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Old 09-26-2008, 01:33 PM   #26
Stefan Stenudd
 
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Re: Henka-waza and Keishi-Waza

Quote:
Joe McParland wrote: View Post
If Stefan perfects a technique so that it cannot be reversed, we have to go back to the drawing board
Don't hold your breath

About the timing, I teach my students that kaeshiwaza should be applied at the very moment when tori's movement turns from avoiding the attack into applying the technique - which is the moment when tori can be said to change from defender to attacker. The aikido technique can be described as kind of an attack, so that's the moment it is vulnerable to aikido strategy, i.e. the kaeshiwaza counter technique.
So, when doing kaeshiwaza, one should pretend to be the one attacked.

Maybe that's what you mean, Joe?

When I suggest that there is some way of developing one's aikido technique so that it can't be countered, I mean that it has to be done in a way that makes it impossible for the attacker to pretend to be attacked at some point in it.
Or one has to do the technique very forcefully....

Stefan Stenudd
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Old 09-26-2008, 04:58 PM   #27
Janet Rosen
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Re: Henka-waza and Keishi-Waza

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Stefan Stenudd wrote: View Post
When I suggest that there is some way of developing one's aikido technique so that it can't be countered, I mean that it has to be done in a way that makes it impossible for the attacker to pretend to be attacked at some point in it.
Thanks for saying it better than I could!

Janet Rosen
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Old 09-26-2008, 05:56 PM   #28
Joe McParland
 
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Re: Henka-waza and Keishi-Waza

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Stefan Stenudd wrote: View Post
When I suggest that there is some way of developing one's aikido technique so that it can't be countered, I mean that it has to be done in a way that makes it impossible for the attacker to pretend to be attacked at some point in it.
Well, my initial thought is this: If you don't want the attacker to pretend to be attacked, then either actually attack or actually don't attack---then there is no reason to pretend

Otherwise, it's waza and we do what we have to do, no?

But still, if your adversary in this exercise is as skilled as an uke as he is as a nage---and his skills are integrated, meaning he can move freely between these roles instantaneously and without thought, which is presumably part of kaeshiwaza training---then his response to an atemi (whether real or a feint) need not ever be what you expect.

We train to reach takemusu as nages; should we not do the same as uke?

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Old 09-28-2008, 05:31 AM   #29
Stefan Stenudd
 
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Atemi

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Joe McParland wrote: View Post
But still, if your adversary in this exercise is as skilled as an uke as he is as a nage---and his skills are integrated, meaning he can move freely between these roles instantaneously and without thought, which is presumably part of kaeshiwaza training---then his response to an atemi (whether real or a feint) need not ever be what you expect.
Well, atemi - that's another thing...
A skilled uke would quickly respond to atemi as if it is an attack, simply because it actually is.
What I mean with an aikido technique that does not make uke shift to tori is one so smooth and aiki that uke doesn't even feel threatened by it. An extension of uke's attack energy, not triggering uke to react.

Stefan Stenudd
My aikido website: http://www.stenudd.com/aikido/
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