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Old 09-01-2009, 11:01 AM   #1
Mike Sigman
Location: Durango, CO
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 4,123
United_States
Offline
Sigman: Europe Oct 09

A couple of people have asked in p.m. about the european workshops this year. I *thought* I already posted it in this forum, but then again my memory doesn't always work too well:

The workshop near Vienna (in Guntramsdorf, to the South of Vienna):

You find all the relevant information at http://8ung.at/ekrudl/is/is.htm,
there is a link Anmeldeformular, which you can download, even if your German
is not so good, you will find the bank account etc.
You will also find a link Pension, Hotel, with places you can stay at, most
people in the past stayed at Pension Ulli; there is also the
Refugium.

Nevertheless some Infos here in English:
3. 4. Oktober 2009 (Sa/So) Saturday about 10 -17, Sunday about 9-15h (as
long as you ask Mike questions ;-))
Guntramsdorf bei Wien, Volksschule Hauptstraße 35
www.guntramsdorf.at <http://www.guntramsdorf.at/> , public transport
(Badner Bahn) directly from Vienna center to across the street from the
training hall.
Also there is a direct bus from the airport to this location.
There are still enough places available, people book late, and the effects
of the economy crisis are uncertain.

If a non refundable prepayment of €40 is received by end of August, the
seminar fee will be reduced to €140, otherwise €160.

The UK workshop information:

When: 10th -- 11th October 2009
Time: 10am - 5pm Saturday, 10am -- 4pm Sunday

Where: Sports Hall, Uplands Community College, Wadhurst.
Wadhurst is on the main London to Hastings rail line.

Cost: One Day : £60.-
Both Days : £105.-
At the door: each day £60.-
Places are limited. To reserve yours, please send a deposit (cheque payable to Andrea Kocache) for £40.- to:

Andrea Kocache
3, Courtlands Place
Church Road
Crowborough TN6 1JJ
East Sussex

Please feel free to e-mail me with any questions you might have:andreakocache@hotmail.com
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Old 10-14-2009, 08:31 AM   #2
jss
Location: Rotterdam
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 459
Netherlands
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Re: Sigman: Europe Oct 09

Short writeup on the Wadhurst seminar:
There are two foot-in-the-door skills for internal training: redirecting forces through the body and conditioning the 'suit' (fascia etc.) to support the body. Both were clearly presented by Mike in a step-by-step fashion. He also showed where the real fun starts: the stuff that you can start to develop if you have those two basic things in place, such as power releases and aiki. So participants got a nice overview of internal skills, as well as sufficient details to start developing them. Mike also took the time to check how everyone was doing (It has to be felt, you know.) and did his best to answer all the questions people could come up with.
Organization was excellent and I met a lot of wonderful people.

tl;dr: Great seminar. Attend one as soon as possible if you're interested in "IT".
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Old 10-16-2009, 02:28 PM   #3
F.S.
Dojo: Dojo du cinquantenaire
Location: Brussels
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 6
Belgium
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Re: Sigman: Europe Oct 09

Listen to Joep, because Joep is right (hi again, Joep).

I am posting on this thread because this thread made me aware of last weekend’s seminar at Wadhurst in the first place. So: thank you, Aikiweb.

Some of the more basic exercises shown by Mike Sigman looked and felt familiar from my aikido training, but Mr. Sigman’s explanations and instructions were much (much!) more coherent, precise and insightful than anything I have ever been taught (and I still think I got lucky with my pretty good aikido teachers...: without them I might never even have been interested in or receptive to this stuff).

And then Mr. Sigman showed and explained many more things, some of which were way beyond what I have ever seen in Aikido.

One of the immediate effects that Mr. Sigman’s instruction had on me, is that I suddenly understood (more or less clearly, of course) some of the things which very competent aikido practitioners had been doing to me, without me understanding at all how they did what they did, before.

On IHTBF: well, yeah, ITHBF. Even after extensive reading up on the subject on Aikiweb and elsewhere, things became a lot clearer to me after attending the seminar.

Perhaps the most important aspect of what I took home from the seminar, was a set of very clear and precise instructions on how to do a number of (solo as well as paired) basic exercises (including some that I was already doing in some way, but often in a hopelessly flawed way) and a general ‘feel’ about how things ought to be done, if I want to make any substantial progress in aikido or whatever you want to call it.

Last edited by F.S. : 10-16-2009 at 02:32 PM.
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Old 10-17-2009, 01:51 PM   #4
Mike Sigman
Location: Durango, CO
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 4,123
United_States
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Re: Sigman: Europe Oct 09

Quote:
Frank Scheppers wrote: View Post
Some of the more basic exercises shown by Mike Sigman looked and felt familiar from my aikido training, but Mr. Sigman's explanations and instructions were much (much!) more coherent, precise and insightful than anything I have ever been taught (and I still think I got lucky with my pretty good aikido teachers...: without them I might never even have been interested in or receptive to this stuff).

And then Mr. Sigman showed and explained many more things, some of which were way beyond what I have ever seen in Aikido.

One of the immediate effects that Mr. Sigman's instruction had on me, is that I suddenly understood (more or less clearly, of course) some of the things which very competent aikido practitioners had been doing to me, without me understanding at all how they did what they did, before.

On IHTBF: well, yeah, ITHBF. Even after extensive reading up on the subject on Aikiweb and elsewhere, things became a lot clearer to me after attending the seminar.

Perhaps the most important aspect of what I took home from the seminar, was a set of very clear and precise instructions on how to do a number of (solo as well as paired) basic exercises (including some that I was already doing in some way, but often in a hopelessly flawed way) and a general ‘feel' about how things ought to be done, if I want to make any substantial progress in aikido or whatever you want to call it.
Thanks for the review, Frank. There are a couple of interesting points about the 3 workshops I did in Europe. Bear in mind that the workshops did a traditional treatment that included how to use the dantien/hara, breathing training, movement training, etc., and that traditional approach is one that Aikido falls completely within, so there is nothing I covered that doesn't fit (ultimately) in Aikido, even though some of the topics may never have been openly discussed or approached exactly with the same training methodology that I use. The hosts at all 3 workshops were Taiji people, but the workshops had Shaolin practitioners, jujutsu practitioners, Aikido practitioners, and so on. "Qi" is universal in the Asian arts; the body skills are also universal and follow an inescapable logic.

Before the first one (only a mini-workshop, mainly for some old friends), one of the hosts read me a list of questions he had and I formulated on the spot a broad-spectrum discussion that would answer all of his questions at once. I continued developing that theme while I was in Europe, but I had my best chance to do the overview in Wadhurst because I wasn't constrained by subtleties of translation like in the other two workshops.

The interesting thing to me was using the first day to make a run from zero straight toward the ideas of utilizing an opponent's forces during and/or prior to the full engagement... but the second day was devoted to a far larger treatment of the body movement and development via breathing, qi, dantien-usage, etc., than I'd normally do. I *think* it was fairly successful, but I'm not through mulling it over.

In a sense, what I did on this trip was a broadview traditional approach to the wholistic "soft" approach to skills development. This approach is different from what I know of the various other approaches to qi/ki/jin/kokyu skills that are being currently addressed (just as each of these other approaches is different from the others, also). Generally speaking, I think the broadview approach will allow people to pick and choose what they want to focus on and will give them an opportunity to see what other approaches have and don't have to offer. As part of watching these skills develop in a number of arts, I think the broadview approach has its merits.

Best.

Mike Sigman
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Old 11-01-2009, 07:56 PM   #5
osaya
 
osaya's Avatar
Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 51
Australia
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Re: Sigman: Europe Oct 09

Quote:
Joep Schuurkes wrote: View Post
Short writeup on the Wadhurst seminar:
There are two foot-in-the-door skills for internal training: redirecting forces through the body and conditioning the 'suit' (fascia etc.) to support the body. Both were clearly presented by Mike in a step-by-step fashion. He also showed where the real fun starts: the stuff that you can start to develop if you have those two basic things in place, such as power releases and aiki. So participants got a nice overview of internal skills, as well as sufficient details to start developing them. Mike also took the time to check how everyone was doing (It has to be felt, you know.) and did his best to answer all the questions people could come up with.
Organization was excellent and I met a lot of wonderful people.

tl;dr: Great seminar. Attend one as soon as possible if you're interested in "IT".
Quote:
Frank Scheppers wrote: View Post
Listen to Joep, because Joep is right (hi again, Joep).

Some of the more basic exercises shown by Mike Sigman looked and felt familiar from my aikido training, but Mr. Sigman's explanations and instructions were much (much!) more coherent, precise and insightful than anything I have ever been taught (and I still think I got lucky with my pretty good aikido teachers...: without them I might never even have been interested in or receptive to this stuff).

And then Mr. Sigman showed and explained many more things, some of which were way beyond what I have ever seen in Aikido.

One of the immediate effects that Mr. Sigman's instruction had on me, is that I suddenly understood (more or less clearly, of course) some of the things which very competent aikido practitioners had been doing to me, without me understanding at all how they did what they did, before.

On IHTBF: well, yeah, ITHBF. Even after extensive reading up on the subject on Aikiweb and elsewhere, things became a lot clearer to me after attending the seminar.

Perhaps the most important aspect of what I took home from the seminar, was a set of very clear and precise instructions on how to do a number of (solo as well as paired) basic exercises (including some that I was already doing in some way, but often in a hopelessly flawed way) and a general ‘feel' about how things ought to be done, if I want to make any substantial progress in aikido or whatever you want to call it.
With reviews like these, it's hard to ignore the urge to attend your sessions. I'm wondering Mike if you are planning to come to the Land Down Under anytime in the near future?
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