Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > General

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-29-2011, 02:16 PM   #26
sakumeikan
Dojo: Sakumeikan N.E. Aikkai .Newcastle upon Tyne.
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,266
United Kingdom
Offline
Re: How well are you treated when you visit other dojo

Quote:
Alex Megann wrote: View Post
I have always been made welcome at other dojos - in fact, this is one thing I find quite special about aikido. I also try to make visitors from other dojos and styles feel appreciated and welcomed in my own classes.

When I first started teaching in my own (Aikikai affiliated) dojo, a few of us started visiting the local Tomiki club once a week, and were treated very well. Some aspects of the class were rather unfamiliar, especially the solo footwork and tegatana exercises, and I could never get the hang of the randori with the rubber knife, but there was of course plenty of overlap.

More recently, I have made a habit of taking my dogi when I have travelled for work, and have dropped in on the local dojo: this has without exception been a very enjoyable experience. I normally e-mail the instructor or secretary a few days beforehand (although I did surprise Peter Brady in Birmingham a few years ago, having completely failed to get through to his club secretary). I have particular praise for Miami Aikikai, which I have visited twice - a nice vigorous practice, which I don't often have the chance to get at home.

My own attitude is that one should try to fit into the training environment as much as possible, and leave everything pertaining to "style", grade and training history until after the class - this has always worked for me.

By the way, Joe would always be welcome in Southampton...

Alex
Dear Alex,
Very nice of you to make an offer to welcome me to Southhampton.Considering my past involvement with the B.A.F or to be more precise certain parties in the B.A.F I consider your gesture most magnaminous. I appreciate your comments very much. Hope you are well.
Cheers, Joe.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2011, 02:31 PM   #27
crbateman
  AikiWeb Forums Contributing Member
 
crbateman's Avatar
Location: Orlando, FL
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 1,479
Offline
Re: How well are you treated when you visit other dojo

I have seldom been made to feel unwelcome in any Aikido dojo, and I make it a point to visit as many as I can. In fact, most folks are happy and curious, respectful and most accommodating, sometimes to the point that I almost feel embarrassed. I think the key is to go in being humble and respecting the way that they may prefer to do things. Another thing that helps me, I think, is that I'm up front about training "ronin style". By not waving the banner of any particular style or lineage, it seems to be less "in-your-face" and less offensive. I will also never utter the words "Here's how they do it where I come from...". If asked directly whether I have experienced "alternatives", I will respond in a purposefully non-judgmental way, without so much as a hint of condescension. I just think that as I give, so I'll receive, and I have seldom been disappointed.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2011, 02:40 PM   #28
Peter Goldsbury
  AikiWeb Forums Contributing Member
 
Peter Goldsbury's Avatar
Dojo: Hiroshima Kokusai Dojo
Location: Hiroshima, Japan
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 2,085
Japan
Offline
Re: How well are you treated when you visit other dojo

Quote:
Alex Megann wrote: View Post
As I understand it, Pat Stratford has a connection with Shigeho Tanaka (who was, incidentally, the teacher of Minoru Inaba, the latter being mainly responsible for the influence of Kashima Shinryu on aikido, but that's another story). I have seen a film of Tanaka Sensei which I found rather impressive - very charismatic and very powerful, although I have no experience of Pat Stratford himself.

Here is a site with some more information on Stratford Sensei's lineage, although it seems to be rather out of date.

Alex
Hello Alex,

Your post was very interesting. At the risk of some thread drift, I would like to pursue it further. Actually, on further reflection, my post does relate to training at other dojos, but not in the UK.

I noticed this statement on the website you cited in your post.

"Whilst studying at Sussex University he [Pat Stratford] met Norio Tao, now 7th Dan, who in turn introduced him to Master Shigeho Tanaka."

Tao [this was the name we always used] was a student of transport economics who graduated in 1970, I believe. I was an undergraduate at Sussex from 1966 to 1969 and it was at Sussex that I began aikido at the hands of Norio Tao. At the time, Tao had a 3rd dan (given by Morihei Ueshiba) and wanted to continue training while he was a student, so he and a handful of his students started an aikido club. I was one of the handful and the two years I spent training under his direction marked the beginning of a friendship that has continued to the present. We last met in Hiroshima in 2008.
Through Tao, I met Tanaka Shigeho and Inaba Minoru and practiced very occasionally at the Meiji Jingu Dojo in Tokyo. Meiji Jingu was not strictly Aikikai (the connection is extremely complicated) but I was always made very welcome. Coincidentally, I discovered a link with Yamaguchi Seigo. Yamaguchi Sensei visited Hiroshima quite regularly and, of course, knew Tao, as did Doshu Kisshomaru Ueshiba.

I once discussed this small world of Japanese aikido with Chiba Kazuo Sensei, at whose dojo in Chiswick I trained intermittently after Tao returned to Japan. He never met Tao while the latter was in England, but knew about him. The rather exclusive nature of aikido at Tokyo University (Tao was a graduate of the very prestigious Faculty of Law: the Japanese counterpart of Harvard) would have made this very difficult: a fact that I now understand very well.

Actually, it is far more difficult in Japan to visit dojos outside one's own organization than it appears to be in the UK.

How is your father, by the way. I hope he is well. I regret that we have not been in contact recently.

Best wishes,

PAG

P A Goldsbury
_______________________
Hiroshima, Japan
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2011, 03:42 PM   #29
ninjaqutie
 
ninjaqutie's Avatar
Dojo: Searching for a new home
Location: Delaware (<3 still in Oregon!)
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,002
United_States
Offline
Re: How well are you treated when you visit other dojo

Come to Oregon Joe! I'm sure you will be accomodated here.

~Look into the eyes of your opponent & steal his spirit.
~To be a good martial artist is to be good thief; if you want my knowledge, you must take it from me.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2011, 04:03 PM   #30
sakumeikan
Dojo: Sakumeikan N.E. Aikkai .Newcastle upon Tyne.
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,266
United Kingdom
Offline
Re: How well are you treated when you visit other dojo

Quote:
Ashley Carter wrote: View Post
Come to Oregon Joe! I'm sure you will be accomodated here.
Dear Ashley,
I would like to think so since my Oregon friends, Bluhm Sensei and Robert Nagato Needleman and his lovely missus are there. I would love to see the beautiful trees and mountains in that part of the U.S.A. Also a visit to Roberts Tiger sanctuary would be hiigh on my list of things to do.Usually I end up in San Diego visiting Chiba Sensei . I do appreciate your mail,
Cheers, Joe.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2011, 04:11 PM   #31
SeiserL
 
SeiserL's Avatar
Location: Florida Gulf coast
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 3,803
United_States
Offline
Re: How well are you treated when you visit other dojo

I have always been treated well where ever I go.

This has always surpirsed me.

Lynn Seiser PhD
Yondan Aikido & FMA/JKD
We do not rise to the level of our expectations, but fall to the level of our training. Train well. KWATZ!
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2011, 05:18 PM   #32
kewms
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 1,316
Offline
Re: How well are you treated when you visit other dojo

Quote:
Joe Curran wrote: View Post
Dear Marc,
I am referring to the local dojos in my own backyard. I have always been welcomed by dojos in France, Greece, U.S.A, Tunisia and Holland. As it happens I consider I am made far more welcome by strangers than by people I have known over the years . Certain people within the U.K aikido community sad to say are not on my Xmas card list.
Cheers, Joe.
That is, alas, not an attitude exclusive to the UK. A friend of mine back in Boston was literally not allowed to register for a seminar at one of the other dojos in town. I've never attempted to train there, but I've never been anything but welcome elsewhere, even at out of town affiliates of that same dojo.

Katherine
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2011, 03:14 AM   #33
Eva Antonia
Dojo: CERIA
Location: Brussels
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 212
Belgium
Offline
Re: How well are you treated when you visit other dojo

Hello,

I've already done both - invited people to my dojo and been a guest to other dojos (Istanbul regularly, Ankara, Baku, Abidjan and some Belgian dojos), and I've always been treated very very well notwithstanding style or cultural differences. In Ivory Coast and Azerbaidjan the people even invited me after training to eat and drink and chat about aikido & life...I really loved these experiences. I tried to go to a karate dojo in Port Harcourt, Nigeria, but was not allowed by my employer...for security reasons

And here in Belgium I've already hosted several aikidoka couchsurfers (there is an aikido sub-site on www.couchsurfing.org, very useful!); it was always an enriching experience!

Maybe the only feeble disappointment could be that sometimes people from other dojos/ styles try to prove that THEIR way of doing XYZ is really the best and what you learn in your dojo might be valid, but a it less than theirs. But maybe that's just some temptation people CANNOT resist to....

And maybe next week I'll try one in Budapest???

Best regards,

Eva
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2011, 06:26 AM   #34
Walter Martindale
Location: Cambridge, ON
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 712
Canada
Offline
Re: How well are you treated when you visit other dojo

Quote:
Eva Röben wrote: View Post
"Safari can't find the server"

Oops - tried again - there it is...
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2011, 07:00 AM   #35
Alex Megann
Dojo: Southampton Aikikai
Location: Southampton
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 371
United Kingdom
Offline
Re: How well are you treated when you visit other dojo

Quote:
Peter A Goldsbury wrote: View Post
Hello Alex,

Your post was very interesting. At the risk of some thread drift, I would like to pursue it further. Actually, on further reflection, my post does relate to training at other dojos, but not in the UK.

I noticed this statement on the website you cited in your post.

"Whilst studying at Sussex University he [Pat Stratford] met Norio Tao, now 7th Dan, who in turn introduced him to Master Shigeho Tanaka."

Tao [this was the name we always used] was a student of transport economics who graduated in 1970, I believe. I was an undergraduate at Sussex from 1966 to 1969 and it was at Sussex that I began aikido at the hands of Norio Tao. At the time, Tao had a 3rd dan (given by Morihei Ueshiba) and wanted to continue training while he was a student, so he and a handful of his students started an aikido club. I was one of the handful and the two years I spent training under his direction marked the beginning of a friendship that has continued to the present. We last met in Hiroshima in 2008.
Through Tao, I met Tanaka Shigeho and Inaba Minoru and practiced very occasionally at the Meiji Jingu Dojo in Tokyo. Meiji Jingu was not strictly Aikikai (the connection is extremely complicated) but I was always made very welcome. Coincidentally, I discovered a link with Yamaguchi Seigo. Yamaguchi Sensei visited Hiroshima quite regularly and, of course, knew Tao, as did Doshu Kisshomaru Ueshiba.

I once discussed this small world of Japanese aikido with Chiba Kazuo Sensei, at whose dojo in Chiswick I trained intermittently after Tao returned to Japan. He never met Tao while the latter was in England, but knew about him. The rather exclusive nature of aikido at Tokyo University (Tao was a graduate of the very prestigious Faculty of Law: the Japanese counterpart of Harvard) would have made this very difficult: a fact that I now understand very well.

Actually, it is far more difficult in Japan to visit dojos outside one's own organization than it appears to be in the UK.

How is your father, by the way. I hope he is well. I regret that we have not been in contact recently.

Best wishes,

PAG
Hi Peter,

As it happens, I did think of you when I saw mention of Tao Sensei and Brighton on that webpage, since I remember you mentioning in one of your articles that he was your first aikido teacher.

I knew of the connection with Yamaguchi Sensei via Inaba Sensei - in my opinion Yamaguchi Sensei's aikido was strongly influenced by the kesagiri swordwork of Kashima Shinryu (there is a very rare clip of him practising this on William Gleason's DVD, by the way). Tanaka Sensei also demonstrated kesagiri on the film I saw of him (which incidentally belonged to Kanetsuka Sensei).

I have had two people practising regularly at the Southampton Dojo recently who had been to the Meiji Jingu Shiseikan, one of them through Paul Smith in London, who has his own relationship with Inaba Sensei. It is interesting to hear you describe the Shiseikan as "not strictly Aikikai": Paul Smith himself has told me that Inaba himself doesn't teach "regular" aikido, and the focus seems rather more on the sword practice itself and on relaxation and centre-to-centre contact than on what you might call "orthodox" technique.

Yes, my father is very well, and still teaching one class each week at the Oxford Dojo. I'm sure he would be very pleased to hear from you...

Alex
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2011, 07:54 AM   #36
Takahama
Dojo: Osaka Aikikai Hombu
Location: Osaka
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 44
Japan
Offline
Re: How well are you treated when you visit other dojo

Quote:
Alex Megann wrote: View Post
I have always been made welcome at other dojos - in fact, this is one thing I find quite special about aikido. I also try to make visitors from other dojos and styles feel appreciated and welcomed in my own classes.

When I first started teaching in my own (Aikikai affiliated) dojo, a few of us started visiting the local Tomiki club once a week, and were treated very well. Some aspects of the class were rather unfamiliar, especially the solo footwork and tegatana exercises, and I could never get the hang of the randori with the rubber knife, but there was of course plenty of overlap.

More recently, I have made a habit of taking my dogi when I have travelled for work, and have dropped in on the local dojo: this has without exception been a very enjoyable experience. I normally e-mail the instructor or secretary a few days beforehand (although I did surprise Peter Brady in Birmingham a few years ago, having completely failed to get through to his club secretary). I have particular praise for Miami Aikikai, which I have visited twice - a nice vigorous practice, which I don't often have the chance to get at home.

My own attitude is that one should try to fit into the training environment as much as possible, and leave everything pertaining to "style", grade and training history until after the class - this has always worked for me.

By the way, Joe would always be welcome in Southampton...

Alex
I recall visiting your dojo some 12 or 13 years ago when I was home from Japan one time. I couldn't have asked for a more friendlier environment in which to train; I felt very welcome - both during training and in the pub afterwards.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2011, 08:24 AM   #37
Alex Megann
Dojo: Southampton Aikikai
Location: Southampton
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 371
United Kingdom
Offline
Re: How well are you treated when you visit other dojo

Quote:
Michael Lewis wrote: View Post
I recall visiting your dojo some 12 or 13 years ago when I was home from Japan one time. I couldn't have asked for a more friendlier environment in which to train; I felt very welcome - both during training and in the pub afterwards.
Hi Michael,

Thank you for your generous comments, and I'm glad you enjoyed your time with us - I hope you will call in again on your next trip home!

Alex
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2011, 09:38 AM   #38
makuchg
 
makuchg's Avatar
Dojo: FL Aikido Center
Location: Spring Hill, FL
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 84
United_States
Offline
Re: How well are you treated when you visit other dojo

I have always been welcomed. I traveled a lot when I was in the military and had the opportunity to train in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Virginia, Georgia, Arizona, Florida, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Afghanistan, and Japan (Okinawa). I've never heard a discouraging word (and the sky was not cloudy all day...sorry, couldn't resist).

I highly recommend it for a different perspective. I've met amazing people many of whom I stay in touch with and I consider dear friends.

Gregory Makuch
Wandering Ronin
Spring Hill, FL
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2011, 09:22 PM   #39
Takahama
Dojo: Osaka Aikikai Hombu
Location: Osaka
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 44
Japan
Offline
Re: How well are you treated when you visit other dojo

Quote:
Alex Megann wrote: View Post
Hi Michael,

Thank you for your generous comments, and I'm glad you enjoyed your time with us - I hope you will call in again on your next trip home!

Alex
My brother still lives in Southampton so maybe I could get the chance again in the future. I'd like that.

Regards,

Michael
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2011, 10:17 PM   #40
susanmarie
Location: Columbus, MS
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 17
United_States
Offline
Re: How well are you treated when you visit other dojo

I train regularly at several local dojo and have visited others in upstate NY and the UK while visiting friends/family. Everyone has been very nice and welcoming, and I look forward to more trips to the area.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2011, 11:28 PM   #41
aikidoaddict
Dojo: Aikido Alliance Australia Inc.
Location: Melbourne
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 60
Australia
Offline
Re: How well are you treated when you visit other dojo

Quote:
Henry Ellis wrote: View Post
I was in Australia many years ago, I visited Perth - I was informed that there was an Aikido dojo nearby. I went to the dojo and everyone was on the mat, I entered with good etiquette and sat quietly watching. other than a high grade looking at me for approval everytime he made a technique, no one spoke to me, as the class ended they put the mats away and still ignored me. I began to feel like the invisible man .I left before they turned the lights off and locked me in...

I then went up near Cairns where I visited a dojo run by a Robbie and Greta, they were so welcoming and charming, invited me to their home and to teach at the dojo. I went out in the evening for a meal with the students. I really did enjoy meeting them and training with them and their students..

Henry Ellis
http://henryellis-aikido.blogspot.com/
Dear Henry,
If that was the same aikikai group in Australia that I was with for many years, I fully understand and apologise for their normal reactions and treatment towards any outsider who happen enter their private realm. I myself came from New Zealand to Australia back in 1985 and was with a certain Aikido association in Australia for over 15 years before I finally resigned (teaching at their Hombu Dojo in Victoria for over 7 years). I was constantly treated as an outsider, frequently overlooked for gradings and mostly ignored by the hierarchy. Despite all that my Aikido grew and grew, and I had rather large following of like minded students and enjoyed my time there. My deepest apologies, on their behalf, for they know not what they do. Like hamsters in a wheel, they know nothing of the outside world and are so suspicious of everyone coming from the real world. if only their Aikido ability was half that of their arrogance and ignorance.
Paul
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2011, 09:08 AM   #42
Mark Mueller
Location: Louisville Kentucky
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 163
Offline
Re: How well are you treated when you visit other dojo

Early in my Aikido journey I traveled for my work quite a bit but I always packed a gi and hakama so I could try out new dojos. I was in San Diego and went to visit a local dojo. Well I evidently made a huge gaffe....I wore my hakama (I was affiliated with ASU where you wear them after your first test). I was informed of my mistake and I quickly took it off and apologized). The instructor then assigned me a "host" who I practiced with the rest of the class....who then proceeded to try and thrash me about on every technique. My ukemi was good enough to take the abuse but I literally had to slam my hand on the mat to slap out for the pins and submissions. I walked out of there bruised and sore and pissed. But in 24 years of practice that was my only bad experience. It also inspired me to really ramp up my practice to never let that happen to me again.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2011, 09:26 AM   #43
Hellis
Dojo: Ellis Schools of Traditional Aikido
Location: Bracknell
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 634
England
Offline
Re: How well are you treated when you visit other dojo

Quote:
Paul Araki-Metcalfe wrote: View Post
Dear Henry,
If that was the same aikikai group in Australia that I was with for many years, I fully understand and apologise for their normal reactions and treatment towards any outsider who happen enter their private realm. I myself came from New Zealand to Australia back in 1985 and was with a certain Aikido association in Australia for over 15 years before I finally resigned (teaching at their Hombu Dojo in Victoria for over 7 years). I was constantly treated as an outsider, frequently overlooked for gradings and mostly ignored by the hierarchy. Despite all that my Aikido grew and grew, and I had rather large following of like minded students and enjoyed my time there. My deepest apologies, on their behalf, for they know not what they do. Like hamsters in a wheel, they know nothing of the outside world and are so suspicious of everyone coming from the real world. if only their Aikido ability was half that of their arrogance and ignorance.
Paul
Hi Paul
I don't know who the group were in Perth - I did not get a chance to introduce myself - In 55 years of Aikido that is a first for me.
I hear of dojos telling visitors that they do not recognise their grades, what does it matter what belt you wear, you wear it - you live with it..My teacher Kenshiro Abbe Sensei would often say " No matter your pretense - you are what you are and nothing more.".
It sounds to me that you are well away from that dojo.
Good luck to you.

Henry Ellis

British Aikido the Origins from 1955

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5pOv-0xaBI

Last edited by Hellis : 06-26-2011 at 09:29 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2011, 04:57 PM   #44
Adam Huss
 
Adam Huss's Avatar
Location: Ohio
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 699
United_States
Offline
Re: How well are you treated when you visit other dojo

I've travelled a bit and usually try to attempt a dojo visit. It has been mostly good, with occasional snobiness, and sometimes simple neglect or apathy toward my presence. Anyway, most times its a great experience and sometimes ends in going out for dinner and/or beers afterward. Some of the best welcome's I've recieved (outside of my organization or people I know, or know by proxy) have been in the Tidewater area (I think Norfolk area) though I don't remember the name, Andy Sato Sensei's dojo in Chitown (owe you guys a bottle of sake and royalties for three techniques I stole for my nidan shinsa), Moore Sensei's dojo in Chitown (though he was away when I was there), a small church dojo in Kenosha, and a small aikijujitsu dojo in Cbus. Thanks all, and I apologize if I've left anyone out!

Ichi Go, Ichi Ei!
  Reply With Quote

Please visit our sponsor:

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!



Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Yoshinkai - Beyond the "Hard Style" Label Susan Dalton Columns 8 11-16-2011 07:53 AM
Which dojo? tabdulmajid General 6 10-23-2007 11:29 AM
Please help me find a dojo in Melbourne! ShugyoSystems General 90 05-17-2005 03:51 AM
Need advice/new guy to area's dojo YinYaker Training 17 02-15-2005 02:57 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:35 PM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2016 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2016 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate