mirrored with the bokken, etc., and/or b) by explaining issues of timing, centerline, tegatana, mental "connection", etc.

The perception of the usefulness of aiki-weapons as practiced today will depend on your definition of "fundamentals of aikido". The way I see it and circular logic notwithstanding, I still don't understand what makes any of the prominent aiki-weapons work out there "aiki". That said, I don't do aiki-weapons as I think a lot of that training is counter-productive to my work on aikido fundamentals as I understand them.

And don't get me wrong, I like and do (cross-train) weapons. Weirdly enough, the "outside" weapons work I've done have helped my aikido far more than any aiki-weapons I've been exposed to. I've also seen this phenomenon on friends who cross-train in classical Japanese and FMA weapon systems.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2012, 05:00 PM   #10
lars beyer
Dojo: Copenhagen Aikishuren Dojo
Location: Denmark
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 272
Denmark
Offline
Re: Weapons in Aikido

Quote:
Matthew Story wrote: View Post
I hear a lot about how weapons training is important for learning the fundamentals of aikido, but I've yet to train with an instructor who satisfactorily explains why or how.
Hi matthew
There are many different takes on Aikido weapons since many postwar senseis outside as well as inside Japan invented their own Aikido weapons based on their individual sword practices.
If you are looking for a clear and methodical step by step Aikdo weapons practise look for students of the late Morihiro Saito Shihan.
He studied weapons with Oīsensei for 24 years on a daily basis.

Regards
Lars
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2012, 05:27 PM   #11
sakumeikan
Dojo: Sakumeikan N.E. Aikkai .Newcastle upon Tyne.
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,140
United Kingdom
Offline
Re: Weapons in Aikido

Quote:
Matthew Story wrote: View Post
I hear a lot about how weapons training is important for learning the fundamentals of aikido, but I've yet to train with an instructor who satisfactorily explains why or how.
Dear Matthew,
I suggest you try and review a copy of Sansho wherein Shibata Sensei indicates the reasons for doing weapon training.Unfortunately I do not know which issue of Sansho where the article is printed. Try looking for back nos of Sansho on line. Cheers, Joe.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2012, 05:56 PM   #12
phitruong
Dojo: Charlotte Aikikai Agatsu Dojo
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 1,778
United_States
Offline
Re: Weapons in Aikido

Quote:
Matthew Story wrote: View Post
I hear a lot about how weapons training is important for learning the fundamentals of aikido, but I've yet to train with an instructor who satisfactorily explains why or how.
no teacher can explain to your satisfactory. for me, no teacher could explain it to me, only i can do that through my own practice and searching for answers. be your own teacher and you don't need explanation.

"budo is putting on cold, wet, sweat stained gi with a smile and a snarl" - your truly
http://charlotteaikikai.org
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2012, 06:06 PM   #13
Janet Rosen
  AikiWeb Forums Contributing Member
 
Janet Rosen's Avatar
Location: Left Coast
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 3,933
Offline
Re: Weapons in Aikido

Like Gerardo, I'm a fan of koryu weapons, though by geography I'm out of that option for the foreseeable future.

Within aikido, being an aikimutt, I've done a few years of Chiba Sensei's weapons, a few years of Tohei Sensei's kata and more recently more of Saito Sensei's weapons, with a teeny bit (as in a day at a time for a total of maybe three times) of Kato Sensei's weapons.

While each has its own very distinct flavor, I find they have in common several things in terms of how they enhance empty hand technique (and here I am talking specifically about partnered practice, not solo kata) :
- increased focus because of a greater sense of potential danger ("I'm gonna hit you with a stick!")
- learning to look at the whole person, not just the weapon helps with noting small movements, weighting, etc as well as zanshin
- if you are taught, as I was, to remain outwardly impassive during weapons, you find this carries over when you want or need it to in empty hand (although I've been known to spend a lot of time smiling on the mat, training joyously :-) )
- issues like centerline, entering, claiming centerline, where your center is aimed, etc become much more obvious when the weapon is several feet longer
- so does timing, especially as in weapons we often start by taking turns doing each strike/block and then, without speeding up per se, do them in a flowing manner
- if you can enter and deal with shomen from a jo or bokken, it is a lot easier to do irimi on a shomenuchi
- for movement challenged people like me, memorizing 20 to 30 part long weapons kata makes any empty hand technique seem pretty simple in terms of "getting" the gross movements :-)

Janet Rosen
http://www.zanshinart.com
"peace will enter when hate is gone"--percy mayfield
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2012, 06:09 PM   #14
lars beyer
Dojo: Copenhagen Aikishuren Dojo
Location: Denmark
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 272
Denmark
Offline
Re: Weapons in Aikido

Quote:
Phi Truong wrote: View Post
no teacher can explain to your satisfactory. for me, no teacher could explain it to me, only i can do that through my own practice and searching for answers. be your own teacher and you don't need explanation.
Hi Phi
I disagree. A good teacher can give you exactly what you need to move on. Thats the whole point of a teacher student relationship.

Peace
Lars
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2012, 06:21 PM   #15
phitruong
Dojo: Charlotte Aikikai Agatsu Dojo
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 1,778
United_States
Offline
Re: Weapons in Aikido

Quote:
Lars Beyer wrote: View Post
Hi Phi
I disagree. A good teacher can give you exactly what you need to move on. Thats the whole point of a teacher student relationship.

Peace
Lars
perhaps that's for you. for me, as i see it, until your practice reached a certain level, no explanation is satisfactory. and when your practice reached a certain level, no explanation is necessary. analogy of mathematics, if a person has problem doing multiplication, then no amount of explanation on algebra will make sense.

"budo is putting on cold, wet, sweat stained gi with a smile and a snarl" - your truly
http://charlotteaikikai.org
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2012, 06:33 PM   #16
Gerardo Torres
Location: SF Bay Area
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 190
United_States
Offline
Re: Weapons in Aikido

Quote:
Lars Beyer wrote: View Post
Hi Phi
I disagree. A good teacher can give you exactly what you need to move on. Thats the whole point of a teacher student relationship.

Peace
Lars
I see Phi's suggestion that one should "be their own teacher" as a good one, since to me it implies that one should not rely too much on any given teacher and be responsible for one's learning. In other words "own the material" rather than simply emulate or follow someone. A teacher can guide and provide good information, but the bulk of the responsibility for learning has to be held by the student IMO.

In that vein, when it came to aiki-weapons, I reached a point where I stopped and asked what my understanding of aikido and my goals were. The second step was to disregard anything that separated me from those goals, and to look for training (weapons and otherwise) that could help me achieve those goals. I had to make those decisions myself. People are often too quick to drop Sensei names and say do this or that. I would ask, why, how, for what purpose? and if possible try them out and do an objective comparison against certain goals.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2012, 07:57 PM   #17
DH
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 3,394
United_States
Offline
Re: Weapons in Aikido

I've never seen Aiki in Aikido weapon work, so I don't know what to call it other than aikido weapons.

Since it seems to match aikido movement of ___________________flavor of any group, there's really nothing to discuss ...its just a bunch of people having fun....until the mid dan and kyu ranked people start to once again " imagine" they're doing real weapons, or that what they're doing is aiki.
Dan
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2012, 05:11 AM   #18
lars beyer
Dojo: Copenhagen Aikishuren Dojo
Location: Denmark
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 272
Denmark
Offline
Re: Weapons in Aikido

Quote:
Gerardo Torres wrote: View Post
I see Phi's suggestion that one should "be their own teacher" as a good one, since to me it implies that one should not rely too much on any given teacher and be responsible for one's learning. In other words "own the material" rather than simply emulate or follow someone. A teacher can guide and provide good information, but the bulk of the responsibility for learning has to be held by the student IMO.

In that vein, when it came to aiki-weapons, I reached a point where I stopped and asked what my understanding of aikido and my goals were. The second step was to disregard anything that separated me from those goals, and to look for training (weapons and otherwise) that could help me achieve those goals. I had to make those decisions myself. People are often too quick to drop Sensei names and say do this or that. I would ask, why, how, for what purpose? his and if possible try them out and do an objective comparison against certain goals.
Hi Gerrardo,
First of all, I believe the reason must be to learn Aikido.
It goes without saying that the student have the responsability to show up in the dojo, but from there itīs the responsability of the dojo cho, the boss, to provide the prober invironment for learning- maybe even without the student realising this in the beginning.
A good teacher/ sensei will guide you and a bad one will misguide you.
By good teacher/ sensei I mean a person who is high ranking inside the traditional system, but still progressing, still evolving, still an open human being, still open for personal improvement. A person who is not lazy and absorbed in his personal achievements.

Aikido is also about letting your self go and just practise and for me personally there is no better way to do that than to put my trust 100% in my teacher and my teachers teacher and my teachers teachers teacher.
My goal is not to invent my own aikido, or to "own the material" like you say, but to train myself in this wonderfull Martial Art.
I think the idea of re- inventing Aikido and make it my personal "thing" is absolutely irrelevant for the teaching and the learning.

I had a teacher/ sensei once who said that itīs up to the student to internalise the aikido by himself, make it his own personal expression. This is a false goal I feel, even it can be obtained as a product of training but this is also irrelevant for the teaching process. Itīs a by-product.
The quality of Aikido relies 100% on the teachers and what they teach.
I believe itīs our seniors job and everybodys job to try to set the bar a little higher.
I have experience in teaching and I feel the above is true for all teaching.
I also know from personal experience that if the things you teach are not based on a solid tradition
they become superficial because learning stops when the teacher looses his foothold, that is the
tradition.

I will allways say to beginners in Aikido that they should look for the lineages that have a close and longlasting direct personal connection with Oīsensei and there is plenty of historical material available to investigate who your sensei is, and what is his lineage.
I like this quote from Oīsensei: "Dress Aikido in fresh garments but build on the old styles."
I understand the "old styles" as being the traditional styles.

I have often come to a point in my training asking myself if the things I practise collides with my personal beliefs.. But my personal beliefs are just that: Personal beliefs... and as such they can be challenged and should be over and over again.

I feel this thread is wandering off topic and I am partly to blame for this and I apologise.

Peace
Lars
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2012, 05:42 AM   #19
phitruong
Dojo: Charlotte Aikikai Agatsu Dojo
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 1,778
United_States
Offline
Re: Weapons in Aikido

Quote:
Dan Harden wrote: View Post
I've never seen Aiki in Aikido weapon work, so I don't know what to call it other than aikido weapons.
you are depressing me! don't you have somewhere to go and people to throw and fish to kill?

"budo is putting on cold, wet, sweat stained gi with a smile and a snarl" - your truly
http://charlotteaikikai.org
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2012, 05:50 AM   #20
phitruong
Dojo: Charlotte Aikikai Agatsu Dojo
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 1,778
United_States
Offline
Re: Weapons in Aikido

Quote:
Lars Beyer wrote: View Post
Aikido is also about letting your self go and just practise and for me personally there is no better way to do that than to put my trust 100% in my teacher and my teachers teacher and my teachers teachers teacher.
My goal is not to invent my own aikido, or to "own the material" like you say, but to train myself in this wonderfull Martial Art.
I think the idea of re- inventing Aikido and make it my personal "thing" is absolutely irrelevant for the teaching and the learning.
Lars
if that is your goals, then that's fine. but for me, my goal is to be better than my teacher, and his and his. if i can't exceed my teacher and his and his, then i have not learned anything, but maintain status quo and eventually diminishing the arts. what i said isn't about ego, but of in search for excellence, and never satisfy. that's my budo, my way.

"budo is putting on cold, wet, sweat stained gi with a smile and a snarl" - your truly
http://charlotteaikikai.org
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2012, 06:09 AM   #21
Pauliina Lievonen
 
Pauliina Lievonen's Avatar
Dojo: Jiki Shin Kan Utrecht
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 559
Netherlands
Offline
Re: Weapons in Aikido

Lars and Phi, may I suggest that the difference in opinion you two have might have to do with how long you both have practised?

I used to think like Lars and be very content with just learning what my teacher and my teachers teacher were teaching me.

But nowadays I'm much more self-directed in my practice, my teacher (and my dojomates, and other people when I go to seminars) of course give valuable feedback, but the problems I work on are questions I come up with by myself.

I've had the same change happen in the other things I'm studying in my life, so I think to some extent it's just a natural progression in learning.

Pauliina
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2012, 06:44 AM   #22
lars beyer
Dojo: Copenhagen Aikishuren Dojo
Location: Denmark
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 272
Denmark
Offline
Re: Weapons in Aikido

Quote:
Pauliina Lievonen wrote: View Post
Lars and Phi, may I suggest that the difference in opinion you two have might have to do with how long you both have practised?

I used to think like Lars and be very content with just learning what my teacher and my teachers teacher were teaching me.

But nowadays I'm much more self-directed in my practice, my teacher (and my dojomates, and other people when I go to seminars) of course give valuable feedback, but the problems I work on are questions I come up with by myself.

I've had the same change happen in the other things I'm studying in my life, so I think to some extent it's just a natural progression in learning.

Pauliina
Hi Paulina and Phi

I agree that with time we change our focus in training, but since we are also gradually becoming more and more responsible in relation to new students, becoming rolemodels so to speak, we have to maintain a knowlegde of the beginners mind in order to progress and to understand our junior training partners.

Itīs said many times before that a beginners frame of mind is the best for learning, and nomatter how stereotype this may sound, itīs the truth.
So instead of relying on our own abilities, our own "unique" ideas, we are better off trusting our seniors and those who came before them as a foundation or general framework for our practise.
Without this framework no progression is really possible.
Offcourse we can wander off and try out different ideas, but they shouldnīt become be the basis of what we teach the beginners.

I believe in our western hemissphere we tend to rely too much on our individual personalities and personal gain when we practise.
I prefer the Japanese approach where students are not allowed to ask too many questions.. For a westener this is a huge challenge, Iīve been there, and I have to admit it changed my concepts of learning and teaching considerably, so no, I donīt think it is merely a progression of learning because even the most
advanced students fall from grace when they place too much trust in their personal achievements and as a consequence become slacking.

Peace
Lars
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2012, 03:45 PM   #23
lars beyer
Dojo: Copenhagen Aikishuren Dojo
Location: Denmark
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 272
Denmark
Offline
Re: Weapons in Aikido

Quote:
Janet Rosen wrote: View Post
Like Gerardo, I'm a fan of koryu weapons, though by geography I'm out of that option for the foreseeable future.

Within aikido, being an aikimutt, I've done a few years of Chiba Sensei's weapons, a few years of Tohei Sensei's kata and more recently more of Saito Sensei's weapons, with a teeny bit (as in a day at a time for a total of maybe three times) of Kato Sensei's weapons.

While each has its own very distinct flavor, I find they have in common several things in terms of how they enhance empty hand technique (and here I am talking specifically about partnered practice, not solo kata) :
- increased focus because of a greater sense of potential danger ("I'm gonna hit you with a stick!")
- learning to look at the whole person, not just the weapon helps with noting small movements, weighting, etc as well as zanshin
- if you are taught, as I was, to remain outwardly impassive during weapons, you find this carries over when you want or need it to in empty hand (although I've been known to spend a lot of time smiling on the mat, training joyously :-) )
- issues like centerline, entering, claiming centerline, where your center is aimed, etc become much more obvious when the weapon is several feet longer
- so does timing, especially as in weapons we often start by taking turns doing each strike/block and then, without speeding up per se, do them in a flowing manner
- if you can enter and deal with shomen from a jo or bokken, it is a lot easier to do irimi on a shomenuchi
- for movement challenged people like me, memorizing 20 to 30 part long weapons kata makes any empty hand technique seem pretty simple in terms of "getting" the gross movements :-)
Hi Janet
I have experienced much of what you describe here as well
Peace
Lars
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2012, 05:49 PM   #24
sakumeikan
Dojo: Sakumeikan N.E. Aikkai .Newcastle upon Tyne.
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,140
United Kingdom
Offline
Re: Weapons in Aikido

Quote:
Dan Harden wrote: View Post
I've never seen Aiki in Aikido weapon work, so I don't know what to call it other than aikido weapons.

Since it seems to match aikido movement of ___________________flavor of any group, there's really nothing to discuss ...its just a bunch of people having fun....until the mid dan and kyu ranked people start to once again " imagine" they're doing real weapons, or that what they're doing is aiki.
Dan
Dear Dan ,
If you have never seen or been exposed to Aikido weapons how may I ask can you know whether or not people doing weapons work are imagining they are using real weapons/ having fun or not?Neither can you state categorically they are not doing aiki. I would not presume to suggest your work is of no value or you are just having fun[your term ,not mine ] without seeing /feeling what you do.If you must be judgemental at least do some research on the subject matter. Cheers, Joe.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2012, 07:16 AM   #25
lbb
Location: Massachusetts
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 2,777
United_States
Offline
Re: Weapons in Aikido

Quote:
Joe Curran wrote: View Post
Dear Dan ,
If you have never seen or been exposed to Aikido weapons
That's not what he said. Reread what you quoted.
  Reply With Quote

Please visit our sponsor:

Aikido DVDs and Video Downloads - by George Ledyard Sensei & other great teachers from AikidoDVDS.Com



Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Correlation of Aikido and Daito-Ryu Waza John Driscoll Columns 28 08-04-2013 05:01 PM
Yoshinkai - Beyond the "Hard Style" Label Susan Dalton Columns 8 11-16-2011 06:53 AM
Transmission, Inheritance, Emulation 20 Peter Goldsbury Columns 22 10-20-2011 10:28 PM
YouTube: Golden Center Sword graham christian General 121 12-11-2010 06:37 AM
Two things. Veers General 8 04-04-2003 01:54 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:54 AM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2014 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2014 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate