Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > Training

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 01-10-2009, 04:36 AM   #1
kalmen
Dojo: Canberra
Location: Canberra
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 22
Australia
Offline
Love training, and I have a heavy build and joint issues.

I'm writing this post to in hope that others who have similar conditions to me would share their experiences and the things they did to overcome certain obstacles.

I'm a pretty heavy guy, I started off weighing 155kg (approx 310lb) and I have reduced it to 140kg (approx 280lb) through moderate diet and exercise, which includes walking when I'm not training. My height is about 183cm (6ft 1in) and my target is to reduce my weight to 100kg (200lb).

My Sensei is very understanding and whenever I feel I've reached a limit to what a joint has reached, I stop and sit down, he also asks me to do the same.

In August, I hurt my shoulder (which was dislocated 15 years ago), which wasn't major, and I went to a holistic practitioner, who put me off training for six weeks, and series of massages and yogic exercises, which brought me back to balance, but missing the training was awefull, what I missed most about it is the flow of energy, and the confidence and the energy I had, I couldn't imagine doing that again.

Now, I've hurt my knee (when I say hurt, I don't mean debilitating pain, just a discomfort), and in specific, my patella, and I attended two classes wearing special patella/knee support, then I went to a specialist, who said I had a minor abrasion and its nothing to worry about, then recommended one week rest and anti-inflammatory drugs and pain killers.

I want to know I can do something at home to help the healing process, like a warm pack, or a hot patch, or if there are any devices in the market that use ultra sound to stimulate healing.

At the moment, I don't do any knee spraining activities, like seweri waza, shikko (knee walking), but I do seiza.

I still don't know how to forward roll, and I try the exercise on extra mats to avoid injury and stop when I feel I've had enough. My Sensei tells me to take all the time I need, but I should take one step at a time.

I take knee support supplements (for a year now) Glucasomin, Chondroitin and MSM (I read the infamous thread: http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=3686) which I believe have made a difference.

When I first got the pain in my knees, I put a cold pack, but I kept doing it for one week, then I realized I should only do it the first time and then use warm packs afterward. Any help on this would be appreciated.

I'd really like to hear your insights, opinions, ideas, suggestions, experiences, in hope that I could also benefit.

Aikido to me is more than physical exercise, and I want to do it for as long as I live, so I want to do it safe and I want to do it right.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2009, 02:13 PM   #2
James Wyatt
Dojo: Budokwai
Location: London
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 33
United Kingdom
Offline
Re: Love training, and I have a heavy build and joint issues.

Welcome and perservere with the training. I am 6ft 5 and of big build and have been training for 14 years and initially had various aches and pains. I would agree with your sensei just do as much as you are comfortable with and take it slow and easy. You are in it for the long term.

I would recommend hatha yoga which is gentle and will help increase your flexibility (it was of great help to me and I went for a year). If you do not have access to a good yoga centre just try gentle stretching every day. Resting your joints and muscles is equally important as it allows your body to adapt.

Good luck
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2009, 02:23 PM   #3
SeiserL
 
SeiserL's Avatar
Dojo: Roswell Budokan, Kyushinkan Dojo, Aikido World Alliance
Location: Roswell, GA USA
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 3,715
United_States
Offline
Re: Love training, and I have a heavy build and joint issues.

Welcome from another big guy.

Train relaxed and train wisely.

Lynn Seiser PhD
Yondan Aikido & FMA/JKD
We do not rise to the level of our expectations, but fall to the level of our training. Train well. KWATZ!
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2009, 06:25 PM   #4
lbb
Location: Massachusetts
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 2,806
United_States
Offline
Re: Love training, and I have a heavy build and joint issues.

Hi Mohammad,

I believe in the "shotgun method" for dealing with injuries: try several things that (generally speaking) help with this type of injury, and hopefully one or more will hit the target. The standard RICE prescription -- rest, ice, anti-inflammatory, elevation -- is an example of that. In addition, I like to add one or more Chinese patent medicines. I don't know if you can get any of these in Dubai, but I'm quite fond of Wu Yang plasters, which do a good job at reducing inflammation. Tiger Balm, Kwan Loong oil, Taoist healing oil are also good topical remedies -- they don't do as good a job on the inflammation as the plasters, but they are more comforting on minor muscle aches. Yunnan baiyao is a Chinese patent medicine formula that's sold in various topical preparations (plasters and liniments) and also in a capsule form to be taken internally -- it's good for trauma of all sorts.

All of these things can help, but none of it is a magic bullet. The real key is to learn to listen to your body, to sense not just the severity but also the nature of the injury, and to know what stage it's at. Some kinds of pain mean, "I'm really aggravated and I do not want to be used now," others mean, "I'm cranky because I'm all stiff and I need gentle motion," some say, "I want ice," others say, "I want heat". Unfortunately, the only way to learn your body's signals is through painful experience. Listen to your body's signals, try different things, see what changes. Over time, you can develop self-care skills that will help you avoid many injuries and effectively treat the ones you have.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2009, 07:22 AM   #5
Tony Wagstaffe
Location: Winchester
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 1,211
United Kingdom
Offline
Re: Love training, and I have a heavy build and joint issues.

Well done in losing the excess feller..... keep doing so and that will ease the stress on your joints..... just listen and don't kill yourself.....
Improve your muscle tissue with either light weight training and/or a mixture of isotonic/isometric exercise and light weights..... when your joint issue is ok train squats gradually until you can do 100 with comfort....never rush it and start with what you can do comfortably...... add a little more each time.

At 55 still do this regularly with fast walking for aerobic exercise or a bicycle if you have one....

Do whats reasonable....

Tony
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2009, 10:09 AM   #6
Misogi-no-Gyo
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 498
Offline
Re: Love training, and I have a heavy build and joint issues.

Quote:
Mohammad Ahmad wrote:
I'm a pretty heavy guy, I started off weighing 155kg (approx 310lb) and I have reduced it to 140kg (approx 280lb) through moderate diet and exercise, which includes walking when I'm not training. My height is about 183cm (6ft 1in) and my target is to reduce my weight to 100kg (200lb).
While weight loss is an important goal, focusing on a number can be disheartening and empty over time. Rather, focus on transforming your daily routine to promote permanent change to a healthy lifestyle.

Quote:
Mohammad Ahmad wrote:
In August, I hurt my shoulder (which was dislocated 15 years ago), which wasn't major, and I went to a holistic practitioner, who put me off training for six weeks, and series of massages and yogic exercises, which brought me back to balance, but missing the training was awful, what I missed most about it is the flow of energy, and the confidence and the energy I had, I couldn't imagine doing that again.
In my experience more often injuries occur off the mat, as a higher level of intention and a focus on safety tend to coincide with martial arts training. I have found that more students injure themselves playing a pickup basketball game or over applying themselves at an yoga class devoid of spiritual content... You do the math

Quote:
Mohammad Ahmad wrote:
Now, I've hurt my knee (when I say hurt, I don't mean debilitating pain, just a discomfort), and in specific, my patella, and I attended two classes wearing special patella/knee support, then I went to a specialist, who said I had a minor abrasion and its nothing to worry about, then recommended one week rest and anti-inflammatory drugs and pain killers.
Drugs merely mask issues and can lead to horrible side effects. My own experience in over consumption of pain relievers was to horribly thin out my blood which leads to other problems altogether. More natural remedies (see below) along with changing the way you train when both healthy and injured will go a long way towards a less damaging training regimen.

Quote:
Mohammad Ahmad wrote:
I want to know I can do something at home to help the healing process, like a warm pack, or a hot patch, or if there are any devices in the market that use ultra sound to stimulate healing.
Don't waste your time and money on quick fixes.

Quote:
Mohammad Ahmad wrote:
At the moment, I don't do any knee spraining activities, like seweri waza, shikko (knee walking), but I do seiza.
Unless you are Japanese, or training in Japan, seiza should be avoided at all costs at your current size and medical concerns.

Quote:
Mohammad Ahmad wrote:
I take knee support supplements (for a year now) Glucasomin, Chondroitin and MSM (I read the infamous thread: http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=3686) which I believe have made a difference.
Not that it matters, but outside of anecdotal evidence to the contrary, recent studies have shown that the above mentioned OTC products are of little to no use. Moreover, unless taken in a liquid form the long-term use of other forms of these products has a substantially negative impact on other body systems and functions and can lead to kidney and liver disorders and disease.

Quote:
Mohammad Ahmad wrote:
When I first got the pain in my knees, I put a cold pack, but I kept doing it for one week, then I realized I should only do it the first time and then use warm packs afterward. Any help on this would be appreciated.
Try these websites for the appropriate treatments

http://www.goodhealthinfo.net/mdr/home_remedies.htm

http://www.imss.macrobiotic.net/home...#anchor3352697

Quote:
Mohammad Ahmad wrote:
Aikido to me is more than physical exercise, and I want to do it for as long as I live, so I want to do it safe and I want to do it right.
What you believe to be right today you will find was wrong tomorrow. so just take one day at a time.

.

I no longer participate in or read the discussion forums here on AikiWeb due to the unfair and uneven treatment of people by the owner/administrator.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2009, 10:43 AM   #7
Michael Douglas
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 402
United Kingdom
Offline
Re: Love training, and I have a heavy build and joint issues.

Quote:
Shaun Ravens wrote: View Post
...Try these websites for the appropriate treatments

http://www.goodhealthinfo.net/mdr/home_remedies.htm
.
Thanks for the links Shaun, I'm intrigued by this recipe from your first link ;
Quote:
Carp Plaster

Reduces high fever, as in the case of pneumonia. Crush and mash a whole, live carp and mix with a small amount of whole-wheat flour. Spread this mixture onto oiled paper and apply to the chest. When treating pneumonia, drink 1 or 2 teaspoons of carp blood, only in the case where the carp has just been killed. Take the body temperature every half hour, and immediately remove the carp plaster when the temperature reaches normal.
Surely not a whole, LIVE carp! : Kill it first, employ the services of a Priest.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2009, 10:52 AM   #8
Misogi-no-Gyo
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 498
Offline
Re: Love training, and I have a heavy build and joint issues.

Quote:
Michael Douglas wrote: View Post
Thanks for the links Shaun, I'm intrigued by this recipe from your first link ;

Surely not a whole, LIVE carp! : Kill it first, employ the services of a Priest.
I meant to add a caveat to my previous post that I do not endorse any particular macrobiotic website, nor the recipes or applications of any remedies found on any particular website outside of the care of specific advanced teachers of macrobiotics... However, they are interesting points of study from which to begin one's own study and practice of macrobiotic healing methods and practices.

.

I no longer participate in or read the discussion forums here on AikiWeb due to the unfair and uneven treatment of people by the owner/administrator.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2009, 12:27 PM   #9
kalmen
Dojo: Canberra
Location: Canberra
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 22
Australia
Offline
Re: Love training, and I have a heavy build and joint issues.

Thanks James, that is a lot of support reading your post. I do have access to a great South Indian Vedic Doctor who has taught me a some good Asanas and Yogic exercises.

I do listen to my body, and I also get my bokken with me, and whenever I feel slight pain starting in my knee, or any other place, I spend the rest of the class practicing bokken strikes.

Thanks for your post. I appreciate it.

Mohammad

Quote:
James Wyatt wrote: View Post
Welcome and perservere with the training. I am 6ft 5 and of big build and have been training for 14 years and initially had various aches and pains. I would agree with your sensei just do as much as you are comfortable with and take it slow and easy. You are in it for the long term.

I would recommend hatha yoga which is gentle and will help increase your flexibility (it was of great help to me and I went for a year). If you do not have access to a good yoga centre just try gentle stretching every day. Resting your joints and muscles is equally important as it allows your body to adapt.

Good luck
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2009, 12:29 PM   #10
kalmen
Dojo: Canberra
Location: Canberra
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 22
Australia
Offline
Re: Love training, and I have a heavy build and joint issues.

And a Salut to you Lynn, thank you. I will indeed train wisely. There is no rush as I'm in it for the long run.

Quote:
Lynn Seiser wrote: View Post
Welcome from another big guy.

Train relaxed and train wisely.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2009, 12:36 PM   #11
kalmen
Dojo: Canberra
Location: Canberra
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 22
Australia
Offline
Re: Love training, and I have a heavy build and joint issues.

Great post, thanks Mary. I have come to realize that I need to attack from all angles. I'm grateful (through experience) that I am careful about what my body tells me and never push more than I can.

I have heard about tiger balm and I use a different kind of medicated plasters.

I'm knew to ICE and I was told by my doctor that I should apply it within 48 hours only, then I should use hot... I'm playing with that and that works well.

I will look into the Chinese medicines that you referred to, and will look into them, because frankly, my stomach is telling me to stop the anti inflammatory drugs.

Quote:
Mary Malmros wrote: View Post
Hi Mohammad,

I believe in the "shotgun method" for dealing with injuries: try several things that (generally speaking) help with this type of injury, and hopefully one or more will hit the target. The standard RICE prescription -- rest, ice, anti-inflammatory, elevation -- is an example of that. In addition, I like to add one or more Chinese patent medicines. I don't know if you can get any of these in Dubai, but I'm quite fond of Wu Yang plasters, which do a good job at reducing inflammation. Tiger Balm, Kwan Loong oil, Taoist healing oil are also good topical remedies -- they don't do as good a job on the inflammation as the plasters, but they are more comforting on minor muscle aches. Yunnan baiyao is a Chinese patent medicine formula that's sold in various topical preparations (plasters and liniments) and also in a capsule form to be taken internally -- it's good for trauma of all sorts.

All of these things can help, but none of it is a magic bullet. The real key is to learn to listen to your body, to sense not just the severity but also the nature of the injury, and to know what stage it's at. Some kinds of pain mean, "I'm really aggravated and I do not want to be used now," others mean, "I'm cranky because I'm all stiff and I need gentle motion," some say, "I want ice," others say, "I want heat". Unfortunately, the only way to learn your body's signals is through painful experience. Listen to your body's signals, try different things, see what changes. Over time, you can develop self-care skills that will help you avoid many injuries and effectively treat the ones you have.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2009, 12:44 PM   #12
kalmen
Dojo: Canberra
Location: Canberra
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 22
Australia
Offline
Re: Love training, and I have a heavy build and joint issues.

Hi Shaun,

I found your feedback to be very valuable. I loved the links you sent me on home remedies and I have been using the salt pach and the salts baths.

I'll take your advice regarding the supplements more seriously, and regarding sieza.

Many thanks to you.

Quote:
Shaun Ravens wrote: View Post
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2009, 01:07 PM   #13
lbb
Location: Massachusetts
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 2,806
United_States
Offline
Re: Love training, and I have a heavy build and joint issues.

Quote:
Mohammad Ahmad wrote: View Post
I will look into the Chinese medicines that you referred to, and will look into them, because frankly, my stomach is telling me to stop the anti inflammatory drugs.
I assume the anti-inflammatories you've been taking are something like ibuprofin, acetominophren or aspirin? Or is it something stronger? You might want to try turmeric -- that's right, the spice turmeric. It's a really great anti-inflammatory, as effective as NSAIDs or more so, without the side effects (except that it may have a blood-thinning effect -- that hasn't been established yet). I take it daily, in tablet form, to manage rheumatoid arthritis, and I also take it if I tweak something. You can't overdo it (although if you take a large amount, you may feel a little flushed) and it really works well.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2009, 07:16 PM   #14
Janet Rosen
  AikiWeb Forums Contributing Member
 
Janet Rosen's Avatar
Location: Left Coast
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 3,943
Offline
Re: Love training, and I have a heavy build and joint issues.

It sounds like you are taking good care already. When soft tissue is damaged, there is a 6 to 8 wk healing time based on things going on at the cellular level; my understanding is that it is easy to mess up and redamage (and make acute injuries into chronic ones) but not much way to speed the healing - things like RICE, etc are good for healing but simply create an optimal healing environment during the above time period. In terms of ice vs heat: the usual rule of thumb is ice to an acute injury during the first three days PLUS whenever swelling recurs; heat to spasmed muscles and to chronic injuries. For things like arthritis and the intermediate healing period, mostly the advice now seems to be: whichever feels better to you.

Janet Rosen
http://www.zanshinart.com
"peace will enter when hate is gone"--percy mayfield
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2009, 07:18 PM   #15
Janet Rosen
  AikiWeb Forums Contributing Member
 
Janet Rosen's Avatar
Location: Left Coast
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 3,943
Offline
Re: Love training, and I have a heavy build and joint issues.

Quote:
Mary Malmros wrote: View Post
I assume the anti-inflammatories you've been taking are something like ibuprofin, acetominophren or aspirin?
Acetaminophen is NOT an antiinflammatory.
I've also heard good things about using turmeric as an anti-inflammatory but, while I cook with it a lot, haven't used it specifically for that. Mary, any details about amounts?

Janet Rosen
http://www.zanshinart.com
"peace will enter when hate is gone"--percy mayfield
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2009, 08:06 PM   #16
Erick Mead
 
Erick Mead's Avatar
Dojo: Big Green Drum (W. Florida Aikikai)
Location: West Florida
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 2,500
United_States
Offline
Re: Love training, and I have a heavy build and joint issues.

Quote:
Janet Rosen wrote: View Post
Acetaminophen is NOT an antiinflammatory.
I've also heard good things about using turmeric as an anti-inflammatory but, while I cook with it a lot, haven't used it specifically for that. Mary, any details about amounts?
Everyone should take care with ibuprofen and other NSAIDS other than for just muscular ache or transient inflammation. For acute injury it is very effective, but chronic use may be counterproductive. There are a number of studies over the last few years that show that these drugs slow healing of connective tissues such as tendons and cartilage (cox-2 inhibitors are even worse).

I stopped with semi-regular ibuprofen and went on Glucosamine and my twingy shoulder is much better now. Everyone over forty who does serious physically stressful work or exercise should seriously consider regular glucosamine. We stop making it (it is the nutrient used to grow new cartilage on the ends of growing bone in children and young adults) and so healing of those types of tissues is much slower unless you have supplements for what the fully adult body no longer produces.

Zinc is also very important for healing (and metabolism and immune function) and most people these days tend to be zinc deficient (that's mainly why zinc-based cold remedies work -- they provide in situ supplements for what the cells are systemically lacking).

Cordially,

Erick Mead
一隻狗可久里馬房但他也不是馬的.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2009, 10:23 PM   #17
Voitokas
 
Voitokas's Avatar
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 377
United_States
Offline
Re: Love training, and I have a heavy build and joint issues.

Quote:
Mary wrote:
...You might want to try turmeric -- that's right, the spice turmeric. It's a really great anti-inflammatory...
Quote:
Erick wrote:
...There are a number of studies over the last few years that show that these drugs slow healing of connective tissues such as tendons and cartilage (cox-2 inhibitors are even worse)...
I think that part of how the curcuminoids in turmeric work is by inhibiting Cox-2 (which, as Erick pointed out, has been shown to be important in healing) - something to think about, anyway, while perusing those colourful supplements in the health food store ...
Train safely and have fun! I'd bet that taking it easy and respecting the limits of your body at first will pay off in the long run with increased strength, stamina, and flexibility.

I am not an expert
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2009, 12:29 AM   #18
kalmen
Dojo: Canberra
Location: Canberra
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 22
Australia
Offline
Re: Love training, and I have a heavy build and joint issues.

Yes, I do, and sometimes I take stronger stuff.

I'm really glad you pointed out turmeric, because I've always heard about it but never gave it a try, now it will. Thanks for that.

Quote:
Mary Malmros wrote: View Post
I assume the anti-inflammatories you've been taking are something like ibuprofin, acetominophren or aspirin? Or is it something stronger? You might want to try turmeric -- that's right, the spice turmeric. It's a really great anti-inflammatory, as effective as NSAIDs or more so, without the side effects (except that it may have a blood-thinning effect -- that hasn't been established yet). I take it daily, in tablet form, to manage rheumatoid arthritis, and I also take it if I tweak something. You can't overdo it (although if you take a large amount, you may feel a little flushed) and it really works well.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2009, 12:52 AM   #19
kalmen
Dojo: Canberra
Location: Canberra
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 22
Australia
Offline
Re: Love training, and I have a heavy build and joint issues.

I am pretty cautious, because I know the limitations of my body and I want to enjoy training because it does me more than just the movement.

I made a mistake with RICE when I applied ice for a whole week, and the pain increased, so I started heat and that did me better.

Practicing Aikido has helped me a lot to learn about how to manage my health and how to find workarounds for common pain killers and pharmaceuticals.

Quote:
Janet Rosen wrote: View Post
It sounds like you are taking good care already. When soft tissue is damaged, there is a 6 to 8 wk healing time based on things going on at the cellular level; my understanding is that it is easy to mess up and redamage (and make acute injuries into chronic ones) but not much way to speed the healing - things like RICE, etc are good for healing but simply create an optimal healing environment during the above time period. In terms of ice vs heat: the usual rule of thumb is ice to an acute injury during the first three days PLUS whenever swelling recurs; heat to spasmed muscles and to chronic injuries. For things like arthritis and the intermediate healing period, mostly the advice now seems to be: whichever feels better to you.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2009, 12:55 AM   #20
kalmen
Dojo: Canberra
Location: Canberra
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 22
Australia
Offline
Re: Love training, and I have a heavy build and joint issues.

This might help, even though it is a commercial product, but it should give you an indication as to the dosage and administration:

http://www.puritan.com/herb-products...apsules-000525

Quote:
Janet Rosen wrote: View Post
Acetaminophen is NOT an antiinflammatory.
I've also heard good things about using turmeric as an anti-inflammatory but, while I cook with it a lot, haven't used it specifically for that. Mary, any details about amounts?
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2009, 01:38 AM   #21
kalmen
Dojo: Canberra
Location: Canberra
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 22
Australia
Offline
Re: Love training, and I have a heavy build and joint issues.

You are right, NSAIDS are terrible on the long run, especially with GI issues.

Medical professionals argue that Glucosamine/Chondroitin/MSM/SAM-e are not cures for these problems, some studies prove them right and some otherwise.

But I choose to supplement with it them as a food supplement, as we may not be getting the necessary nutrients from our food, while still keeping an open mind to updates on their status on health and new products.

A friend of mine eats Lamb and Beef Feet (and oxtail) (he claims they are thoroughly cleaned and edible) and cooks them using a pressure cooker, mainly for the soup but he tells me that he feels his joints are solid for a good two days. I think I'll start with frozen oxtail from our local market... Not into the feet stuff.

Quote:
Erick Mead wrote: View Post
Everyone should take care with ibuprofen and other NSAIDS other than for just muscular ache or transient inflammation. For acute injury it is very effective, but chronic use may be counterproductive. There are a number of studies over the last few years that show that these drugs slow healing of connective tissues such as tendons and cartilage (cox-2 inhibitors are even worse).

I stopped with semi-regular ibuprofen and went on Glucosamine and my twingy shoulder is much better now. Everyone over forty who does serious physically stressful work or exercise should seriously consider regular glucosamine. We stop making it (it is the nutrient used to grow new cartilage on the ends of growing bone in children and young adults) and so healing of those types of tissues is much slower unless you have supplements for what the fully adult body no longer produces.

Zinc is also very important for healing (and metabolism and immune function) and most people these days tend to be zinc deficient (that's mainly why zinc-based cold remedies work -- they provide in situ supplements for what the cells are systemically lacking).
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2009, 07:54 AM   #22
Abasan
Dojo: Aiki Shoshinkan, Aiki Kenkyukai
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 813
Malaysia
Offline
Re: Love training, and I have a heavy build and joint issues.

First off, i would like to cheer you on your perseverance.

Take it from someone who's been at 120kg. Aikido at 75kg is a breeze on the knees and ankles. So the best thing to do is to get your weight down. Proper diet, weight management program, exercise - cardio and weights should get you on the right track.

Meds - not a good idea in the long run. You don't feel the pain doesn't mean there isn't something wrong with your joints.

Aikido in itself should be healing when practiced properly. Try to practice the ki movements more. Misogi, funakogi undo especially.

Draw strength from stillness. Learn to act without acting. And never underestimate a samurai cat.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2009, 12:06 PM   #23
kalmen
Dojo: Canberra
Location: Canberra
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 22
Australia
Offline
Re: Love training, and I have a heavy build and joint issues.

Thanks Jeremy, I'm going to consider turmeric and hopefully the taking it easy will pay off in the long run.

Quote:
Jeremy Morrison wrote: View Post
I think that part of how the curcuminoids in turmeric work is by inhibiting Cox-2 (which, as Erick pointed out, has been shown to be important in healing) - something to think about, anyway, while perusing those colourful supplements in the health food store ...
Train safely and have fun! I'd bet that taking it easy and respecting the limits of your body at first will pay off in the long run with increased strength, stamina, and flexibility.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2009, 12:09 PM   #24
kalmen
Dojo: Canberra
Location: Canberra
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 22
Australia
Offline
Re: Love training, and I have a heavy build and joint issues.

That is very inspiring, well done! Aikido is healing for me already, in many ways, that is. I becoming more flexible and have better fitness as I am, but I will take your advice and I crave to practicing Aikido at a lighter weight, as I can only imagine how ecstatic that would be.

Thanks Ahmad.

Quote:
Ahmad Abas wrote: View Post
First off, i would like to cheer you on your perseverance.

Take it from someone who's been at 120kg. Aikido at 75kg is a breeze on the knees and ankles. So the best thing to do is to get your weight down. Proper diet, weight management program, exercise - cardio and weights should get you on the right track.

Meds - not a good idea in the long run. You don't feel the pain doesn't mean there isn't something wrong with your joints.

Aikido in itself should be healing when practiced properly. Try to practice the ki movements more. Misogi, funakogi undo especially.
  Reply With Quote

Please visit our sponsor:

Budo Bear Patterns - Sewing pattern for Women's (and Men's) dogi.



Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:20 PM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2014 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2014 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate