Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > General

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 07-30-2008, 05:28 PM   #1
JamieG
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 4
United Kingdom
Offline
Lightbulb Thinking about Aikido

Hello this is my first post and I hope it is in the correct section.

I have played competative judo to a reasonable level for a number of years but feel it is time now for me to move on to something more permanent (for me judo is full on and as I'm 40 this year I am ready to begin something new as I have absolutely no interest in coaching kids which apart from masters competitions this would be the next step).

I have an interest in Aikido and from what I am informed there is a very good Yoshinkan club in the next town to me.

A few of questions please.

1. Will my judo gi be suitable for Aikido? (They are Mizuno Eurocomp)
2. From what I understand Aikido in the UK is more adult focussed rather than young person focussed like judo?
3. I have the usual judo player injuries reconstructed ACL (no problems since). Is aikido as hard on the body as judo and is it something to be practiced into the silver years?

Basically I enjoyed my judo a great deal but no longer want to compete, move into coaching or continue picking up injuries that heal a lot slower than they used to - is akido a good next step?

Most people I know who have left the judo mat have taken up golf which just aint me.

Thanks for your time.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2008, 06:50 PM   #2
lifeafter2am
Dojo: Shindai Aikikai
Location: Orlando
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 153
United_States
Offline
Re: Thinking about Aikido

Quote:
Jamie Gargett wrote: View Post
Hello this is my first post and I hope it is in the correct section.

I have played competative judo to a reasonable level for a number of years but feel it is time now for me to move on to something more permanent (for me judo is full on and as I'm 40 this year I am ready to begin something new as I have absolutely no interest in coaching kids which apart from masters competitions this would be the next step).

I have an interest in Aikido and from what I am informed there is a very good Yoshinkan club in the next town to me.

A few of questions please.

1. Will my judo gi be suitable for Aikido? (They are Mizuno Eurocomp)
2. From what I understand Aikido in the UK is more adult focussed rather than young person focussed like judo?
3. I have the usual judo player injuries reconstructed ACL (no problems since). Is aikido as hard on the body as judo and is it something to be practiced into the silver years?

Basically I enjoyed my judo a great deal but no longer want to compete, move into coaching or continue picking up injuries that heal a lot slower than they used to - is akido a good next step?

Most people I know who have left the judo mat have taken up golf which just aint me.

Thanks for your time.
1) I wear a Judo gi, so I don't think it would be a problem.

2) Can't answer that because I don't live in the U.K.

3) There are many a person who practice well into their silver years. There was actually a documentary on Aikido that showed many of the Hombu residents practicing who were well into their 80s. There are also youtube videos of people like Morihiro Saito Sensei Shihan doing demonstrations up to his 70's.

I would personally say that Aikido is probably a good next step, but 1) I am biased, 2) I never trained in Judo (BJJ is probably the closest I got, had a little Judo thrown in), 3) I am still a youngin'.

Good luck in your journey!

P.S. Golf isn't all that bad!

"The mind is everything. What you think you become." - Siddhattha Gotama Buddha
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2008, 08:10 PM   #3
Janet Rosen
  AikiWeb Forums Contributing Member
 
Janet Rosen's Avatar
Location: Left Coast
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 3,951
Offline
Re: Thinking about Aikido

Aikido can be very hard on the knees, we are prone to acl blow outs. If your graft is very stable and you have no pain and no documented osteoarthritis in the knee, then simple focus on good body mechanics and keeping the support muscles strong should be fine. If you've been left with any wear and tear pain or are developing osteoarthritis in the knee, I'd strongly recommend you avoid suwariwaza, doing aikido from a kneeling position, as it places a lot of strain on the joint interior.
Some research here http://www.zanshinart.com/Essays/AikiKnee.html

Janet Rosen
http://www.zanshinart.com
"peace will enter when hate is gone"--percy mayfield
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2008, 08:15 PM   #4
Buck
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 950
United_States
Offline
Re: Thinking about Aikido

Golf will kill you. It is the athletes grave yard. Golf is what you do when your retire from something you can't do anymore. Unless you start with golf. Then your trapped, cause old golfers don't move on, they mulligan -infinite loop- on the 18th hole. I am just kidding. Golf is a great sport I have never played.

I would do Aikido. I think Aikido is very challenging. You may still crave competition. Generally, Aikido doesn't have competition, and there is always exception to the rule, of course. And Aikido is no different. Aikido is very intricate in my opinion, and difficult to do well, and properly. Aikido is something I have been working on doing well. Geez, for people like me it is slow progress with no quick results. And, yea, that is my experience, yours could be different.

Last edited by Buck : 07-30-2008 at 08:20 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2008, 05:33 AM   #5
James Edwards
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 76
United Kingdom
Offline
Re: Thinking about Aikido

Your judo gi should be fine as long as it's white. Most aikido practitioners in the UK use judo gi anyway.

As with your second question it seems that with the aikikai/birankai styles in the UK they are indeed more adult oriented. There are often separate children classes though.

About injuries it's mostly on the knees like Ms. Rosen said. Lots of kneeling and suwari-waza can take a toll after many years. They do say though that if you do your techniques right it should reduce the risk a lot. Another type of injury common with beginners is back injuries but I assume that you are already used to breakfalling and receiving techniques in judo.

Aikido is generally a pretty safe martial arts though you may know that yoshinkan aikido is regarded as one of the hardest styles of aikido as well.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2008, 10:53 AM   #6
JamieG
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 4
United Kingdom
Offline
Re: Thinking about Aikido

Thank you all for your replies and input.

My knees are no worse than any other 40 year old I guess? My ACL graft was excellent and I have had no problems since.(two years ago)

I have blue and white gi (I wasn't planning on wearing the blue ones to an aikido class).

I'm used to taking a fall and the rough and tumble of a contact sport, but as we get older the injuries in judo take a lot longer to heal and you tend to pick up quite a few. Hence the non competative controlled aspect of aikido appeals to me.

The local club is on a summer break for a month now but I have a feeling I will check them out when they return. Its either that or Iaido.

What is aikikai/birankai style please?

Yes I understand Yoshinkan is considered a 'hard' style.
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2008, 01:26 PM   #7
aikispike
Dojo: Yoshinkan
Location: Toronto
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 95
Canada
Offline
Re: Thinking about Aikido

In general I would say aikido is easier on the body, and has less injuries than judo, but we do get injuries. Most injuries in beginners are from poor ukemi and since you are experienced in judo this shouldn't be too much of a problem.

The labels attached to aikido styles can be misleading. I do yoshinkan, and consider my dojo to be fairly robust, but I know others are much 'softer'. Aikikai dojo also have a very diverse range of intensity of training.

Ignore the label - go to the dojo and watch them train. a few times.

Spike

--
Michael Kimeda
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2008, 10:28 PM   #8
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
Offline
Re: Thinking about Aikido

I like what Spike said.

Birenkai is under Chiba Sensei. Aikikai, but known to be quite "robust"...

snicker...

Best,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2008, 03:35 AM   #9
justin
Location: swansea wales
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 249
United Kingdom
Offline
Re: Thinking about Aikido

Howdy, you have quite a big advantage with your judo experience ukemi is one of the biggest fears newbie's have, reference the style of aikido maybe you could go sit in on some classes from different schools as I believe the teacher and his style is going to dictate the pace and force rather than the outline style.

Good luck where ever you end up sure you will have a blast
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2008, 09:35 AM   #10
Daniel Blanco
Dojo: Suffolk Aikikai
Location: Patchogue
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 98
Offline
Re: Thinking about Aikido

I concur with Spike, this art has alot of Judo throws, and off balancing foot work, you will enjoy the workout. I have a lot of respect for Judo,one of my best friends was a Sandan in Judo( RIP) and I learned alot from him, good luck.
  Reply With Quote

Please visit our sponsor:

Handmade Aikido Gifts - Handmade functional ceramic art with aikido themes



Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Why do some people hate Aikido? Guilty Spark General 609 12-29-2010 05:29 AM
Is Aikido effective for police? erogers General 136 07-13-2008 08:00 AM
why focus on internal power Mary Eastland General 175 03-06-2008 02:08 PM
Aikido as External Art -or- Where's the Chewy Center? ChrisMoses Training 130 03-17-2007 04:21 PM
For Ted Ehara - Boundary of your aikido? billybob General 123 12-18-2006 05:52 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:59 PM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2014 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2014 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate