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Old 03-02-2012, 11:43 AM   #101
Kevin Leavitt
 
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

Andrew, your example of irimi nage. No issues with the example. However, you say you can CHOOSE peace in the moment. Sure, that is compassion. However, it does not, IMO, demonstrate the elimination of the competitive mind. It demonstrates that nage acknowledges the situation and responds to it appropriately and chooses to be ethical somewhere on the spectrum.

However, lets back up a little. Why should nage engage at all? If he is not trying to preserve something important to him (competition) then why would he need to do anything? Why not stand there and simply accept uke's will imposed on him?

On religion: I think you are correct in your statements about most organized religions dealing in the future and on fear. However, there are religious institutions and practices that do "preach" on the concept of present mind. I do however, think you are generally correct in your take on this.

I appreciate your example of how you believe Aikido fulfills this "missing part of religion". For me, however, as a somewhat Non-religious person as would be consider by the average "religious" person, it is detached from religion and really has nothing to do with religion whatsoever. However, everyone is free to find spiritual and religious meaning where ever they find it.

I do agree that it is a requirement to be in the present in Budo as well. However, budo also is concerned about the past and future as well.

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Old 03-02-2012, 11:48 AM   #102
TheAikidoka
 
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

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Christopher Li wrote: View Post
Well, I understand what you're saying - but show me that Ueshiba said that as well.

Best,

Chris
No Chris, he said go find out for yourself.

Andy B
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Old 03-02-2012, 11:57 AM   #103
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

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Kevin Leavitt wrote: View Post
Andrew, your example of irimi nage. No issues with the example. However, you say you can CHOOSE peace in the moment. Sure, that is compassion. However, it does not, IMO, demonstrate the elimination of the competitive mind. It demonstrates that nage acknowledges the situation and responds to it appropriately and chooses to be ethical somewhere on the spectrum.

However, lets back up a little. Why should nage engage at all? If he is not trying to preserve something important to him (competition) then why would he need to do anything? Why not stand there and simply accept uke's will imposed on him?

On religion: I think you are correct in your statements about most organized religions dealing in the future and on fear. However, there are religious institutions and practices that do "preach" on the concept of present mind. I do however, think you are generally correct in your take on this.

I appreciate your example of how you believe Aikido fulfills this "missing part of religion". For me, however, as a somewhat Non-religious person as would be consider by the average "religious" person, it is detached from religion and really has nothing to do with religion whatsoever. However, everyone is free to find spiritual and religious meaning where ever they find it.

I do agree that it is a requirement to be in the present in Budo as well. However, budo also is concerned about the past and future as well.
There is no past, there is no future, this is Fact. You do not compete, by finishing the opponent in the sense he so completely injured, he may have to go to hospital, he does not get maimed, he does not die, he does not lose, so you do not lose.
yes you can do all these things damage injure maim kill disable, but once you do, there is no going back, you cannot undo what has been done, You also cannot easily undo what has happened in You. So make it as peaceful an encounter, peaceful I think is the wrong word, Kinder is more to where I`m going, but you can have full domination of the situation, but not the opponent.

Thus no competing: look what your about to do to me with that big knofe how dare you attack me in such a way. BANG trapped in competition, and if you have the skill will probably utterly destroy the opponent. There is Another way. Non-competing.

you preserve life. not go onto to commit to death, death of spirit that is you. You the peace under which all situations/moments Occur

Andy B

Last edited by TheAikidoka : 03-02-2012 at 12:01 PM. Reason: Added more text. for clarity
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Old 03-02-2012, 12:02 PM   #104
graham christian
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

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Kevin Leavitt wrote: View Post
Agreed, we are not on the same page. I accept that.

So, I ask for a clearer definition of the competitive mind. I offer the standard buddhist definition along the lines that life is suffering and desire/wants/cravings is what causes suffering....I got all that, I am a practicing buddhist BTW.

I see two distinct issues. Personal level of suffering and the manifestation of it in society or Societal.

Can you accept this as a definition of competitive mind? that is, on a personal level, that desires/wants/cravings cause suffering and the things that people do to act on them is the thing you are calling BAD...or the competitive mind?

If not, then please explain what you mean at the root level what the causes are of competitive mind so we can better understand the causations.

From there, we can then begin to discuss the various solutions on the spectrum. From mediation and other transformative processes.

And, yes, even the Dali Lama admits that sometimes violence is necessary in order to STOP violence if you take the time to listen to what he says. He understands the complex nature of things.

So, it isn't about if I agree to what your definition of budo is or isn't....it is about YOU giving examples or defining HOW your perspective provides solutions to the various problems on the spectrum.

So, again, I ask. How does the physical practice of aikido help us in alleviating suffering. How does practicing the "WAR WAY" or the "VIOLENCE of Marital Arts" help us in alleviating suffering and injustice in the world? How do we STOP Violence?

That is all that is being asked. It is a very simple question really.
Hi Kevin.
That which you point out I call bad, based on selfish, cravings etc causing suffering and that also being competitive mind yes, I accept that and that is my understanding.

So if you agree with that then we are starting on the same page, thank you for explaining.

Then you ask how does the physical practice of Aikido help us in alleviating suffering. My answer is Physical practice doesn't. Aikido is not a physical practice to me, it is a spiritual practice, a practice of applying spiritual principles in order to finally see just how real and concrete they actually are. Then we can look at life from a new view which actually gives better solutions.

The 'war way' the 'violence way' does not help alleviate suffering is the point. It and thus the competitive mind cannot alleviate suffering is the point. The point I believe O'Sensei continually stated.

Thus Aikido is the discipline and path of peace. That's my view.

Aikido and how it stops violence put as you put it as a simple question deserves thus a simple answer. No competitive mind, no violence. To stop violence takes non-resistance, compassion to gain the correct understanding, humility to act without fear or hidden agenda, center, zanshin, the spirit of loving protection, and those virtues O'Sensei talked about and demonstrated.

Such is my view.

I have too many examples in Aikido of demostrating this in action to students coming from such perspectives with such questions. Thus they find a reality, they experience this different reality, they see the potential use of this different reality and thus have a personal experience which shows their competitive attitude could not handle but yet made 'too much sense' as they tend to put it whilst laughung their socks off.

Regards.G.
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Old 03-02-2012, 12:07 PM   #105
Demetrio Cereijo
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

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Dear Demetrio,
To have any meaningful answer that you would understand (not being funny here, but its true), I suggest first read the teaching`s, to grasp an understanding for yourself, follow the links below.

...
Ok, thanks.

Quote:
Anything you wish to ask afterwards feel free by all means, but at I feel, you may not need to ask.
You're right.

Regards.

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Old 03-02-2012, 12:09 PM   #106
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

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No Chris, he said go find out for yourself.

Andy B
So anything anybody comes up with on their own is OK?

I'm asking if you, yourself, can show a connection between your beliefs and what Ueshiba said, and what that connection is.

Otherwise, it's just whatever you came up with - which is not necessarily a bad thing, but I'm asking you to be a little clearer.

Best,

Chris

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Old 03-02-2012, 12:18 PM   #107
graham christian
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

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exerpt from a speeh by the Dali Lama:

"I want to make it clear, however, that although I am deeply opposed to war, I am not advocating appeasement. It is often necessary to take a strong stand to counter unjust aggression. For instance, it is plain to all of us that the Second World War was entirely justified. It "saved civilization" from the tyranny of Nazi Germany, as Winston Churchill so aptly put it. In my view, the Korean War was also just, since it gave South Korea the chance of gradually developing democracy. But we can only judge whether or not a conflict was vindicated on moral grounds with hindsight."
To judge in retrospect such things and revert back to 'moral grounds' for me is a matter of intellect and pretty useless really. That doesn't mean don't do it for still things can be learned but unfortunately from my view the important things are not learned from such a process.

No, I prefer to look at the thing itself, war. It is the result of ignorance.

Now, knowing that we may search for a time or place where it was necessary, still knowing it is a result of ignorance rather than justifying it. Therefor to remember that it of itself is always bad, evil and can never be otherwise.

We can therefor in this wide universe come across situations where we have apparently no option but thus this shows only that we can be 'forced' into doing evil. It doesn't magically make it right or good.

So wisdom dictates that there is always a better way and so also dictates that is is up to us to become more wise. Justifying war as right or good does not lead to more wise, it actually give sthe excuse, if you won, to carry on being ignorant.

These are my views.

Regards.G.
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Old 03-02-2012, 12:29 PM   #108
Marc Abrams
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

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Andrew Bedford wrote: View Post
There is no past, there is no future, this is Fact.
This statement is actually false. Your experience of past, present & future is simply a bio-electrical (via chemical processes) occurrence that manifest as cognitive, emotional and sensory experiences. At an existential level, your present is a simultaneous experience of all temporal modalities.

Quote:
Andrew Bedford wrote: View Post
You do not compete, by finishing the opponent in the sense he so completely injured, he may have to go to hospital, he does not get maimed, he does not die, he does not lose, so you do not lose.
yes you can do all these things damage injure maim kill disable, but once you do, there is no going back, you cannot undo what has been done, You also cannot easily undo what has happened in You.
Life is not a trial run. Nothing that has occurred can be done again. In a real fight, if you try to think about what you do, you are .5 seconds behind the person doing something. Bad place to be..... You do what you do in that moment and hopefully you might later have the luxury of joy, regret, sadness, etc..

Quote:
Andrew Bedford wrote: View Post
So make it as peaceful an encounter, peaceful I think is the wrong word, Kinder is more to where I`m going, but you can have full domination of the situation, but not the opponent.

Thus no competing: look what your about to do to me with that big knofe how dare you attack me in such a way. BANG trapped in competition, and if you have the skill will probably utterly destroy the opponent. There is Another way. Non-competing.

you preserve life. not go onto to commit to death, death of spirit that is you. You the peace under which all situations/moments Occur

Andy B
All of that sounds good but rarely seems to translated into effective actions. I would suggest instead that if you can remain as calm and in control of your experiences as possible in a horrible moment, the greater likelihood of you being more effective in that moment- (eye-of-the-hurricane analogy). What you described was a function of a person thinking about the situation, placing him/herself 0.5 seconds behind potential actions. It is not the competing mind that gets the person hurt, but the person who tries to think before acting. That is a neurological/ neuropsychological reality that we cannot escape from.

Marc Abrams
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Old 03-02-2012, 12:39 PM   #109
graham christian
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

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Hindsight.

IMO, this is important. Budo gives us a chance to evaluate our actions as we do not have the luxury of hindsight when we must make a stand. Therefore, we must study violence in all it's forms in order to better understand the seriousness of our actions and to make the best informed decisions we can when the time comes for us to make those tough decisions. It may only be a split second we have to make that decision.

It is about walking tall (right) and carrying a big stick (might).
O.K. Once again I will give you an alternative view.

Budo of Aikido for me gives us a chance to study non resistance in all it's forms so that we can use these principles to handle any violence. Thus the study is not of violence but of that which ends it.

It is about walking tall and carrying the bowl of peace.

Regards.G.
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Old 03-02-2012, 12:52 PM   #110
graham christian
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

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My point of the Dali Lama posting is that even in Buddhism, the concept of defense is there. The Dali Lama recognizes the need for mitigation of violence.

So, the big question is the purpose of budo to eliminate the so-called competitive mind, or is the purpose of it to keep it in check or hold it accountable?

Another thought comes to mind. You may have a non-competitive mind and be completely enlightened and transformed...however, when you meet a competitive mind that is intent on competing with you...you are in a competition whether you recognize it or not. You may choose to NOT accept it, but the mere fact you establish a connection, relationship, or response...you are competing. Failure to recognize that means the competitive mind will impose his will on you and achieve his desired end state.

Even Ghandi in his pursuit of non-violent resistance was in competition for an ideal.

Again, right street, wrong tree on the whole focus on the competitive mind.
Once again I give an alternative viewpoint.

The Buddhist concept of defence is actually one that the competitive mind cannot grasp. O'Sensei to all intents and purposes operated from a true buddhist/shinto viewpoint. He talked about 'no attack' in Aikido and thus no defence but the competitive mind cannot and will never understand what that means. Therefor if such a person was to ever use such terms they would have a totally different meaning. Hence people didn't understand what he meant being a common thread.

The whole point of Aikido is to show how when meeting a person of competitive mind you are not in a competition and how to be so.

I am not in competition with my attacker. I do not compete with him. I help him out of his own condition and then he feels better. Aikibudo.

Regards G.
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Old 03-02-2012, 01:19 PM   #111
Demetrio Cereijo
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

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Graham Christian wrote: View Post
O'Sensei to all intents and purposes operated from a true buddhist/shinto viewpoint.
Do you mean Ueshiba operated under a honji suijaku paradigm or should I understand "true buddhist/shinto viewpoint" as something different?

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Old 03-02-2012, 01:35 PM   #112
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

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Demetrio Cereijo wrote: View Post
Do you mean Ueshiba operated under a honji suijaku paradigm or should I understand "true buddhist/shinto viewpoint" as something different?
I mean he operated from an enlightened viewpoint which he said was the true purpose of all religions. So you could say I am saying a true religious viewpoint, universal, more kannagara.

I mention buddhism and shinto from a cultural perspective and the fact he studied both.

I mention true to mean enlightened.

Regards.G.
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Old 03-02-2012, 01:53 PM   #113
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

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Graham Christian wrote: View Post
I mean he operated from an enlightened viewpoint which he said was the true purpose of all religions. So you could say I am saying a true religious viewpoint, universal, more kannagara.

I mention buddhism and shinto from a cultural perspective and the fact he studied both.

I mention true to mean enlightened.

Regards.G.
More kannagara? As in Kono Shozo's Kannagara no Michi? Another meaning maybe? Which kannagara are you referring to when you say "more kannagara"?

Last edited by Demetrio Cereijo : 03-02-2012 at 01:56 PM.

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Old 03-02-2012, 02:09 PM   #114
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

Graham, thanks for answering my questions. I do appreciate and respect you for that.

Quote:
Then you ask how does the physical practice of Aikido help us in alleviating suffering. My answer is Physical practice doesn't. Aikido is not a physical practice to me, it is a spiritual practice, a practice of applying spiritual principles in order to finally see just how real and concrete they actually are. Then we can look at life from a new view which actually gives better solutions.
I think this sums up our differences, and really based on this paragraph alone, tells me that you and I are on two different planes.

Aikido for me is physical and real as is any form of budo. The intent and courage to cause harm must be present and real if necessary. For me, it is important to be able, at least mentally to be able to stand up and STOP violence. The more skill we have, the more we can influence the outcome in a more skillfull way to include non-violent ways.

If the practice ignores this aspect and is simply an allegory for what I consider to be a bastardization of philosophy and a revisionistic practice that dismissing the importance of the physical, then you are no longer practicing budo, martial art, or aikido, but something else.

Again, I have no issue with your intentions for peace, I think we'd share the same vision and endstate, but to me, what you are practicing has nothing to do with martial arts or budo. Budo has a very specific focus in its application. It is really a shame IMO that it goes misunderstood.

So, I think at this point, I have beat this to death and there really is nothing more I can say on the subject as it is very apparent to me that we are practicing two entirely separate things.

Thanks for the discussion and debate Graham.

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Old 03-02-2012, 02:25 PM   #115
graham christian
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

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Demetrio Cereijo wrote: View Post
More kannagara? As in Kono Shozo's Kannagara no Michi? Another meaning maybe? Which kannagara are you referring to when you say "more kannagara"?
http://www.google.com/url?

If that link works I mean that view. Otherwise basically the way of the gods.

G.

Last edited by graham christian : 03-02-2012 at 02:30 PM.
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Old 03-02-2012, 02:35 PM   #116
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

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Demetrio Cereijo wrote: View Post
More kannagara? As in Kono Shozo's Kannagara no Michi? Another meaning maybe? Which kannagara are you referring to when you say "more kannagara"?
The reference can be found on google entitled shinto beliefs. From http://www.world-religions-professor...tobeliefs.html.

He puts it in a way that would be more to your liking I suspect.

G.
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Old 03-02-2012, 02:54 PM   #117
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

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Graham, thanks for answering my questions. I do appreciate and respect you for that.

I think this sums up our differences, and really based on this paragraph alone, tells me that you and I are on two different planes.

Aikido for me is physical and real as is any form of budo. The intent and courage to cause harm must be present and real if necessary. For me, it is important to be able, at least mentally to be able to stand up and STOP violence. The more skill we have, the more we can influence the outcome in a more skillfull way to include non-violent ways.

If the practice ignores this aspect and is simply an allegory for what I consider to be a bastardization of philosophy and a revisionistic practice that dismissing the importance of the physical, then you are no longer practicing budo, martial art, or aikido, but something else.

Again, I have no issue with your intentions for peace, I think we'd share the same vision and endstate, but to me, what you are practicing has nothing to do with martial arts or budo. Budo has a very specific focus in its application. It is really a shame IMO that it goes misunderstood.

So, I think at this point, I have beat this to death and there really is nothing more I can say on the subject as it is very apparent to me that we are practicing two entirely separate things.

Thanks for the discussion and debate Graham.
A pleasure doing business with you Sir. In response may I end off too with my alternative way.

Aikido for me spiritual and real as in any form of sen no budo. The intent and purpose and courage to do without harm and in fact improve the others disposition is the aim and must be present at all times. For me it is thus important to be able to stand up mentally and spiritually to stop violence which these spiritual principles do. The more we know them and practice them the more ways of ending violence we see and can put into effect.

I have no argument with your intentions towards peace. The old ways of budo did just as you say. Just as O'Sensei said too.

At which point I too have no need to carry on this discussion but thank you too for it.

Peace. G.
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Old 03-02-2012, 02:54 PM   #118
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

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Graham Christian wrote: View Post
The reference can be found on google entitled shinto beliefs. From http://www.world-religions-professor...tobeliefs.html.

He puts it in a way that would be more to your liking I suspect.

G.
It's not about what I like, it's about translating you for I'm never sure which meaning you give to the words you use.

Both a "Graham to English" and a "Graham to Japanese" dictionaries are needed to talk with you.

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Old 03-02-2012, 03:47 PM   #119
graham christian
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

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Demetrio Cereijo wrote: View Post
It's not about what I like, it's about translating you for I'm never sure which meaning you give to the words you use.

Both a "Graham to English" and a "Graham to Japanese" dictionaries are needed to talk with you.
Ha, ha. You are probably right there. But you do 'like' references to virtually all statements.

Peace.G.
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Old 03-02-2012, 08:05 PM   #120
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

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Hi Kevin.
That which you point out I call bad, based on selfish, cravings etc causing suffering and that also being competitive mind yes, I accept that and that is my understanding.

So if you agree with that then we are starting on the same page, thank you for explaining.

Then you ask how does the physical practice of Aikido help us in alleviating suffering. My answer is Physical practice doesn't. Aikido is not a physical practice to me, it is a spiritual practice, a practice of applying spiritual principles in order to finally see just how real and concrete they actually are. Then we can look at life from a new view which actually gives better solutions.

The 'war way' the 'violence way' does not help alleviate suffering is the point. It and thus the competitive mind cannot alleviate suffering is the point. The point I believe O'Sensei continually stated.

Thus Aikido is the discipline and path of peace. That's my view.

Aikido and how it stops violence put as you put it as a simple question deserves thus a simple answer. No competitive mind, no violence. To stop violence takes non-resistance, compassion to gain the correct understanding, humility to act without fear or hidden agenda, center, zanshin, the spirit of loving protection, and those virtues O'Sensei talked about and demonstrated.

Such is my view.

I have too many examples in Aikido of demostrating this in action to students coming from such perspectives with such questions. Thus they find a reality, they experience this different reality, they see the potential use of this different reality and thus have a personal experience which shows their competitive attitude could not handle but yet made 'too much sense' as they tend to put it whilst laughung their socks off.

Regards.G.
Right on Brother, right on. Fantastic response, right to the heart of what I'm talking about.

In Budo

Andy B
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Old 03-02-2012, 08:14 PM   #121
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

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Marc Abrams wrote: View Post
This statement is actually false. Your experience of past, present & future is simply a bio-electrical (via chemical processes) occurrence that manifest as cognitive, emotional and sensory experiences. At an existential level, your present is a simultaneous experience of all temporal modalities.

Life is not a trial run. Nothing that has occurred can be done again. In a real fight, if you try to think about what you do, you are .5 seconds behind the person doing something. Bad place to be..... You do what you do in that moment and hopefully you might later have the luxury of joy, regret, sadness, etc..

All of that sounds good but rarely seems to translated into effective actions. I would suggest instead that if you can remain as calm and in control of your experiences as possible in a horrible moment, the greater likelihood of you being more effective in that moment- (eye-of-the-hurricane analogy). What you described was a function of a person thinking about the situation, placing him/herself 0.5 seconds behind potential actions. It is not the competing mind that gets the person hurt, but the person who tries to think before acting. That is a neurological/ neuropsychological reality that we cannot escape from.

Marc Abrams
I ment, make it as peaceful as you possibly can. Avoid it if you can, if you cannot avoid it, then injure slightly, if you have to maim/disable, before you kill, and if you must kill, kill cleanly and swiftly ( do not let them suffer) because not one drop f life should be wasted even in death.

This I believe is what O sensei ment, then technique from no matter what style, form or indeed different martial arts, will have that same intent behind it, do as little harm as possible to control the situation in hand.

This does not say do nothing if the violence escalates, indeed to do nothing when you can, is cowardice and it is vileness to my eyes, when I think of Budo.

Ask yourself where are you at this moment, I guarantee you when you read this the answer will be.......HERE NOW. You cannot be anywhere else. Please do try and tell me I'm wrong. And Come up with a convincing argument that is not based on the thought of form, because if it, is it is based in some kind of fear of future or past. if you can theN, you are not really present at all.

Andy B

Last edited by TheAikidoka : 03-02-2012 at 08:26 PM.
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Old 03-02-2012, 08:33 PM   #122
TheAikidoka
 
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

This points to the truth,, that although O'sensei's style changed considerably over the years, his single mindedness on the way did not waver 1 inch. He mainted vigorously it was still Aikido, he also vigorously maintained it was........BUDO!!!! Everything he did was BUDO!!!

And B
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Old 03-02-2012, 09:00 PM   #123
TheAikidoka
 
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

Quote:
Kevin Leavitt wrote: View Post
Andrew, your example of irimi nage. No issues with the example. However, you say you can CHOOSE peace in the moment. Sure, that is compassion. However, it does not, IMO, demonstrate the elimination of the competitive mind. It demonstrates that nage acknowledges the situation and responds to it appropriately and chooses to be ethical somewhere on the spectrum.

However, lets back up a little. Why should nage engage at all? If he is not trying to preserve something important to him (competition) then why would he need to do anything? Why not stand there and simply accept uke's will imposed on him?

On religion: I think you are correct in your statements about most organized religions dealing in the future and on fear. However, there are religious institutions and practices that do "preach" on the concept of present mind. I do however, think you are generally correct in your take on this.

I appreciate your example of how you believe Aikido fulfills this "missing part of religion". For me, however, as a somewhat Non-religious person as would be consider by the average "religious" person, it is detached from religion and really has nothing to do with religion whatsoever. However, everyone is free to find spiritual and religious meaning where ever they find it.

I do agree that it is a requirement to be in the present in Budo as well. However, budo also is concerned about the past and future as well.
Dear Kevin (me smiling broadly)

You seem to be agreeing with quite a lot of what I have said, look a little deeper and you will see what you have said is, pretty much the same as, what I have.

You said quote:
"sure it is compassion, but it does not, IMO demonstrate how to eliminate the competitive mind"

My friend, THERE IS NO COMPETITION IN REAL TRUE COMPASSION.

Compassion Is love and there is no competing in true love is there, when you are in true love with whatever form, there is no competing, YOU ACT, YOU ARE ONE, MOVE AS ONE, AND IT IS NO EFFORT NO MATTER WHAT MOMENT OF FORM YOU ARE IN.

Aikido.
Carrier
Your spouse
Kids
Your close LOVED ones,
Your thoughts,
Your movements
Your breathing
Your attacker.


There should be no competition here, or in the majority of what we do, indeed what is most important to you, and is it all or part form of competition to you, because it's not for me AT ALL! because..............

I LOVE THEM ALL.

I am, I am Alive now, And I choose to love them all, even if they are not always nice to me, I TRULY DEEPLY LOVE THEM.

It is no effort when one love's and live something, only when fear hatred and anger reside pro dominantly, do we find these all to be troublesome and fearful of, and guilty for, do you see it is he competitive mind that drives this, the constant competition for more.

And time is included in this.

And all of this can be one, now and it can only ever be one now and in ths moment.

Because underneath it all if you take a very deep breath and hold it "NOW", just put your attention there (don't think. I have follow my breath), feel the movement, with no thought, no judgement, no mental movies/images, just feel breath.

Then you may feel the peace that you are, and always has and will be in this present moment, and you act from this stillness. Instead of he competing mind.

Yes I get, angry, annoyed even furious sometimes, But I quickly dissolve it because I become aware of the peace that I am, you are, and everyone on the planet is. an Ido that Now.

Always In Budo

Andy B

Last edited by TheAikidoka : 03-02-2012 at 09:15 PM.
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Old 03-03-2012, 01:42 AM   #124
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

what I agree with in the end state not the methods. You are failing to understand that.

The other difference seems semantical to you, but you are missing that as well. The definition of competition. The mere fact that you want to preserve anything at all, be it your life, your idealogy, your family...what ever immediately means you are in competition for something.

A noble idea to have equal and true compassion equally for all. If you truly love your enemy as much as you love your child, then there is no reason for defence. The enemy needs he lust from raping your daughter and taking your son to serve as a soldier. He needs this and true compassion or as you put it ...requires you to not put your needs or the needs of your child over his.

My friend, we are at best hypocrites in this world. We are human and we must make choices. Life is about attachment. It is not about confidence and pontificating. It is noble to what to make things the way we want them to be, but ignoring those things that make us human is pure anxiety simple ignorance and or audacity.

I understand what love is, and I have experienced pure hate as well. I have stared into the eyes of evil and corruption that is way past the ability for redemption. If you experience it, there is no room for love.

Now, we can talk about my mental state all day long about killing with compassion, or detachment from anger, and no mind etc. The things I think you are describing as being void of the competitive mind. I understand those things pretty well. They have nothing to do with competition or competitiveness.

They have everything to do with detachment or compassion.

You see it is possible to love somethings more than others. It is possible to value good over evil. Our mind is in constant competition over priorities and attachments. We need to learn to manage the hypocracies. That is what we do in budo. It is about choices and priorities...they compete.

In dealing with things that don't agree with us, that we consider wrong, unjust, and bad...we can still deal with those things compassionately and choose to use the most ethical means necessary to deal with it. To only deal with the core of the issue and not inject feeling or emotion.

I have dealt with my enemies in like real in actual combat. I engaged with him, not in anger, not in hatred, I only dealt with his actions and choices, using the force he choose to use. So, I get it and understand it crystal clear. I have stopped him from forcing his negative behavior on others, and then turned to take care of his family as if I would take care of my own, to feel their pain and suffering. It is an absolute requirement. It it human.

The fact of the matter is that in the end, we are human, the very nature of your existence means we form attachments, which makes us hypocrites at best. The difference in our opinions is that I believe budo is designed to help us deal with this hypocrisy and ignorance, to manage it and come to reconcile this at the midpoint.

Whereas you seem to believe that it is designed to transform us into a state of nirvanna. Nirvanna is a worderful concept and one I would personally like to in theory achieve. However getting there is difficult at best and relegates the human experience to something that is completely meaningless, and I think that there is something to be heavily considered in that. It is a catch 22.

So as you say, if you look deeply my friend you will see that.

I really fail to see also what studying a fighting system or at least one based on that would have anything to do with reaching a state of pure love or bliss. You can kinda skip all that if this is what you want to achieve.

I see those that do Aikido falling into three categories. First those that do this because they like it, but have not really figured out why they do it, they simply like it. Those that do it because they understand the nature and realities of budo and why we need it. Third, those that choose to ignore the realities of the world and attempt to co-opt or hijack budo to fit whatever warped paradigm they wish it to be. This third group is of danger to themselves and others as they out of intention o not, are ignorant to the realities that are around them.

I pray that the dissonance that they experience when reality meets their skewed perspective that it is not in a situation that causes them true harm. And that my friend is me showing you true love and compassion, or as you put it, the non competitive mind.

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Old 03-03-2012, 04:56 AM   #125
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Re: How to be non-competitive in a competitive world

Andrew, you associate competition with cruelty, ruthlessness, callousness and you associate non-competition with empathy, compassion, mercy. But when I look up the meanings of competition, I don't find those meanings. These are associations you choose to make to reject competition and promote non-competition. IMO this is a clear case of a Straw Man fallacy (that's why I more or less stopped following this thread, although it seemed interesting at first).
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