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Old 12-13-2010, 08:00 PM   #101
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

Quote:
Carina Reinhardt wrote: View Post
And Demetrio all opinions do deserve respect
Well, yes -- if they really are opinions; that is, they are a personal perspective on a matter that has no factual basis for determining the truth. It is my opinion that chocolate is the very best kind of cake; if your opinion is that the very best kind of cake is vanilla, your opinion is equally valid and worthy of respect as mine.

If, however, you make a statement about something that has a basis in fact, you can't call it an "opinion" and thus shield it from scrutiny and challenge. If I say that 2+2=5, and when challenged, then claim that this is my opinion and deserves respect, I'm just appropriating and misusing the term "opinion". The same is true of the definitions of words, as I explained in an earlier comment. While the meanings of words aren't as unambiguous as simple arithmetic, they're also not infinitely variable, and particularly not variable on the user's whim. I can't simply use the word "banana" to mean "wineglass", and then when challenged make some tenuous connection that bananas are curved and so are wineglasses, and both contain something that nourishes, and therefore "banana" can mean "wineglass", and then call it an "opinion" and say it's worthy of respect. Language is flexible, but it doesn't work that way.

‘When I use a word,' Humpty Dumpty said, in a rather scornful tone,' it means just what I choose it to mean, neither more nor less.'
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Old 12-13-2010, 10:13 PM   #102
Janet Rosen
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

Well said, Mary.

Janet Rosen
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Old 12-13-2010, 11:32 PM   #103
Keith Larman
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H38LiqJdzvI

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Old 12-14-2010, 02:39 AM   #104
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

Quote:
Mary Malmros wrote: View Post
The threat, or the thread? And why are you asking me my own question, which was asking YOU why you felt the need to conflate two different terms?
Sorry for not knowing the english language so well as you, yes it was the thread, may I can answer in spanish, it is the hilo
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Old 12-14-2010, 02:41 AM   #105
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

Quote:
Mary Malmros wrote: View Post
Well, yes -- if they really are opinions; that is, they are a personal perspective on a matter that has no factual basis for determining the truth. It is my opinion that chocolate is the very best kind of cake; if your opinion is that the very best kind of cake is vanilla, your opinion is equally valid and worthy of respect as mine.

If, however, you make a statement about something that has a basis in fact, you can't call it an "opinion" and thus shield it from scrutiny and challenge. If I say that 2+2=5, and when challenged, then claim that this is my opinion and deserves respect, I'm just appropriating and misusing the term "opinion". The same is true of the definitions of words, as I explained in an earlier comment. While the meanings of words aren't as unambiguous as simple arithmetic, they're also not infinitely variable, and particularly not variable on the user's whim. I can't simply use the word "banana" to mean "wineglass", and then when challenged make some tenuous connection that bananas are curved and so are wineglasses, and both contain something that nourishes, and therefore "banana" can mean "wineglass", and then call it an "opinion" and say it's worthy of respect. Language is flexible, but it doesn't work that way.

‘When I use a word,' Humpty Dumpty said, in a rather scornful tone,' it means just what I choose it to mean, neither more nor less.'
Of course it is my personal perspective on the matter , I don't think I said anything else, did I?
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Old 12-14-2010, 02:50 AM   #106
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

Quote:
Carina Reinhardt wrote: View Post
Of course it is my personal perspective on the matter , I don't think I said anything else, did I?
There's no room for personal perspectives on the matter, Carina. Specially you being a gaijin and not knowing the language. Is that really so hard to understand?
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Old 12-14-2010, 02:58 AM   #107
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

Quote:
Alejandro Villanueva wrote: View Post
There's no room for personal perspectives on the matter, Carina. Specially you being a gaijin and not knowing the language. Is that really so hard to understand?
Sorry for not agreeing with you scholar of the japanese language
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Old 12-14-2010, 03:23 AM   #108
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

From now on is my personal opinion the german word "erbse" means "horse" (in english) and "mesa" (in spanish) because all of them have a dodecahedric shape and usually come in brilliant purplepink colour.

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Old 12-14-2010, 05:24 AM   #109
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

Quote:
Carina Reinhardt wrote: View Post
Sorry for not agreeing with you scholar of the japanese language
You are only showing your uttermost ignorance and disrespect for the truth. It speaks tons about yourself. I feel so sorry about you. I'm so sad now I will take that kleenex. Thanks.
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Old 12-14-2010, 05:57 AM   #110
Peter Goldsbury
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

Hello Matthew,

Here are a few comments on the rest of your earlier post (#38). Be prepared for a long post.

Quote:
Matthew Gano wrote: View Post
Also, if sometimes we can look at the roots of a compound to understand it's meaning, but not always, how can we tell when it's appropriate to do so?
PAG. Consider the word Hiroshima. This is written in Japanese in four different ways: 廣島, 広島, ひろしま, and ヒロシマ. All four are used in modern Japanese. I think people would agree that the word designates the city in Japan on which the atomic bomb was dropped in 1945. However, the sense, the meaning, is different. 広 hiro means 'wide' and 島 shima means 'island'. However, there is little point in looking at the roots of the compound in order to understand what this word means. When people think of Hiroshima, they think about a particular city, not about wide islands.

With other words, which are not proper names, there is rarely a need to understand the meaning of a compound by looking at the roots, unless you want to speculate about how the Chinese or Japanese originally composed the word, or unless you hear the word, out of context, and want to know what the components actually are. Thus, kikaki 気化器 means 'carburetor' and it will not make any difference to the meaning of the word to know the meaning of each of the constituents, though it might be interesting to consider how the word was actually created. Equally, 起原, 期限, and 機嫌 are all read as kigen, but 気 is not a constituent.

Quote:
Matthew Gano wrote: View Post
I'm fairly confident I have heard genki described as something akin to "the fundamental nature of ki," in the teachings of Tsubaki Okami Yashiro; assuming I am remembering correctly and not missing some nuance, doesn't this lend some authority to the idea...at least in terms of an authentic spiritual point of view?
PAG. I do not believe that KI has a fundamental nature, or has one basic concept. Here are a number of definitions, all taken from the Kojien 広辞苑, which is the Japanese equivalent of the OED. There are five core definitions. I give first (a) the Japanese, then (b) the reading, (c) a very rough translation, and finally (d) a few compounds or expressions.

1 (a) 天地間を満たした、宇宙を構成する基本と考えるもの。また、その動き。
(b) Tenchikan wo mitashita, uchu wo kosei suru kihon to kangaeru mono. Mata, sono ugoki.
(c) Something thought to be fundamental, which constitutes the earth / universe and which completely occupies the space between heaven and earth. The movement of this fundamental element.
(d) 気象, kisho: weather; 気候, kiko: climate; 天気, tenki: weather

2 (a) 生命の原動力となる勢い。活力の源。
(b) Seimei no gendoryoku to naru ikioi. Katsuryoku no minamoto.
(c) The force that is the prime mover of life. The source of vitality/vigor.
(d) 気勢, kisei: ardor; 精気, seiki: vitality; 元気, genki: vigor, health

3 (a) 心の動き・状態・働きを包括的に表す語。ただし、この語が用いられる個々の文脈において、心のどの面に重点を置くかは様々である。
(b) Kokoro no ugoki, jotai, hataraki wo hokatsuteki ni arawasu go. Tadashi, kono go ga mochiirareru koko no bunmyaku ni oite, kokoro no dono men ni juten wo oku no ka wa samazama de aru.
(c) Utterance(s) that inclusively/comprehensively express(es) the movement, circumstances and working of the heart/mind. However, according to the various contexts in which the utterance(s) is/are used, there are various ways of emphasizing particular aspects of the heart/mind.
(d) 気を回す, ki wo mawasu; suspect, give play to the imagination, make suspicious conjectures
気が向く, ki ga muku: in the mood (for doing something)
気が狂う, ki ga muruu: go mad; take leave of one's senses
心気, shinki: mood
気を利かす, ki wo kikasu: have one's wits about one
気負い立つ, kioi tatsu: nerve oneself for a struggle

4 (a) はっきりとは見えなくても、その場を包み、その場に漂うと感ぜられるもの。
(b) Hakkiri to wa mienakute mo, sono ba wo tsutsumi, sono ba ni to kanzeraru mono.
(c) Even though it cannot be seen, something that envelops a particular place or is felt to be in that place.
(d) 気体, kitai: gas; 気圧, kiatsu: atmospheric pressure; 鬼気, kiki: eerie;霊気, reiki: mysterious atmosphere; 雰囲気, fun'iki: ambience, atmosphere.

5 その物事来の性質を形作るような要素。特有の香や味。
Sono monogoto rai no seishitsu wo katachizukuruyona yoso. Tokuyu no kaori ya aji.
The ingredient that gives form to the particular character for a thing. Characteristic smell or taste.
気の抜いたビール, ki no nuita biiru: beer that has lost its taste.

What is ‘an authentic spiritual point of view'? One that is ‘really' spiritual, or a view, whether ‘spiritual' or not, that someone is entitled to have? I cannot really accept that the notion [that genki is akin to the fundamental nature of KI] is itself spiritual. Of course, someone can well include this notion as part of a general spiritual view, but this is to add something extra, in my opinion, as Shinto might well do. The closest the Kojien comes to any notion of spiritual is in (3), with the mention of 心 kokoro, which has a wide range of meanings.

Best wishes,

PAG

Last edited by Peter Goldsbury : 12-14-2010 at 05:59 AM.

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Old 12-14-2010, 06:18 AM   #111
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

Quote:
Carina Reinhardt wrote: View Post
Of course it is my personal perspective on the matter , I don't think I said anything else, did I?
You didn't, but my point is that it doesn't make any sense to have a "personal perspective" on whether 2+2=5. As the saying goes, "You have the right to your own opinion; you don't have the right to your own facts." I can't say that "banana" means "wineglass" and claim that this is valid because it is my "personal perspective". I don't get to have my own meaning for words, or they're not words any more, they're just meaningless syllables that can't perform the first function of a word: to communicate.
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Old 12-14-2010, 06:52 AM   #112
Peter Goldsbury
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

Quote:
Peter A Goldsbury wrote: View Post

4 (a) はっきりとは見えなくても、その場を包み、その場に漂うと感ぜられるもの。
(b) Hakkiri to wa mienakute mo, sono ba wo tsutsumi, sono ba ni to kanzeraru mono.
(c) Even though it cannot be seen, something that envelops a particular place or is felt to be in that place.
(d) 気体, kitai: gas; 気圧, kiatsu: atmospheric pressure; 鬼気, kiki: eerie;霊気, reiki: mysterious atmosphere; 雰囲気, fun'iki: ambience, atmosphere.

Best wishes,

PAG
EDIT:
(b) Hakkiri to wa mienakute mo, sono ba wo tsutsumi, sono ba ni tadayou to kanzeraru mono.
(c) Even though it cannot be seen, something that envelops a particular place or is felt to move about in that place.

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Old 12-14-2010, 07:16 AM   #113
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

Thank you, Peter....That was very interesting to me.
Mary
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Old 12-14-2010, 09:01 AM   #114
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

Aside from the meanings of the word ki (thank you very much, and hello, Peter), there remains disagreement about using that word in the sentence "ki is kindness," not as a semantic proposition, but one about the world.

Here, the statement is asserted to reflect (a participatory) reality to a believer, but a self-induced illusion to non-believers.

I think Jon stated it very well, from my perspective, when he talked about the decision to bring from a self-contained training environment and to a wider and experienced audience propositions about the world "discovered" in the mutual interactions of that training setting.

For aikido to articulate with the real world as budo, its effect cannot depend on mutual agreement between training partners.

Equally, for me at least, if my aikido is is to have any "spiritual element" in it (in the sense that Chiba has written about, in particular), it cannot depend solely on the apparent insights to be gained in an environment where we already assume certain principles to be true and discuss them in agreed-upon terms.

This I believe to be true of phenomenological appearances (e.g., since the nice people I train with block themselves when they are not relaxed, and since they relax when they intend no harm, ergo ki is kindness), and also the conceptual framework employed to describe and understand phenomena ("ki is kindness" even when I had a real-world encounter with a particular threat -- with a "t"-- because I was effective and I meant no harm.) .

And the conceptual expression of lessons-believed-learned is where, to me, critical thought does play a role similar to the role pressure testing plays in practice.

As for opinions, I would add that everyone has a right to reconsider, reexamine, and even reject their previous held ones. However, this is where Wittgenstein's views on religion comes to mind, which is why I am confident our apparent differences will remain unresolved.

Everyone take care; my apologies to any whom I may have offended.

David Henderson
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Old 12-14-2010, 11:20 AM   #115
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

Quote:
Carina Reinhardt wrote: View Post
And Demetrio all opinions do deserve respect
Just as an aside...
No, I do not think that all opinions do deserve respect. The people who hold the opinions deserve respect. When someone throws out an opinion, it's just like posting something on the internet... once it's out there it's "open season".

People have all sorts of "opinions" and they certainly aren't of equal value. Opinions, as one can clearly see on the forums, can be unfounded, poorly articulated, unsustainable rationally, etc. Those opinions are not worthy of respect no matter how well intentioned the person having those opinions might be.

Out of respect for that person, one might attempt to be polite about how one might disabuse said person of his delusional ideas. Peter G is an exemplar of this approach. He is never rude or disrespectful of the person even when he is totally destroying some idiotic opinion.

It's just like our discussions of Aikido on a technical level. Everyone wants to think his or her effort is enough, wishes to be validated for whatever level of effort they can put forth. Everyone wants to feel like his opinion is worth something. But it's really just like ones Aikido... if you want to be "validated" for your Aikido, make your Aikido better. If you want your opinions to be worthy of respect, they need to be well thought out, well articulated, at least semi-rational and sustainable.

Strength in numbers doesn't really help either. Whereas having a number of other folks agree with ones unfounded suppositions may give one a sense of community, it doesn't make the opinion expressed any better. The "fifty million Elvis fans can't be wrong" approach is off base. Sure they can be wrong, just look at how we Americans are putting the Right back in power after eight years of getting hosed by the same folks.

On the forums, I expect to see civilized discourse. I realize that our entire culture has gradually been conditioned to look at everything from the standpoint of conflict, everything must be sensationalized and preferably involve screaming at one another... but thankfully, Jun attempts to keep a lid on that.

Too often these discussions devolve quite quickly into personal diatribe. Rather like the old Saturday Night Live "Jane you ignorant slut!" and "Dan you Fascist Pig!". I think that is pretty much wrong headed and it doesn't evince any real understanding of Budo or Aikido on the part of the folks on either side.

Anyway, in terms of the original supposition that Ki has something to do with "kindness", well, just look at this thread. Everyone one here on the forum has "Ki". If they didn't they would be dead. Not everyone on the forum is "kind", therefore, ipso facto, there is no essential connection between "ki" and "kindness". So, an unsustainable opinion, not terribly worthy of respect, but delivered by quite respectable people, who have every right to be respected. I think that one can see the opportunity for the personal practice of "non-attachment" in the Buddhist sense.

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Old 12-14-2010, 11:42 AM   #116
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

Quote:
The closest the Kojien comes to any notion of spiritual is in (3), with the mention of 心 kokoro, which has a wide range of meanings.
I see in some of the older stuff the use of kokoro and I was not familiar with that term. The phrase later came up in "Budo Training in Aikido." It seems to be used as a general term that describes the unification of mind (intention) and body. Oddly enough, it seems the translation chooses to use this term in addition to spirituality (implying maybe some separation between ki as "intent of the mind" and a spiritual connotation?). I enjoyed hearing more about that concept though; thank you Dr. Goldsbury.
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Old 12-14-2010, 01:27 PM   #117
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

Thank you very much, Prof. Goldsbury, that was very informative!
You said #3 seemed to be the most spiritually inclined definition, but as I was reading #1 it seemed to fit the description too, at least, per my (again, probably fairly weak) understanding of natural religions. Is it supposing some fundemental particle (similar to what the "atom" was theorized to be before we learned it too had parts and just kept the name for convenience) or energy which is in essence, everything?
I definately chose my words poorly when I spoke of "authentic spiritual point[s] of view." I meant to suggest that the usage I described ("source" ki and the de facto kindness which might generally come from it) might be relevant to O Sensei's spirituality as well as what I saw of Graham's sense of it, insofaras O Sensei seemed to also look to Jinja Shinto (not just Omotokyo) as an authority on at least some spiritual matters...again, assuming my understanding isn't too muddled (just muddled enough I hope).
Thanks to everyone for some great food for thought!
Take care,
Matthew
p.s. for any Ice T fans out there: somehow genki has generated a parody of "OG" that keeps running through my head. "O Ki, original Ki-ster!" Of course I am an original keister, so it works on so many wonderful levels.
...eh...it's probably a good thing I can amuse myself so easily...right?

Last edited by mathewjgano : 12-14-2010 at 01:37 PM.

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Old 12-14-2010, 03:08 PM   #118
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

Yes, my friend -- a very useful talent, that...

David Henderson
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Old 12-14-2010, 03:48 PM   #119
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

I just wanted to tell everybody that I feel sorry that in a thread like that supposed to be of kindness, people are getting so aggressive, I include myself when I replayed to the attacks. When I said that ki is kindness I were replying to the content of the thread not the title. I like to apologize if I offended anybody, this is an aikido forum so we might discuss things like adults.
take care all of you
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Old 12-14-2010, 09:08 PM   #120
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

Quote:
George S. Ledyard wrote: View Post
Just as an aside...
No, I do not think that all opinions do deserve respect. The people who hold the opinions deserve respect. When someone throws out an opinion, it's just like posting something on the internet... once it's out there it's "open season".

People have all sorts of "opinions" and they certainly aren't of equal value. Opinions, as one can clearly see on the forums, can be unfounded, poorly articulated, unsustainable rationally, etc. Those opinions are not worthy of respect no matter how well intentioned the person having those opinions might be.

Out of respect for that person, one might attempt to be polite about how one might disabuse said person of his delusional ideas. Peter G is an exemplar of this approach. He is never rude or disrespectful of the person even when he is totally destroying some idiotic opinion.

It's just like our discussions of Aikido on a technical level. Everyone wants to think his or her effort is enough, wishes to be validated for whatever level of effort they can put forth. Everyone wants to feel like his opinion is worth something. But it's really just like ones Aikido... if you want to be "validated" for your Aikido, make your Aikido better. If you want your opinions to be worthy of respect, they need to be well thought out, well articulated, at least semi-rational and sustainable.

Strength in numbers doesn't really help either. Whereas having a number of other folks agree with ones unfounded suppositions may give one a sense of community, it doesn't make the opinion expressed any better. The "fifty million Elvis fans can't be wrong" approach is off base. Sure they can be wrong, just look at how we Americans are putting the Right back in power after eight years of getting hosed by the same folks.

On the forums, I expect to see civilized discourse. I realize that our entire culture has gradually been conditioned to look at everything from the standpoint of conflict, everything must be sensationalized and preferably involve screaming at one another... but thankfully, Jun attempts to keep a lid on that.

Too often these discussions devolve quite quickly into personal diatribe. Rather like the old Saturday Night Live "Jane you ignorant slut!" and "Dan you Fascist Pig!". I think that is pretty much wrong headed and it doesn't evince any real understanding of Budo or Aikido on the part of the folks on either side.

Anyway, in terms of the original supposition that Ki has something to do with "kindness", well, just look at this thread. Everyone one here on the forum has "Ki". If they didn't they would be dead. Not everyone on the forum is "kind", therefore, ipso facto, there is no essential connection between "ki" and "kindness". So, an unsustainable opinion, not terribly worthy of respect, but delivered by quite respectable people, who have every right to be respected. I think that one can see the opportunity for the personal practice of "non-attachment" in the Buddhist sense.
Hi George,
May I offer a couple of examples here of answers I have given in this thread and apply them to what you have said here. Firstly on the point of going to the meanings of the japanese before it was translated, which assumes the translator may be wrong. ie: O'Sensei using the word love.

I put it to those debating the issue that the fault more often than not lies with their not understanding the english and has nothing to do with anything else. I've seen this phenomena so many times through helping people who need help with study and they go all complicated and complex and agitated and angry so I take them back to where they started having this 'effect' and invariably find ONE point they didn't understand but thought they did.

This brings me to your view on respect and reminds me of a principle given in shin-shin toitsu Aikido 'Respect your partners Ki'
Every aikidoka who has been aware of this principle and then told me they were respecting their partners Ki but he was resisting or whatever other excuse they used showed me only that they didn't understand either repect, partner or Ki. So I wonder what meaning you have for the word respect?

Here's an example: Respect, regard, two words of similar meaning.Both are to do with consideration for someone or something of recognized worth. So far so good.

Here's the difference:1) Regard implies recognition of worth, with the element of approval or disapproval.
2)Respect implies recognition and esteem of worth with or without liking.

So one could take anyones views or opinions and estimate, judge, consider, debate, qestion with respect. However, as soon as one shows dissapproval or approval for that matter this is no longer respect.

Therefore one can say I respect your opinion but I don't hold in in high regard or I don't regard it as pertinent etc. Thus all opinions deserve respect with or without liking, wether you like it , I like it, the whole world likes it or not. On the other hand it doesn't mean anyone has to agree or disagree with the opinion, it's to be evaluated, considered and then put into context at which point regard enters into it.

One follows the other and then there can posibly be harmony. One replacing the other and there can only be misunderstandings and argument.

These statements given by Aikido Masters in my opinion should be respected rather than disregarded and laughed at. Tohei also said as a principle of Aikido: Relax completely. How many people know what that means or rather THINK they know what that means? ( excuse my use of Tohei Sensei as an example but I use him as he said it in English without the need for a translator)

Thus I point out continuously to fully understand Aikido a person must learn all three aspects of it and I emphasize the spiritual for that's where it all starts making sense. Unfortunately many equate spiritual with mysterious or vague unreal. Many equate it with the mind, a big mistake.

If you try to relax your body physically you would have a hard time. You could use drugs, you could go to sleep, you could have a big meal and sit by a warm fire or you could get a massage. Now if you relaxed your body by using your mind or got taught how to use your mind to relax you may well have some success via hypnosis or various pschological methods but still it's very dependant on other things or other factors. Now if someone taught you to spiritually relax, wow! You would find that your mind and your body joins in and then all three are relaxed, In fact relaxed yet invigorated, bright, expansive. Food for thought?

Lastly, your point of we all have Ki but not all are being kind. O.K. What if Ki is kindness along with love and goodness and all other good energies, does that mean that when you see others not being kind or loving then they have no Ki? I don't see that at all. I say it's not a matter of if they have it, it is purely a matter of why they are not using it and showing it.?

Hope this has at least been interesting, Peace. G.
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Old 12-14-2010, 09:55 PM   #121
niall
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

Quote:
The ki of all creation brings accord between the best points of the physical and spiritual sciences and has none of their demerits. If we human beings can be in a correct relationship with this ki then struggle between people would disappear and peace would prevail in this world.
Quote:
In the past, Martial Arts were mistakenly used to support the seemingly unending killing that characterized Japan's past. Aiki, on the other band, is to save human life. Put another way, Aiki is the way of preventing injury to others. Respect for human life is the way of Aiki, and this is why the "Ai" of "Aiki" is closely related to another Japanese word "Ai," which means "Love." It is because of this relationship, in fact, that I originally named my own way "Aikido."

This also means that the "Aiki" mentioned by martial arts practitioners of old is fundamentally different in both content and form from what I refer to by "Aiki." I hope that everybody will think carefully about what I am saying here.
Quote:
Budo originates in the divine love which protects everything on the earth.
O Sensei Morihei Ueshiba
http://www.cityaikido.com/osensei-memoirs.pdf


Well that's what O Sensei said. Thanks for the interesting posts, Graham.

we can make our minds so like still water, and so live for a moment with a clearer, perhaps even with a fiercer life
w b yeats


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Old 12-15-2010, 12:46 AM   #122
Upyu
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

This thread is just screaming with Robot Chicken potential...

Ki is Kindness ...with Ueshiba running around saying how the secret lies in ejaculating through a rice paper door

Sorry, couldn't help myself
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Old 12-15-2010, 01:56 AM   #123
CitoMaramba
 
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

Aside from "Angry White Pajamas" is there another source for the quote from Ueshiba Kaiso talking about shoji screens and err, a bodily function ,for ki development?

Inocencio Maramba, MD, MSc
Dangayan Singkaw Aikido Shinzui
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Old 12-15-2010, 01:56 AM   #124
carina reinhardt
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

Thank you Graham for your very instructive post. And Niall thanks for your quotes of O'Sensei.
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Old 12-15-2010, 04:02 AM   #125
Flintstone
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Re: Ki is Kindness.

Please notice that Ueshiba talks about the "ki of the universe" and not about "ki". And anyway that's Ueshiba's interpretation (omoto kyo influenced, no doubt) and is far distant from the common and established (by usage of native speakers) meaning of the kanji "ki".

Stay cool.
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