Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > Open Discussions

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 09-29-2009, 06:26 PM   #1
Maarten De Queecker
Dojo: Aikikai Gent, Brugse Aikido Vereniging
Location: Bruges
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 139
Belgium
Offline
Re: Persuading with the Sword of Love

Quote:
Drew Gardner wrote: View Post
I much appreciate your ten pence. He is a great example of trying to be overconfident at first, and then coming close to, or at, peace-of-mind. I would actually give you a couple British Pound Sterlings for your post. I only have one on me at the moment, a gift from an English friend. I know I'm swaying off my own topic, but I like it how the English say, "went to university," instead of the American, "went to college." I hope the world comes together sometime, but I also hope that we keep much of our ethnic and national culture. This is the spice of life.

Drew
Completely off-topic, but is there a difference between the BrE University and AmE college? I thought Americans had universities too, and colleges were a level below university.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2009, 07:13 PM   #2
Voitokas
 
Voitokas's Avatar
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 377
United_States
Offline
Re: British "Universities" vs American "Colleges"

In the U.S., colleges grant 4-year undergraduate degrees and sometimes Master's degrees, professional colleges like medical or pharmacy schools will grant specialised degrees, and universities grant undergraduate degrees, Master's degrees, and Doctorates, and may have associated special graduate schools in medicine, etc. attached. There are outliers in naming, like Dartmouth College, which is a university, but for the most part this holds true.

I am not an expert
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2009, 10:40 PM   #3
Hebrew Hammer
 
Hebrew Hammer's Avatar
Dojo: Lava Fitness (The Boxing Club)
Location: San Diego, CA
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 74
United_States
Offline
Re: Persuading with the Sword of Love

Quote:
Maarten De Queecker wrote: View Post
Completely off-topic, but is there a difference between the BrE University and AmE college? I thought Americans had universities too, and colleges were a level below university.
Colleges and Universities are often used interchangeably in the US. We go off to 'college' to attend a state 'university'. We do have lots of smaller local colleges called "community colleges" or 'junior colleges' that offer two year Associates degrees.

Another example: Boston College and Boston University are separate 4 year universities.

Last edited by Hebrew Hammer : 09-29-2009 at 10:45 PM.

Stay Cut,

The Hebrew Hammer
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2009, 11:59 PM   #4
ninjaqutie
 
ninjaqutie's Avatar
Dojo: Searching for a new home
Location: Delaware (<3 still in Oregon!)
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,002
United_States
Offline
Re: British "Universities" vs American "Colleges"

It seems that most colleges are smaller then universites. I went to college for my undergraduate degree at a small, private college (they do associate, bachelor and master degrees) and I went to a small, private though slightly bigger student body-wise university for grad school (they also did bachelor and master programs).

I would say that most people use them interchangeably, but it does seem that universitys are bigger student-wise, have smaler schools within (such as business shcool, med school, etc), offer phd degrees and can also be more focused on research instead of learning. What does wikipedia say?

It should be noted, like previously mentioned that college's aren't necessarily worse then universities. In fact, several colleges are more picky and offer a better education then a university could. It just really depends on the place.

Last edited by ninjaqutie : 09-30-2009 at 12:06 AM.

~Look into the eyes of your opponent & steal his spirit.
~To be a good martial artist is to be good thief; if you want my knowledge, you must take it from me.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2009, 12:58 AM   #5
dps
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 2,300
Offline
Re: British "Universities" vs American "Colleges"

Locally we have Youngstown State University. It is a state funded university. Within the academic structure they have:

Williamson College of Business Administration
College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
College of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
and more. http://www.ysu.edu/sitemap/index.php...llegesSchools/
All on the same campus.

I wonder is this a typical structure for American Universities?
Do British Universities have a similar structure?

David
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2009, 04:12 AM   #6
Mark Freeman
Dojo: Dartington
Location: Devon
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 1,220
United Kingdom
Offline
Re: British "Universities" vs American "Colleges"

Quote:
David Skaggs wrote: View Post
I wonder is this a typical structure for American Universities?
Do British Universities have a similar structure?
Of course, my guess is that the US stucture is based on the GB system

regards,

Mark

Success is having what you want. Happiness is wanting what you have.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2009, 04:51 AM   #7
Voitokas
 
Voitokas's Avatar
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 377
United_States
Offline
Re: British "Universities" vs American "Colleges"

It is typical for a University to have internal colleges, since the US system was based on the British system. Normally U.S. universities have a College of Arts and Sciences, a College of Fine Arts, a College of Agriculture (if a land-grant university, etc.) - and how separate these are depends on the school. I would say, personally, that there is a better undergraduate education to be had at a private college than at a university in the U.S. - but as ninjacutie said, most people use them interchangeably.

I am not an expert
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2009, 08:26 PM   #8
Rob Watson
Location: CA
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 697
United_States
Offline
Re: British "Universities" vs American "Colleges"

Quote:
Jeremy Morrison wrote: View Post
In the U.S., colleges grant 4-year undergraduate degrees and sometimes Master's degrees, professional colleges like medical or pharmacy schools will grant specialised degrees, and universities grant undergraduate degrees, Master's degrees, and Doctorates, and may have associated special graduate schools in medicine, etc. attached. There are outliers in naming, like Dartmouth College, which is a university, but for the most part this holds true.
San Francisco State University does grant masters degrees in many subjects and a PhD only in education. Kind of a mixed bag. I suspect the distinction mentioned above is not quite true in many cases.

I think it is true that most community colleges do only offer 2 years associate degrees as well as vocational apprecticeships but no bachleors or higher degrees.

There are plenty of colleges that offer higher degrees. Kind of jumbled.

Funny thing in california there is the CSU (california state university system) and the UC (university of california system) that are both state run institutions but one certainly does not want to mix UCSF with USF nor SFSU because someone might get hurt.

Arguably if there is an modelling after the british system then william and mary college (the US first institution of higher learning) would bear the closest relationship. It certainly offers graduate degrees and has associated institutes and schools (as in institue of marine biology) as oppsed to a constellation of colleges like the university system. Still kind of murky.

You know us americans like to go our seperate ways so each state is different and even counties within a given state can have wildly different rules, regs and laws. Pretty jumbled situation.

"In my opinion, the time of spreading aikido to the world is finished; now we have to focus on quality." Yamada Yoshimitsu

Ultracrepidarianism ... don't.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2009, 04:16 AM   #9
Michael Douglas
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 434
United Kingdom
Offline
Re: British "Universities" vs American "Colleges"

In England the two words are used interchangeably ... UNLESS we are trying to be specific.
Recently a load of scummy poly's changed name to unis ... but we REAL uni grads sneer on them.
They are both 'college' though.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2009, 11:27 AM   #10
Basia Halliop
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 711
Canada
Offline
Re: British "Universities" vs American "Colleges"

Yeah, I always used to find that confusing in american TV and stuff. Where I come from, there are universities, and there are colleges, and they are two completely separate and different things. If you are going to college, you get certain kinds of diplomas (e.g., you could train to be a police officer, a tradesperson, a haridresser, you could do a program in hospitality or culinary arts). If you're going to university, it means you're taking courses towards a Bachelor or Masters or PhD in something (usually a bachelor as that's where most people stop).

So here you wouldn't say 'I'm going off to college' or "I'm a college student", unless you're going to college.

I think an "Associate's degree" must be a US thing too? I had never heard of one until I heard an American mention it. I doubt many people would know what it meant if you told them you had one.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2009, 11:53 AM   #11
Kevin Leavitt
 
Kevin Leavitt's Avatar
Dojo: Team Combat USA
Location: Olympia, Washington
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 4,376
United_States
Offline
Re: British "Universities" vs American "Colleges"

It is the College OF William and Mary and they still maintain ties with Britian based on their heritage. The Queen has visited it several times.

http://web.wm.edu/hermajesty/history.php

My wife is a graduate!

  Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2009, 02:35 PM   #12
David Maidment
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 149
United Kingdom
Offline
Re: British "Universities" vs American "Colleges"

Around here, 'college' is where you get your A-Levels and 'university' is where you get your bachelors/masters degree (plus anything post-grad).

"Never escalate a battle unless forced to do so by your enemy" - Zordon
  Reply With Quote

Please visit our sponsor:

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!



Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Latin American Club Family Semminar In Maceio-brazil joacir Seminars 0 09-21-2009 06:22 PM
British 8th dan? Demetrio Cereijo General 70 06-22-2006 12:19 PM
50 glorious years of British Aikido David Humm Seminars 4 05-07-2005 06:54 AM
North American aikido Unregistered Anonymous 1 09-12-2002 03:30 PM
Calling all British Aikidoists David Humm General 0 01-24-2002 11:30 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:27 AM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2017 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2017 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate