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Old 08-18-2002, 06:33 PM   #1
wanderingwriath
Location: Chicago
Join Date: Jul 2002
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Who has and who hasn't?

Once more from the rookie.....


OK friends and neighbors, who amongst you have been, are, or plan to be an uchi-deshi? I suppose I'm looking for the why's and wherefore's. I'm looking for answers beyond the obvious friends. Thanx a bunch.
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Old 08-19-2002, 12:01 AM   #2
Ben_t_shodan
Dojo: Aikido Institute of Michigan, Seiwa Dojo
Location: Michigan
Join Date: Jun 2002
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Re: Who has and who hasn't?

Okay, now first I am not a uchi-deshi. But I do live with my Sensei (he is my step dad). dose that count? So it is kind of like an uchi-deshi.

But growing up and living around aikido is much different that going to the dojo two or three times a week. You will notice things and understand parts of aikido that you would other wise not see if you are around Aikido more.

It is a different feeling living with aikido, I would try to be an uchi-deshi if I could.

That is my thoughts, thank you

Ben
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Old 08-19-2002, 01:49 AM   #3
Abasan
Dojo: Aiki Shoshinkan, Aiki Kenkyukai
Join Date: Oct 2001
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Ben,

does your stepdad breath, eat and live aikido? Or is he a sensei in the dojo when the class starts? I personally think that a master of something, lives it every moment of their lives. And being an uchideshi to them was in similar vein. Otherwise, he probably is just your stepdad first and your sensei second. Consequently you are his stepson first and his student second.

Draw strength from stillness. Learn to act without acting. And never underestimate a samurai cat.
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Old 08-19-2002, 03:30 AM   #4
ian
 
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Dojo: University of Ulster, Coleriane
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If you're thinking of becoming an uchideshi I would definately go for it. I was thinking of it several years ago but my situation changed - now I find I'm not able to make that level of commitment and, though it often crosses my mind, I know it will be many years before I get the opportunity again (partly 'cos of other commitments). Also, earlier on in my training I was happy to go pretty much anywhere, whereas now I would be a lot more choosey. Since it will probably effect the aikido for the rest of your life it is best to find someone you really think has alot to teach you, whom you respect, and a dojo which has a friendly atmosphere in which you feel you can develop in. (some friends of mine have told me that they have been in dojos in Japan that were either very commercial or very unfriendly). And though this may offend many people; if I had a choice now, Japan would not be where I would go.

Ian

---understanding aikido is understanding the training method---
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Old 08-19-2002, 03:56 AM   #5
PeterR
 
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Dojo: Shodokan Honbu (Osaka)
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Quote:
Ian Dodkins (ian) wrote:
(some friends of mine have told me that they have been in dojos in Japan that were either very commercial or very unfriendly). And though this may offend many people; if I had a choice now, Japan would not be where I would go.
Sorry to hear about your friends experience - never happened to me. Of course the Japanese often take a little longer to become best mates than many westerners reallize.

The first thing I ask when someone mentions how much they want to be uchideshi is how much experience they have. Usually it's less than two, often less than one. I think that one is best served by doing Aikido for a bit and then visiting the dojo for extended times before making the committ. My shihan's deshi (Shodokan Honbu) are usually san or yondan before they become full time deshi - actually supported by Nariyama. The idea of a hyper enthusiastic beginner taking the postion is well too horrible to ponder. Deshi implies a lot of responsibility including a teaching load.

Peter Rehse Shodokan Aikido
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Old 08-19-2002, 04:02 AM   #6
Adam Sorkin
Dojo: Honbu Dojo, Aikido of Madison
Location: Madison, WI
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I train at honbu dojo in Japan almost every day, but I am not an uchideshi. I used to want to be, but now I am not so sure. I am friends with a few of them, though.

I tried training all day, every day for a while (just a few months) -- that's pretty hard. One thing that occurred to me is this: Is my physical body the greatest contribution I can make to aikido? Or the world, for that matter? If not, what do you have to offer the world? Is that something best expressed by becoming an uchideshi? Uchideshi get hurt a lot, and it is (I think) among their responsibilities to uphold the highest standard of aikido. Can your body do that?

I dunno. Try thinking about what it is you want to get out of it -- the WHY of it may be more important than actually doing it. Or maybe not.

Shut up and practice.
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Old 08-19-2002, 04:26 AM   #7
PeterR
 
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Quote:
Adam Sorkin wrote:
I tried training all day, every day for a while (just a few months) -- that's pretty hard.

Uchideshi get hurt a lot, and it is (I think) among their responsibilities to uphold the highest standard of aikido.
Ditto on both points - did the daily training for three months last summer - really hard on the body.

I notice Nara-ken in your tag line - which Honbu? You are relatively close to me.

Peter Rehse Shodokan Aikido
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Old 08-19-2002, 09:20 AM   #8
Ben_t_shodan
Dojo: Aikido Institute of Michigan, Seiwa Dojo
Location: Michigan
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Quote:
ahmad abas (Abasan) wrote:
Ben,

does your stepdad breath, eat and live aikido? Or is he a sensei in the dojo when the class starts? I personally think that a master of something, lives it every moment of their lives. And being an uchideshi to them was in similar vein. Otherwise, he probably is just your stepdad first and your sensei second. Consequently you are his stepson first and his student second.
Yes, he dose eat breath and live aikido. (or that is how I feel anyway) and ironically he was my sensei first, then my step dad. (I have been a student for 13 or 14 years, I have been his stepson for 8)

But i could just be ronge, thank you

ben
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Old 08-19-2002, 02:07 PM   #9
Bronson
 
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Quote:
does your stepdad breath, eat and live aikido?
I also train with Ben's stepfather and would also consider myself a family friend (or maybe I'm just hopefull). I spend a quite a bit of time over to their house and I would completely agree with Ben. Crapo Sensei lives it, all the time. It doesn't hurt that it's an aikido family. His wife and two stepsons both practice as does his daughter and her boyfriend. There is a whole lot of aikido in that house. Then you have people like me who come over and keep them up till all hours of the night talking about it and showing and being shown stuff in the living room...I'm sure that doesn't help
Quote:
Or is he a sensei in the dojo when the class starts? I personally think that a master of something, lives it every moment of their lives.
The funny thing is I was talking with one of my students after class one night and he said pretty much the same thing. He was saying (and I agree)that while people like me, and Ben and the other assistant instructors are a sensei (small "s") while we are teaching. Crapo sensei has moved to another level where he just is Sensei (big "S") all the time. He never demands or even asks that anyone treat him with this type of respect...he just gets it because of his teachings, ability, compassion, and actions both on and off the mat.

I consider myself very lucky to have found him in this little podunk town I live in
Quote:
But i could just be ronge,
You're not Ben....this time. Don't let it go to your head

Bronson

"A pacifist is not really a pacifist if he is unable to make a choice between violence and non-violence. A true pacifist is able to kill or maim in the blink of an eye, but at the moment of impending destruction of the enemy he chooses non-violence."
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Old 08-19-2002, 04:40 PM   #10
wanderingwriath
Location: Chicago
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Thanx crew. That was helpful.
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Old 08-19-2002, 07:48 PM   #11
batemanb
 
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Quote:
Ian Dodkins (ian) wrote:
(some friends of mine have told me that they have been in dojos in Japan that were either very commercial or very unfriendly). And though this may offend many people; if I had a choice now, Japan would not be where I would go.

Ian
Ian,

I also live and train in Japan. I have trained in a number of dojo`s here, three on a regular basis, and have found the Sensei`s and students nothing but friendly. There have been the odd one or two students that remain a little aloof, or appear unfriendly but they really have been in the minority in my experience. I suspect that it may have something to do with language and communication. Ironically, the place that I encountered more unfriendly people than anywhere was the Aikikai Hombu, maybe because of the ammount of people that pass through short term (myself included). Saying that, I did meet some very friendly people there who were great fun to train with.

On balance, I would say that Japan is a fun and enjoyable place to train and worth a visit at least once.

A difficult problem is easily solved by asking yourself the question, "Just how would the Lone Ranger handle this?"
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