Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > General

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools
Old 02-26-2008, 12:07 PM   #26
jennifer paige smith
 
jennifer paige smith's Avatar
Dojo: Confluence Aiki-Dojo / Santa Cruz Sword Club
Location: Santa Cruz
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,049
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote: View Post
I remember visiting a dojo one time on my travels because I wanted to practice. The technique was a shomenuchi-kokyunage. I attacked my woman partner and as my slow, cautious shomenuchi came down she turned off to the side, turning, and pointed to the mat in front of me. I stood there confused. She became angry (as so many "spiritual" people are wont to do when the world doesn't do what they'd like to make it do) that I wasn't conforming and rolling myself away. I like to think that she had a bit more of the "internal power" that some of the posters are talking about in this thread. But that's not the traditional sense of what it means. Perhaps people should define how the "internal power", the "ki" they're talking about works in an actual technique of Ueshiba's Aikido, so that we can get a baseline definition going of what "internal power" is?

Regards,

Mike Sigman
the word 'magnet' comes to mind.

Last edited by jennifer paige smith : 02-26-2008 at 12:10 PM.

Jennifer Paige Smith
Confluence Aikido Systems
 
Old 02-26-2008, 12:09 PM   #27
Chris Parkerson
Dojo: Academy of the Martial Arts
Location: ohio
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 740
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

Beautiful thoughts Jen,

I have always wondered how misrepresented the word "meek" became in the Christian tradition. The "meek" that Jesus was talking about were not mindless sheep being lead to the slaughter.

They were hard-scrabble farmers, shepherds, fishermen, and street urchins. Their survival skills were honed through a life of overbearing taxation, no social security system and the threat of becoming a slave or gladiator if they fell into the wrong hands.

Yet, they had "overcoming" spirits. They were willing to focus on an internal kung that developed "Shen" or "spirit" rather than just the powers of the lower Dantien. This is the unification that I also practice building.
 
Old 02-26-2008, 12:12 PM   #28
MM
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,996
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

Quote:
William Hazen wrote: View Post
I have met and trained with a few people that have "internal power" in a variety of arts including Aikido....
Just wondering if you'd care to list some of them? I find myself in various places at times and training with any of them would be helpful.

Thanks,
Mark
 
Old 02-26-2008, 12:17 PM   #29
Aikibu
Dojo: West Wind Dojo Santa Monica California
Location: Malibu, California
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,295
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

Quote:
Cady Goldfield wrote: View Post
George,
Internal "guts" and the higher nature are, as I agreed earlier, of great value and weight, but, as I also pointed out, they work on the assumption that others can be swayed through reason and/or emotion, and will yield. In Gandhi's case, the British yielded because they were malleable. Because of their value system, they could be moved. Nazis, on the other hand, were not bound to that morality or value sense, and no amount of passive resistance would work on them. They would just shoot the passive bodies where they lay.
With all due respect Cady Please... Can you use a better logical fallacy that this one? I have heard it a hundred times and no... you can't compare the two anologies at all...

Quote:
In some aspects of life, it is necessary to be physically powerful, because the opponent cannot be reasoned with nor swayed through his values and emotions. That is where the martial arts sphere exists, and why physical power and capability are crucial in Nature.
Again a false choice...It is not the differance between having or not having physical power It is the matter in which one uses it. The choices one makes...O'Sensei created Aikido to align with nature not in opposition to it...How does one "reason" with or "Kiai" a Tsunami?

Quote:
Pleading for and attaining mercy, and the acceptance of one's subordinant position may be a survival strategy, but one must be content with accepting -- rather than forging -- the terms of the "agreement."
This is even stranger...Another thread Topic talks about how Budo prepares you for death...citing your anology how many times did Ghandi plead for mercy or "agree" to "accept a subordinate position"??? and how many Martial Artists do you know can survive being gassed or a bullet in the back of the head?

I agree with George...Internal Power is not the sole domain of the Martial Arts. Jesus died on the cross and look at the result. I wonder what would have happend had he used his internal power to destroy his enemies instead? I have said a hundred times It's takes more courage to love than to hate...for you (as you indirectly suggest) must sometimes put your own life on the line to connect with the "other"... Aikido is one of the few "Martial" Ways I know where I can practice that connection. If one develops internal power to do nothing but to have as a tool to destroy then I would suggest that the same person has allot more to learn about Aiki.

Again Cady my apologies in advance if I am a bit harsh I do enjoy reading your posts and have learned some good things too. So forgive me. You post is part of a conversation that those who would use the politics of fear use to exploit and color the debate about how best to connect with the "other." So hopefully I parsed this right.

WIlliam Hazen

Last edited by Aikibu : 02-26-2008 at 12:31 PM.
 
Old 02-26-2008, 12:30 PM   #30
Cady Goldfield
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 888
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

Quote:
Chris Parkerson wrote: View Post
Beautiful thoughts Jen,

I have always wondered how misrepresented the word "meek" became in the Christian tradition. The "meek" that Jesus was talking about were not mindless sheep being lead to the slaughter.

They were hard-scrabble farmers, shepherds, fishermen, and street urchins. Their survival skills were honed through a life of overbearing taxation, no social security system and the threat of becoming a slave or gladiator if they fell into the wrong hands.

Yet, they had "overcoming" spirits. They were willing to focus on an internal kung that developed "Shen" or "spirit" rather than just the powers of the lower Dantien. This is the unification that I also practice building.
Chris,
"Meek" doesn't necessarily imply "weak," however, the kind of "internal power" you and Jen, and George, are talking about is not the internal power being discussed in the threads that perplexed Mary Eastland and caused her to open this thread.

Turning the other cheek is noble to those who understand the meaning of the gesture, but if the person you are turning it toward intends to kill you, and enjoys the prospect of killing you, he will kill you. Your noble gesture of calm defiance will still result in your death. And if the killer has no morals, nor understanding of the meaning of your gesture, it will have been lost on him. At best, you will have had the satisfaction of making that gesture before you died. Perhaps that would be of sufficient value to you, but wouldn't it be nicer to be able to subdue the would-be killer (maybe even without seriously harming him), and continuing your life on Earth?

William,
The internal power that is discussed in threads about the things Mike, Rob et al.discuss, is a tangible, physical-mechanical process that one trains within one's body. It's "simply" a physical tool that makes the body structurally more stable and able to receive and re-transmit energy from an attacker if one so chooses.

The reason why it causes such a cacophony whenever it hits the forums, is in part because few have been exposed to it and know what it is; because of its controversial presence in Ueshiba's own personal practice of aikido (and how, later in life, he used it to advance his philosophical leanings); and the even more controversial argument advanced by some that it is absent in most present-day aikido, even at the highest levels.

Again, it's not "inner strength" as in personal spirit and moxie, or spiritual strength. It is a basic, physical condition. Additional confusion churns up when the two different things get mixed and discussed together.

Last edited by Cady Goldfield : 02-26-2008 at 12:33 PM.
 
Old 02-26-2008, 12:33 PM   #31
jennifer paige smith
 
jennifer paige smith's Avatar
Dojo: Confluence Aiki-Dojo / Santa Cruz Sword Club
Location: Santa Cruz
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,049
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

Quote:
Cady Goldfield wrote: View Post
Chris,
"Meek" doesn't necessarily imply "weak," however, the kind of "internal power" you and Jen, and George, are talking about is not the internal power being discussed in the threads that perplexed Mary Eastland and caused her to open this thread.

Turning the other cheek is noble to those who understand the meaning of the gesture, but if the person you are turning it toward intends to kill you, and enjoys the prospect of killing you, he will kill you. Your noble gesture of calm defiance will still result in your death. And if the killer has no morals, nor understanding of the meaning of your gesture, it will have been lost on him. At best, you will have had the satisfaction of making that gesture before you died. Perhaps that would be of sufficient value to you, but wouldn't it be nicer to be able to subdue the would-be killer (maybe even without seriously harming him), and continuing your life on Earth?

William,
The internal power that is discussed in threads about the things Mike, Rob et al.discuss, is a tangible, physical-mechanical process that one trains within one's body. It's "simply" a physical tool that makes the body structurally more stable and able to receive and re-transmit energy from an attacker if one so chooses.

The reason why it causes such a cacophony whenever it hits the forums, is in part because few have been exposed to it and know what it is; because of its controversial presence in Ueshiba's own personal practice of aikido (and how, later in life, he used it to advance his philosophical leanings); and the even more controversial argument advanced by some that it is absent in most present-day aikido, even at the highest levels.

Again, it's not "inner strength" as in personal spirit and moxie, or spiritual strength. It is a basic, physical condition.
hmmm

Last edited by jennifer paige smith : 02-26-2008 at 12:40 PM.

Jennifer Paige Smith
Confluence Aikido Systems
 
Old 02-26-2008, 12:34 PM   #32
gdandscompserv
 
gdandscompserv's Avatar
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 1,214
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote: View Post
She became angry (as so many "spiritual" people are wont to do when the world doesn't do what they'd like to make it do) that I wasn't conforming and rolling myself away.
Mike,
Would you please provide a baseline definition of "spiritual?" I envision myself as a spiritual person but I don't ever remember getting angry because someone didn't take a fall for my lousy technique.
 
Old 02-26-2008, 12:39 PM   #33
Aikibu
Dojo: West Wind Dojo Santa Monica California
Location: Malibu, California
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,295
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

Quote:
William Hazen wrote: View Post
Again Cady my apologies in advance if I am a bit harsh I do enjoy reading your posts and have learned some good things too. So forgive me. You post is part of a conversation that those who would use the politics of fear use to exploit and color the debate about how best to connect with the "other." So hopefully I parsed this right.

WIlliam Hazen
Sorry my edit time limit was up before I could give this a proper going over. What I meant to post is

Again Cady my apologies in advance if come across a bit harsh. I do enjoy reading your posts and have learned much from you too. So please forgive me. Your post is a small example of an ongoing dialog I have been having with those who would use the politics of fear to exploit and color the debate about how best to engage with and connect with the "other" in the present world we live in.

Personally I have chosen Aikido to accomplish this task.

Namaste,

William Hazen
 
Old 02-26-2008, 12:40 PM   #34
Chris Parkerson
Dojo: Academy of the Martial Arts
Location: ohio
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 740
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

Unified Internal Power and the Bourne trilogy

I am constantly in awe when I think of my good friend and Judo teacher "Hal" . He was sought out in the 1950's to be in the 10th Special Forces when many of the 10th were comprised by ex-German SS troops inducted to teach the Army how to do it.

Sheep-dipped into the CIA, he survived Easter Europe, Hungary and then had his Bourne Identity experience on a mission to kill Fidel Castro.

He encountered his Bourne Supremacy experience soon after, losing his home, his family, his aeroplane, and everything else he held dear. All he had when I met him in 1992 was his love of Judo/Aikido and his well honed "shen". He would say, "That which does not kill me, makes me stronger." He legally fought the U.S. government to a standstill and did so without spilling blood, even though he obtained several battle scars (bullet wounds and knife cuts) in the process. The U.S. government assessed him as a threat and simply did not fight fairly.

For the rest of his life (he is now 72) he is experiencing a "stand-off" by way of his personal version of the Bourne Ultimatum. Again, he remains unstained by blood.

Hal is the guy that taught this martial arts student about an overcoming life is and what "meek" really means.
 
Old 02-26-2008, 12:40 PM   #35
Cady Goldfield
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 888
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

Quote:
Jennifer Smith wrote: View Post
Sounds the same to me.
 
Old 02-26-2008, 12:43 PM   #36
Cady Goldfield
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 888
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

But William,
This stuff IS aikido! lol!

And it's certainly not about fear or politics, not sure why you see it that way. It's about pragmatism, which comes in handy when you live in the world.
 
Old 02-26-2008, 12:49 PM   #37
Aikibu
Dojo: West Wind Dojo Santa Monica California
Location: Malibu, California
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,295
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

Quote:
Cady Goldfield wrote: View Post
Chris,
William,
The internal power that is discussed in threads about the things Mike, Rob et al.discuss, is a tangible, physical-mechanical process that one trains within one's body. It's "simply" a physical tool that makes the body structurally more stable and able to receive and re-transmit energy from an attacker if one so chooses.

The reason why it causes such a cacophony whenever it hits the forums, is in part because few have been exposed to it and know what it is; because of its controversial presence in Ueshiba's own personal practice of aikido (and how, later in life, he used it to advance his philosophical leanings); and the even more controversial argument advanced by some that it is absent in most present-day aikido, even at the highest levels.

Again, it's not "inner strength" as in personal spirit and moxie, or spiritual strength. It is a basic, physical condition. Additional confusion churns up when the two different things get mixed and discussed together.
I understand Cady and believe me I was not confused. The Martial Way is just one of many "skillfull means" to achieve internal power whereby you can control and retransmit a physical "attack". There are many many others.

Namaste'

William Hazen

Last edited by Aikibu : 02-26-2008 at 12:51 PM.
 
Old 02-26-2008, 12:52 PM   #38
Aikibu
Dojo: West Wind Dojo Santa Monica California
Location: Malibu, California
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,295
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

Quote:
Cady Goldfield wrote: View Post
But William,
This stuff IS aikido! lol!

And it's certainly not about fear or politics, not sure why you see it that way. It's about pragmatism, which comes in handy when you live in the world.
Keep reading.

William Hazen
 
Old 02-26-2008, 12:53 PM   #39
Chris Parkerson
Dojo: Academy of the Martial Arts
Location: ohio
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 740
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

Quote:
The reason why it causes such a cacophony whenever it hits the forums, is in part because few have been exposed to it and know what it is....
I fully support Nei Gung training a la CMA for those who wish to experience it. But if you do it, you may want to read the warning label..

1. Best results come when taken at 3:30 - 4:30 am

2. Few results anticipated if done in the afternoon or late evenings

3. When your body stores enough chi that is breaks through a blockage, aggressive whipping actions may occur via nerve impulses and relaxed limbs while asleep. Make sure you do not hit your significant other or you may develop a lack of "trust" with your sleeping partner.

4. Before you train too deeply with iron palm, determine how many children you may wish to pat on the back.
 
Old 02-26-2008, 01:01 PM   #40
jennifer paige smith
 
jennifer paige smith's Avatar
Dojo: Confluence Aiki-Dojo / Santa Cruz Sword Club
Location: Santa Cruz
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,049
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

Quote:
Chris Parkerson wrote: View Post
I fully support Nei Gung training a la CMA for those who wish to experience it. But if you do it, you may want to read the warning label..

4. Before you train too deeply with iron palm, determine how many children you may wish to pat on the back.
Ha-Ha-Ha-Ha-Ha...that is flippin' great.

Jennifer Paige Smith
Confluence Aikido Systems
 
Old 02-26-2008, 01:01 PM   #41
Aiki1
 
Aiki1's Avatar
Dojo: ACE Aikido
Location: Los Angeles
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 346
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

Quote:
Chris Parkerson wrote: View Post
4. Before you train too deeply with iron palm, determine how many children you may wish to pat on the back.
Hahahaha - very funny Chris.

Going back to George's post - generally, what I see in "Aikido" is the attempt to use "aiki-like techniques" to Dominate another person, thus having an "ego-satisfying" experience = winning over someone else.

I believe that Aikido - without quotes - is not this - that it is, instead - Transforming, or, Transformational. In a particular way. At a Much deeper level.

Last edited by Aiki1 : 02-26-2008 at 01:11 PM.

Larry Novick
Head Instructor
ACE Aikido
 
Old 02-26-2008, 01:06 PM   #42
Lyle Bogin
Dojo: Shin Budo Kai
Location: Manhattan
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 588
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

I think the most interesting aspect of "internal" martial training is the denial of initial reflexive conditioning on the premise that conscious thought should remain embodied within our actions.

In this way our techniques are dictated by a more complete and (hopefully) more "correct" response, even as they approach what appears to be reflexive action.
 
Old 02-26-2008, 01:39 PM   #43
RonRagusa
Location: Massachusetts
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 679
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

Quote:
Cady Goldfield wrote:
The internal power that is discussed in threads about the things Mike, Rob et al.discuss, is a tangible, physical-mechanical process that one trains within one's body. It's "simply" a physical tool that makes the body structurally more stable and able to receive and re-transmit energy from an attacker if one so chooses.
Cady,

I don't know your martial arts background so I won't make any assumptions regarding your familiarity with Aikido training methods and goals. I was taught that Aikido training develops the whole person; the integrated mind/body person. Our training from day one incorporated both waza and Ki development on equal footing, a practice that we continue today.

In Aikido mind(spirit) and body are non-differentiable. Mind and body distinction is learned at an early age and via Aikido training we discover how to reintegrate mind and body. From an Aikido perspective to state that internal power is "simply a physical tool that makes the body structurally more stable and able to receive and re-transmit energy from an attacker if one so chooses" is only partially correct. Development of internal power via Aikido training must by definition strengthen both mind and body since they are two sides of the same coin.

Mike, Rob et al may use training methods and metaphors that differ from those used in, say, Ki Society or other styles of Aikido that emphasize Ki development, but the power being spoken of is the same.

Just for the record, don't confuse training to engender peace in one's own life with the Christian tenet of turn the other cheek. The two are not necessarily synonymous.

Ron
 
Old 02-26-2008, 03:27 PM   #44
Mike Sigman
Location: Durango, CO
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 4,123
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

Quote:
William Hazen wrote: View Post
Your post is a small example of an ongoing dialog I have been having with those who would use the politics of fear to exploit and color the debate about how best to engage with and connect with the "other" in the present world we live in.
Yet Cady didn't make a slam like that to anyone, William. Reminds of the woman who got upset because I didn't see/do what she wanted me to in the Shomenuchi/Kokyunage. Is name-calling not the politics of hate?

So far, I haven't seen a single definition or explanation to back up what anyone means by "internal power".... other than the implication that it means what we want it to mean, it means "the way we do it at our place", and we can assert it's what Ueshiba (or insert your authority-name of choice) wanted us to do.

Regards,

Mike Sigman

Last edited by Mike Sigman : 02-26-2008 at 03:30 PM.
 
Old 02-26-2008, 03:58 PM   #45
John Connolly
Dojo: NYC Icho Ryu
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 80
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

Without the Black Panthers and the Black Muslim movement, Dr. King's peaceful alternative would have been laughed at. The same holds true for Ghandi's peaceful protests as a counterpart to violent insurgency in India.

Dr. King and Ghandi may have been the ultimate examples of non-violence, but they were the other side of the coin, totally co-dependent on the threat of violence by their counterparts for their success.

--------------------------------

I seek internal power, such as that demonstrated by the various greats in CIMA and Daito Ryu, etc (to clarify what I mean by internal power), just as I seek a refinement and strengthening of abilities I've already learned. I want to be strong enough in any encounter so that I have the ability to show mercy AND survive. Without that strength/ability I could be limited to seriously harming my attacker in order to protect myself. Might not be Aikido, straight from O Sensei's concept, but it holds true to my personal ideals.

Plus, learning is fun.
 
Old 02-26-2008, 04:02 PM   #46
Mike Sigman
Location: Durango, CO
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 4,123
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

Shioda and Tohei both considered this form of strength and investment that pays off when you get old, because when your normal strength declines, your ki/kokyu powers don't. This has little to do with some of the implications in the thread.

If your internal power is up to snuff, even closing your fist is done with it. That's worth thinking about.

Regards,

Mike Sigman
 
Old 02-26-2008, 04:17 PM   #47
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

Hey Mike,

It's the implications that get to me...usually without bothering to get a valid point of reference.

Best,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
 
Old 02-26-2008, 04:31 PM   #48
Aikibu
Dojo: West Wind Dojo Santa Monica California
Location: Malibu, California
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,295
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote: View Post
Yet Cady didn't make a slam like that to anyone, William. Reminds of the woman who got upset because I didn't see/do what she wanted me to in the Shomenuchi/Kokyunage. Is name-calling not the politics of hate?

So far, I haven't seen a single definition or explanation to back up what anyone means by "internal power".... other than the implication that it means what we want it to mean, it means "the way we do it at our place", and we can assert it's what Ueshiba (or insert your authority-name of choice) wanted us to do.

Regards,

Mike Sigman
Two things.

Read the quote you spliced out in context to my entire post. I was referring to the tired Gandhi/Nazi Anology Meme not personally attacking him...I noticed you followed up your question by painting me with your own brush aka name calling...

There are plenty of posts and threads referencing the various definitions of Internal Power including some written by you....

I meant no disrespect to anyone and to suggest or infer that I did does not contribute to the discussion at hand.

William Hazen
 
Old 02-26-2008, 04:52 PM   #49
Aikibu
Dojo: West Wind Dojo Santa Monica California
Location: Malibu, California
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,295
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

Quote:
John Connolly wrote: View Post
Without the Black Panthers and the Black Muslim movement, Dr. King's peaceful alternative would have been laughed at. The same holds true for Ghandi's peaceful protests as a counterpart to violent insurgency in India.

Dr. King and Ghandi may have been the ultimate examples of non-violence, but they were the other side of the coin, totally co-dependent on the threat of violence by their counterparts for their success.

--------------------------------
With all due respect John. This part of the thread should be moved don't you think? I would love to dicuss this with you if Jun decides to move or if you opened up a thread on the topic.

For now...I humbly ask you to reread what you wrote and ask you what logical fallacy you represented...

William Hazen
 
Old 02-26-2008, 05:11 PM   #50
John Connolly
Dojo: NYC Icho Ryu
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 80
United_States
Offline
Re: why focus on internal power

I'd be fine with it being moved, if all references previous on the same topic would also be moved. This is not a statement made in a vacuum. I was responding to the previously posted assertions about power, internal or otherwise, intrinsic in pacifism.

 

Please visit our sponsor:

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!



Closed Thread


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What is Weight Transfer(Taijuuidou)?? Upyu Training 87 10-17-2008 11:13 AM
An exercise that illustrates internal power Timothy WK Non-Aikido Martial Traditions 18 11-16-2007 07:52 PM
Internal Power in your Aikido Andrew Prochnow Non-Aikido Martial Traditions 48 04-03-2007 09:18 AM
Aikido as External Art -or- Where's the Chewy Center? ChrisMoses Training 130 03-17-2007 04:21 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:49 AM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2014 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2014 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate