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Old 02-26-2011, 05:39 PM   #1
graham christian
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Three Levels of Aikido

Hi. I am about to offer a simplified view of Aikido based on the premise that it is a martial art of Harmony. It is also based on the premise that through a way based on martial jutsu Aikido uses those same techniques with subtle alterations to effect a harmonious outcome.

Level one) The first level is a level of learning how to be in harmony with yourself. Through learning how to accept and respect the opponent no matter what that opponents intention or action. This means learning how not to react and thus keep a clear mind.

The principles in Aikido are there to help with this goal. Keeping center, ma-ai, koshi, relaxed weight underside, hara, one point, Ki extended, zanshin, center line, connection, non-resistance, blending etc. etc. are the DISCIPLINES which need to be employed to this end.

Thus I am saying it's not the first thing to do in Aikido but it is the first level or goal to aim for. As you can see it would take years to be able to maintain all of those disciplines in the face of any opponent.

Level Two) The second level or goal is that of maintaining the above IN MOTION. That is from moving attacks both from one and from many. To do so whilst keeping in and adhering to the discipline of the principles.

So all the time you will be calm, relaxed, clear mind and not only in harmony with self but also in harmony with the opposing motion. Thus all the principles of harmonious motion are learned and you then have all those disciplines to adhere to. Principles of the circle, off line, eight directions, entering, leading, meeting, etc.etc.

Martial for me is thus replaced by the word discipline. Every time something goes wrong or you get stuck or even damage occurs it is down to the fact that one or more of the principles were not adhered to and thus discipline to that degree was missing. So far from being an inferior martial art it is indeed a very disciplined one with many principles to learn and follow.

Along with the types of principles mentioned then there are the techniques themselves which when understood are found to follow those same principles.

Level Three) The highest level and thus the highest goal in Aikido is contained in level three. Having learned to maintain harmony with yourself and harmony with the attacker or opponent it's now time to learn how to achieve the goal of Aikido.

This is the level of bringing about a state of harmony in your opponent. A level where by employing the learned principles your attacker becomes no longer an attacker and feels good and centered and may I say restored and wondering why he ever wanted to attack in the first place.

Thus you would be having fun and to you there would be no enemies only lost souls or students if you will asking for your help.

From this viewpoint therefore the aim is not to harm, not to resist, not to stop, not to outwit, not to defeat, not to succumb, not to give up, but to be and share and bring about harmony.

Just because it's hard, just because it seems almost impossible, doesn't mean you cannot achieve it for it is far removed from competiton and fighting and is in truth potentially the art of no fighting, the all powerful discipline of harmony.

This is my view. No doubt there will be many against and many who think I am just whatever......

However, it's a view I share with many and I thought I'd put in in a new worded concept for the record.

Have fun. Regards.G.
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Old 02-26-2011, 07:54 PM   #2
PhillyKiAikido
 
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Re: Three Levels of Aikido

Thanks for this quality post!
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Old 02-26-2011, 08:02 PM   #3
graham christian
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Re: Three Levels of Aikido

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Ting Piao wrote: View Post
Thanks for this quality post!
Thank you very much.
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Old 02-26-2011, 10:25 PM   #4
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Re: Three Levels of Aikido

Quote:
Graham Christian wrote: View Post

From this viewpoint therefore the aim is not to harm, not to resist, not to stop, not to outwit, not to defeat, not to succumb, not to give up, but to be and share and bring about harmony.

Just because it's hard, just because it seems almost impossible, doesn't mean you cannot achieve it for it is far removed from competiton and fighting and is in truth potentially the art of no fighting, the all powerful discipline of harmony.

This is my view. No doubt there will be many against and many who think I am just whatever......

However, it's a view I share with many and I thought I'd put in in a new worded concept for the record.

Have fun. Regards.G.
Graham
Admirable goals and possibly obtainable.....what do you do if you face the individual who is as skilled as you and has no intention of harmony, whose purpose is handling you......or the crazed individual who can't be harmonized? Some of the tools you would need in these situations might require that you resist, that you not give up, until the attacker is outwitted, defeated and stopped, succumbing to your efforts, and may suffer some harm in you saving yourself or those around you. There are those out there you will never be able to harmonize with, who are so far to the dark side they can never come back, folks I hope I never run in to knowing that they are out there...something to consider as you polish yourself........ Keep up your efforts to perfect yourself.
Gary
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Old 02-27-2011, 01:01 AM   #5
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Re: Three Levels of Aikido

Thank you very much for your great post Graham...
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Old 02-27-2011, 02:04 AM   #6
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Re: Three Levels of Aikido

Thanks Graham, I really liked this outlook on things. Though basically it's nothing new, I think you put it in a way, which makes this rather complex issue a bit easier to comprehend.

@Gary
I think when you reached the third level, taking the measure necessary is no problem. On the third level, you will have to be able to end the "confrontation" in a lethal matter at anytime, to be able to control him this way. But on the third level you will also be able to harmonize with everyone. If not you would only be on the second or first level.

But remember that the more you think of this mythical creature of pure darkness, the more likely it is that he will come after you. So beware that you don't let your mind create him.
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Old 02-27-2011, 12:47 PM   #7
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Re: Three Levels of Aikido

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Simon Kirk Sørensen wrote: View Post

@Gary
I think when you reached the third level, taking the measure necessary is no problem. On the third level, you will have to be able to end the "confrontation" in a lethal matter at anytime, to be able to control him this way. But on the third level you will also be able to harmonize with everyone. If not you would only be on the second or first level.

But remember that the more you think of this mythical creature of pure darkness, the more likely it is that he will come after you. So beware that you don't let your mind create him.
Simon I appreciate your concern for my welfare, please don't worry. I understand all of that as does my wife. We are both very aware, protect ourselves, our home and those around as we can.

I am not talking to the mythical aspects of evil, just those that are. I am talking to the tools needed to handle these people, or any situation, at level 1, 2 or 3. Long ago a good friend said that the basis for any progression through what is described here as levels 1, 2, & 3 was developing very good jujitsu skills to support this. Saotome Sensei said (translated) at a workshop here in California back in 1983, stopping us during practice with the tanto, that knives could be used for cutting vegetables or people and in order for you to make the right decision you needed to have the skills at both and the abilities at both. This is what I am talking about. I am not saying not to work on what some would call the aiki aspects, developing personal and interpersonal skills, harmonizing skills, but the base technical skills have to be there and have to be maintained. You can't go from level 2 to level 3 without taking your base skills there also. You have to figure out how you transition these base skill along with your harmonizing skill.

Some of that is what many are trying to do with all the recent effort with internal power, leaning and using. I am sure you have trained with someone who would not give you the throw, you may well run into someone who also has a skill set better developed than yours that you can't handle with level one technical skills. Equal time, solo practice, partner practice, group practice, workshops, seminars, seeking the correct teachers for you...has to be invested in both sides....

Just go straight
Gary
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Old 02-27-2011, 02:19 PM   #8
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Re: Three Levels of Aikido

Thank you for sharing this...

Watch Aikido videos on Aikido Sensei - Aikido Videos
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Old 02-27-2011, 03:00 PM   #9
graham christian
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Re: Three Levels of Aikido

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Graham
Admirable goals and possibly obtainable.....what do you do if you face the individual who is as skilled as you and has no intention of harmony, whose purpose is handling you......or the crazed individual who can't be harmonized? Some of the tools you would need in these situations might require that you resist, that you not give up, until the attacker is outwitted, defeated and stopped, succumbing to your efforts, and may suffer some harm in you saving yourself or those around you. There are those out there you will never be able to harmonize with, who are so far to the dark side they can never come back, folks I hope I never run in to knowing that they are out there...something to consider as you polish yourself........ Keep up your efforts to perfect yourself.
Gary
Hi Gary.
First may I say thank you to Carina and Simon for their acknowledgements,

Thank you also. The scenarios you mention may occur but the goal for me is to be able to keep in the principles and handle accordingly. Of course during training you go through, hopefully, similar representations as par for the course. ie: You train with people of equal skill and get them to be as mean and aggressive and willing to hurt you as you can in order to see and measure your own progress. This is all part of training.

Indeed true confidence comes only when you have done so effectively. So no one I train with is under any false illusion but our measure is how well did we do at keeping to the principles without having to revert to resistance etc.

There are drunks, crazed drugged people, people you say one could never harmonize with but I don't use that as an excuse to revert back to force and fight but more as a challenge to face up to without fear.

Of course I consider these things as does everyone who does this art for we all have minds don't we and the mind will always give you such scenarios. When life brings you face to face with the reality of such a charachter you find out the results of your training. It's not something to fear or be paranoid about in my opinion. There is no reason I can see to give up on these goals I have stated. I have been in situations where I have done as you have said but afterwards I acknowledged myself as it was the best I could do but always know I could do even better, even more relaxed, even more non-resistive, even more harmonious.

Apart from that I balance it off with similar situaions I handle where through the application of the same principles against an equally hostile person harmony was restored with ease and not even a hint of fight or flight or indeed physical control.

I will indeed keep polishing and no doubt learn more and more.

Regards.G.
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Old 02-27-2011, 03:22 PM   #10
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Re: Three Levels of Aikido

Graham
I am not suggesting that you give up your goals, your belief in them or your passion for them....just take your tools to the same level. Felix the Cat had a tool bag that was filled with everything he needed, tools fitting every situation and circumstance....I think it serves us all to approach our journey this way.
Gary
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Old 02-27-2011, 03:44 PM   #11
graham christian
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Re: Three Levels of Aikido

Quote:
Gary Welborn wrote: View Post
Graham
I am not suggesting that you give up your goals, your belief in them or your passion for them....just take your tools to the same level. Felix the Cat had a tool bag that was filled with everything he needed, tools fitting every situation and circumstance....I think it serves us all to approach our journey this way.
Gary
Thank you, I fully agree. In fact I find the more calm, centered, in present time, humble and compassionate you are the sharper and stronger your tools become.

Regards,G.
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Old 05-06-2011, 02:11 PM   #12
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Re: Three Levels of Aikido

In the spirit of this post, it may be of interest to do a search of "shu, ha, ri." I think its been covered on this website before.

Ichi Go, Ichi Ei!
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Old 05-06-2011, 02:49 PM   #13
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Re: Three Levels of Aikido

Quote:
Graham Christian wrote: View Post
From this viewpoint therefore the aim is not to harm, not to resist, not to stop, not to outwit, not to defeat, not to succumb, not to give up, but to be and share
Oh YES!
That's precisely where Aikido differs, that's exactly the most characteristic feature of Aikido to me, and that's why it fascinated me though I was coming from the exact opposite background.

Mock at me all you want - I have placed my best sankyo today. The difference was this: no force at all, just the movement.

I feel so little and incompetent with Aikido (well ok, I figure an Aikido that works in a real situation) and bad habits are so hard to break.
If you can flow, you don't give clues out. If you don't give clues, it's not that you will exploit surprise - it's not trivial and merely tactical like that. It is that a technique does not release clues, if it's well done.

Now, if I only could do that, and remember that also when uke uses blunt force to break my locks!
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Old 05-06-2011, 02:56 PM   #14
C. David Henderson
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Re: Three Levels of Aikido

Nice OP, Graham; clearly expressed and interesting ideas.

Cordially,

David Henderson
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Old 05-06-2011, 04:58 PM   #15
graham christian
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Re: Three Levels of Aikido

Quote:
Adam Huss wrote: View Post
In the spirit of this post, it may be of interest to do a search of "shu, ha, ri." I think its been covered on this website before.
Hi Adam.
I looked up shuhari and yes thank you I liked it.

Alberto and David; Thanks for the acknowledgement.

Regards.G.
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Old 05-07-2011, 06:43 AM   #16
Abasan
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Re: Three Levels of Aikido

Hi Graham, you may like to read what I wrote about it here... http://aikihut.blogspot.com/2010/04/...of-aikido.html

Draw strength from stillness. Learn to act without acting. And never underestimate a samurai cat.
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Old 05-07-2011, 07:43 AM   #17
Lee Crockett
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Re: Three Levels of Aikido

Graham,

There ARE NOT 3 levels of Aikido. Aikido is Aikido, Unification with the Universal.

What you are referring to are levels of training, and there are not 3 levels, there are 4.

They are Kotai, Jutai, Ekitai and Kitai.
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Old 05-07-2011, 09:29 AM   #18
graham christian
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Re: Three Levels of Aikido

Quote:
Lee Crockett wrote: View Post
Graham,

There ARE NOT 3 levels of Aikido. Aikido is Aikido, Unification with the Universal.

What you are referring to are levels of training, and there are not 3 levels, there are 4.

They are Kotai, Jutai, Ekitai and Kitai.
Lee.
I am not referring to anything. I am offering.

They are not levels of training. I offer them as levels of responsibility or you could say potential.

Like your quote though.

Regards.G.
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Old 05-07-2011, 09:30 AM   #19
graham christian
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Re: Three Levels of Aikido

Quote:
Ahmad Abas wrote: View Post
Hi Graham, you may like to read what I wrote about it here... http://aikihut.blogspot.com/2010/04/...of-aikido.html
Hi Ahmad.
Loved it. Nicely put.

Regards.G.
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Old 05-07-2011, 01:54 PM   #20
Alberto_Italiano
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Re: Three Levels of Aikido

Quote:
Graham Christian wrote: View Post
Lee.
I am not referring to anything. I am offering.
Very well said Graham - the fact is, at times our communications may be misunderstood as being based upon "academic" premises - thence the idea (or reply, like apparently in this case) that the "Academy" never stated those things.

However, checking also the nice link you proposed in your latest post, and browsing that site, I found right on top of it this blog entry:
http://aikihut.blogspot.com/2011/04/comfort-zone.html

Since I have a boxing background, and I am a bad aikidoka too and yet very fascinated by aikido, I found that post interesting: for the first time I've see written something that offers (just like you!) an enquiry on Aikido bringing in boxing concepts no longer seen as incompatible but as an opportunity to grow.

Let's quote this passage:

«With boxers, fights can occur every two months or so (...) For a boxer that continues to build himself up like this cumulatively and gradually, his strength will grow from fight to fight»

Now, actually boxers fight every day: you cross jabs and hooks, all of them meant to hit you squarely and not fictionally, everyday in a boxing gym. That's sparring, and the only difference from a competition is that it's gonna last just a few rounds. But you DO fight. Daily.

The strength the post is referring to is not physical: it actually means competence: being fight aware and fight savvy, as a form of "strength".
Only fighting builds it.

Sadly, in Aikido there are normally no competitions, and ukes are often very far from being realistic.
Yet let me say this: nothing, absolutely nothing, improves your effectiveness like fighting as your training routine. I am not saying street fights - but fighting like boxers do. A partner who really attacks you.

In a boxing gym a bleeding nose or a bleeing teeth gum is ordinary administration. Bruised eyes or an occasional black eye too.

Now, I am not suggesting that in Aikido people should hit themselves in the face - boxers, in fact, can do that only after having passed medical tests, to be repeated (at least here where I am, and as far as 20 years ago) every 2 years. I know we can't make medical tests on 60 years old aikidokas to that purpose...

However, it would be possible sparring with determined ukes who face you throwing blows, with open hands say, at your upper chest level, and who do NOT stop awaiting a technique - btw whoever is scared of the possibility of getting a couple of involuntary smacks on his face, should not go to a Martial dojo in the first place!

But I often wondered if in aikido most aikidokas are aware of this - the IMMENSE, IMMENSE, IMMENSE, IMMENSE benefit that to your fighting abilities is provided by regularly tranining, daily or thirce a week, with partners and settings where you have to _fight_.

Unless one doesn't try this setting, one will never appreciate how speedily and how steadily one's fighting abilities (this is inclusive of aikido fighting abilities) will improve.

At first you will be a mess, and THAT is what discourages: you will not look good, and nearly all of your techniques will AT FIRST miserably fail.

But after each single fighting training, the next time you will be better. You will be more aware of a new possibility. You will be aware of a new weak spot. You will be aware of the connections between the way an incoming attack looks and how it may end up exploiting this or that weak spot of yours, how it may produce this or that specific difficulty that you have already experienced in previous fights and against which you will grow more and more guarded. Over time, you may start guessing your attacker's next moves given the very first ones he did, and this simply because you have been already in many sparring fights - how it may benefit your defensive capabilities is beyond description.

To ma a Martial Art is Martial and Art both when it can deal with this. And to deal with this, there is nothing like fighting regularly.

I do not advocate competitions - but in the gap that divedes competition from demonstration has been developed a seemingly and entirely fictional aikido that betrays too clearly how unsuitable (I won't say utterly unusable) it would be if challenged by the fast paced frantic and relentless setting of a real fight.

if there is one contribution that the parallelism that that blog _offers_ between boxing and aikido, it could possibily be this: between hitting faces and mere demonstrations there is plenty of room for a middleway approach - and the sooner aikidokas realize that only fighting improves fighting abilities, the sonner we may see an aikido that works beyond doubts and we will finally stop seeing guys with martial Art backgrounds (i am NOT referring to boxing here) raise an eyebrow when they see our too often too gracious demonstrations "for illustration purposes," that smack too much with the sensation of being "for illustration purposes" forever.

It may not be a popular position, yet, I quote again that blog:

«Its easy to say, a belt ranking or a generalised 'improve everything' but are we really getting better? Or are we just going to the dojo, doing the same thing again and again without a thought to its development. Are our uke's testing us for weaknesses each time?

I wondered at one time not long ago, whether a technique could later become a skill. I guess it could, if we only develop it to become one. Irrespective if there's a partner to help us or not, we need to train like we are fighting the greatest threat of our lives.»
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Old 05-07-2011, 02:46 PM   #21
graham christian
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Re: Three Levels of Aikido

Quote:
Alberto Italiano wrote: View Post
Very well said Graham - the fact is, at times our communications may be misunderstood as being based upon "academic" premises - thence the idea (or reply, like apparently in this case) that the "Academy" never stated those things.

However, checking also the nice link you proposed in your latest post, and browsing that site, I found right on top of it this blog entry:
http://aikihut.blogspot.com/2011/04/comfort-zone.html

Since I have a boxing background, and I am a bad aikidoka too and yet very fascinated by aikido, I found that post interesting: for the first time I've see written something that offers (just like you!) an enquiry on Aikido bringing in boxing concepts no longer seen as incompatible but as an opportunity to grow.

Let's quote this passage:

«With boxers, fights can occur every two months or so (...) For a boxer that continues to build himself up like this cumulatively and gradually, his strength will grow from fight to fight»

Now, actually boxers fight every day: you cross jabs and hooks, all of them meant to hit you squarely and not fictionally, everyday in a boxing gym. That's sparring, and the only difference from a competition is that it's gonna last just a few rounds. But you DO fight. Daily.

The strength the post is referring to is not physical: it actually means competence: being fight aware and fight savvy, as a form of "strength".
Only fighting builds it.

Sadly, in Aikido there are normally no competitions, and ukes are often very far from being realistic.
Yet let me say this: nothing, absolutely nothing, improves your effectiveness like fighting as your training routine. I am not saying street fights - but fighting like boxers do. A partner who really attacks you.

In a boxing gym a bleeding nose or a bleeing teeth gum is ordinary administration. Bruised eyes or an occasional black eye too.

Now, I am not suggesting that in Aikido people should hit themselves in the face - boxers, in fact, can do that only after having passed medical tests, to be repeated (at least here where I am, and as far as 20 years ago) every 2 years. I know we can't make medical tests on 60 years old aikidokas to that purpose...

However, it would be possible sparring with determined ukes who face you throwing blows, with open hands say, at your upper chest level, and who do NOT stop awaiting a technique - btw whoever is scared of the possibility of getting a couple of involuntary smacks on his face, should not go to a Martial dojo in the first place!

But I often wondered if in aikido most aikidokas are aware of this - the IMMENSE, IMMENSE, IMMENSE, IMMENSE benefit that to your fighting abilities is provided by regularly tranining, daily or thirce a week, with partners and settings where you have to _fight_.

Unless one doesn't try this setting, one will never appreciate how speedily and how steadily one's fighting abilities (this is inclusive of aikido fighting abilities) will improve.

At first you will be a mess, and THAT is what discourages: you will not look good, and nearly all of your techniques will AT FIRST miserably fail.

But after each single fighting training, the next time you will be better. You will be more aware of a new possibility. You will be aware of a new weak spot. You will be aware of the connections between the way an incoming attack looks and how it may end up exploiting this or that weak spot of yours, how it may produce this or that specific difficulty that you have already experienced in previous fights and against which you will grow more and more guarded. Over time, you may start guessing your attacker's next moves given the very first ones he did, and this simply because you have been already in many sparring fights - how it may benefit your defensive capabilities is beyond description.

To ma a Martial Art is Martial and Art both when it can deal with this. And to deal with this, there is nothing like fighting regularly.

I do not advocate competitions - but in the gap that divedes competition from demonstration has been developed a seemingly and entirely fictional aikido that betrays too clearly how unsuitable (I won't say utterly unusable) it would be if challenged by the fast paced frantic and relentless setting of a real fight.

if there is one contribution that the parallelism that that blog _offers_ between boxing and aikido, it could possibily be this: between hitting faces and mere demonstrations there is plenty of room for a middleway approach - and the sooner aikidokas realize that only fighting improves fighting abilities, the sonner we may see an aikido that works beyond doubts and we will finally stop seeing guys with martial Art backgrounds (i am NOT referring to boxing here) raise an eyebrow when they see our too often too gracious demonstrations "for illustration purposes," that smack too much with the sensation of being "for illustration purposes" forever.

It may not be a popular position, yet, I quote again that blog:

«Its easy to say, a belt ranking or a generalised 'improve everything' but are we really getting better? Or are we just going to the dojo, doing the same thing again and again without a thought to its development. Are our uke's testing us for weaknesses each time?

I wondered at one time not long ago, whether a technique could later become a skill. I guess it could, if we only develop it to become one. Irrespective if there's a partner to help us or not, we need to train like we are fighting the greatest threat of our lives.»
Alberto.
I read the link and your post. Very well put. This indeed is a matter of responsibility.

Although I follow the path of 'no fighting' the same rules apply to do with improving all the time.

My very first Aikido lesson led me to my first goal, I had to learn how to do that unbendable arm. That has been my attitude all along, always looking for that next aspect of Aikido I had to get good at. This had nothing to do with belts or exams or tests or even what anyone else said but merely my next challenge.

As I've stated before on this forum the thing that led me to Aikido was the challenge of how to harmonize with the opponent. That concept blew my mind.

Along the way it's been targets followed by the next targets, searching out the people I had difficulty with and finding out why and thus improving what needed to be improved until they were no longer a barrier as in truth they weren't actually a barrier but merely a signpost to my next lesson. This I call study and practice rather than rote procedure.

To know thoroughly the principles one by one and how they apply and when they apply. To be able to apply them. Then to be able to apply them more often than not. Then to be able to apply them comfortably with minimal effort. Then to be able to apply them on no matter who. This is more my type of structure and indeed path.

Yet I havn't even mentioned teaching. That itself is an art. A whole new set of targets of improvements. In fact I remember only a few years ago suddenly realizing I could teach anyone. That was a massive one for me, it suddenly didn't matter who came through my door be they a beginner or a 10th dan for I knew I could help them. Now I know of no grade that has that as a qualifier. Thus it's all to do with self developement and progression along your chosen path.

I liked the boxing analogy also as my sparring partner so to speak for the last thirty years was a boxer.

Thanks for your response. G.
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Old 05-07-2011, 04:10 PM   #22
Alberto_Italiano
Join Date: Dec 2009
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Re: Three Levels of Aikido

Quote:
Graham Christian wrote: View Post

Yet I havn't even mentioned teaching. That itself is an art. A whole new set of targets of improvements. In fact I remember only a few years ago suddenly realizing I could teach anyone. That was a massive one for me, it suddenly didn't matter who came through my door be they a beginner or a 10th dan for I knew I could help them.
Exactly. Precisely.
There is actually only one sensei, and none of us is that!

If a person can receive all points of view considering them exactly as you proposed namely as an "offer" and not like an academic discussion or as an attempt to pose as a sensei, then you can become very rich.

Basically, every opponent, for the mere fact s/he is opposing you, is a teacher too.
It is our intelligence, let me say even our humanity, what must be able to see beyond the belts in order to see the human being and his/her potential to be a teacher, or a trove of opportunities, to improve our fighting skills (and this not because we want to fight - nobody would train years in order to cope with an unlikely street assoult: we have guns for that... - but because fighting is highly educational and molds one's character).

I often found failing a techinique against a 6th kyu infinitely more instructive than many words by a teacher. The 6th kyu has teached something! And it's not condesecension: it's the fact the potential any human being harbours, transcends belts.
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Old 05-07-2011, 05:49 PM   #23
Lee Crockett
Dojo: Chichester
Location: Portsmouth
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Re: Three Levels of Aikido

Graham and Alberto

Are you aware of the 4 levels of training, Kotai, Jutai, Ekitai and Kitai? Are you aware of the 9 elements?
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Old 05-07-2011, 06:29 PM   #24
graham christian
Dojo: golden center aikido-highgate
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Re: Three Levels of Aikido

Quote:
Lee Crockett wrote: View Post
Graham and Alberto

Are you aware of the 4 levels of training, Kotai, Jutai, Ekitai and Kitai? Are you aware of the 9 elements?
Should I be? Maybe you can enlighten me. I look foreward to it, really.

Regards.G.
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Old 05-07-2011, 06:52 PM   #25
Lee Crockett
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Re: Three Levels of Aikido

If you are not aware, then i would recommend a little further reading.
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