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Old 04-27-2002, 11:17 PM   #26
Edward
Location: Bangkok
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 803
Thailand
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I'm sorry Colleen, but now you are talking in complete contradiction. Any sport or physical activity of any sort entails over-usage of some part of the body, whether you play correctly or not. Especially in Aikido, can you please tell me who has perfect technique? Do you know 2 persons who would agree about the correct execution of a certain technique?

That's why in tennis they get tennis elbows, in soccer, they get knee and ankle problems. In aikido, we get wrists and elbows and knees, mainly. Even in chess, they get headaches. Manipulating a computer mouse will inevitably cause you wrist problems too. The only way you don't get joint problems in aikido is in mitori keiko.

As for the Osensei part, I won't answer to that because I think you misread my post. I never said aikido is not good for the children and elderly.

Last edited by Edward : 04-27-2002 at 11:20 PM.
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Old 04-29-2002, 10:49 AM   #27
jimvance
Dojo: Jiyushinkan
Location: Mesa, AZ
Join Date: Dec 2000
Posts: 199
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Quote:
Originally posted by Edward
...Any sport or physical activity of any sort entails over-usage of some part of the body, whether you play correctly or not.
Not only is this kind of generalization patently false, it implies that whosoever does not follow along is not really training. Come on, we are not in junior high school anymore.
Sure the human body gets over-used, that has nothing to do with injury. How do you think body builders get big muscles? They over-use the muscles; the human body responds by creating bigger ones. The problem is not OVER-use, it is MIS-use. The examples given about tennis, golf, soccer show that within those sports some sort of movement is not being done properly, which over time and with added force cause the joints to fail. They don't fail because they are over-used. Tell that to the 70-something year old man who still does marathons.
I don't train to mis-use my joints or anyone elses. If I came to the dojo with that kind of an attitude, I could not make this a lifelong quest, since I would be too beat up and no one would want to train with me.

A word of advice Edward: Be careful what you offer at the altar of the zealous.

Jim Vance
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Old 04-29-2002, 11:13 AM   #28
Edward
Location: Bangkok
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 803
Thailand
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So you all want to convince me that, aikido techniques, if done correctly, cannot possibly do any damage. Well I agree completely on that. Where do the injuries in aikido come from? Bad or incorrect technique. But who has correct technique, and who can do correct technique continuously without failing. It only takes one false movement, on moment of inattention or lack of concentration and you have an accident. Every one of us aikidoka has a problem in his technique and doesn't seem able to correct it. It's like saying that if you drive correctly, it is impossible to crash your car. That's correct, but then why do we get millions of deadly accidents every year?

I am not sure of the purpose of this thread. It's like you want to state that aikido is safe, but it's the aikidoka who cause the injuries to themselves (by doing aikido).

By the way, having been involved in MA for over 17 years, and that's not much compared to other members of the forum, I can tell you that I have never seen people as afraid and and cautious about their own safety than in aikido. No body likes to be injured, and I don't take pride in getting injured, but I accept that it is a part of practicing MA and it happens occasionally. I really believe that people who manage to NEVER getting injured in aikido are not practicing honestly.
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Old 05-02-2002, 07:25 PM   #29
Arianah
Dojo: Aikido of Norwalk
Location: CT
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 205
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Well, if anyone cares to know, I went to a doctor about my shoulders. He believes that the problem is my rotator cuff, and the physical therapist in the office gave me some strengthening exercises. He didn't seem to think it was anything to really worry about, which I'm relieved about. I was hesitant to mention aikido, because I didn't want to have him tell me to stop practicing, but I ultimately did, and I've not been forbidden to tread on the mat, thankfully.

You know, I never knew that I was abnormally flexible until I started aikido, and since then, it's kept popping up. My doctor was moving my arm around and said, "Well, you've got full range of motion . . . actually, you have an extremely large range of motion. Hmm . . . that may be part of the problem." I hadn't thought of my flexibility as a problem before, but, rather, something that would help me avoid injury. *Shrug* Ow! My shoulder! I'm just kidding (but I swear, my humor isn't always this bad). Sigh.

Sarah

Out of clutter, find simplicity.
From discord, find harmony.
In the middle of difficulty, lies opportunity.
-Albert Einstein
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Old 05-02-2002, 07:57 PM   #30
shadow
Dojo: Aiki Kun Ren (Iwama style)
Location: Sydney
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 166
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hey sarah

I haven't been through and read all the replies cause I'm at uni and don't have time so I apologise if I repeat what anyone else has said.

I never used to notice anything with my shoulders or wrists before I started aikido, but after some time of training, not that long, I began to suffer the same kind of grinding feeling with my joints which was at times even painful. I kept up my training and as time has passed it has pretty much gone away and been replaced by an incredibly satisfying *crack* which happens time to time. This crack feels real great and like the joint has loosened up. I personally think it's just your body getting used to all these extra movements that you have never done, and slowly ironing out the little bumps and stuff that have appeared on your joints from lack of use in the past.

Also, as with you, I never knew I was so flexible until I started aikido also, my legs are not so good though, but my arms.....people often stop the pin before I tap because they are worried about pulling my arm off....and I don't suffer any pain, unless of course they are experienced and they do the cheating nerve pin, that hurts!

take it easy.

happiness. harmony. compassion.
--damien--
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Old 05-02-2002, 11:35 PM   #31
Edward
Location: Bangkok
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 803
Thailand
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Glucosamine?

Hi!

I have a question for the guys using glucosamine successfully. After reading the thread, I decided to give it a try to try to heal my elbow. At a recent seminar. we were doing ude kime nage and someone thought my elbow should be able to open over 180 degrees before he actually threw me. 1 month later, my elbow hasen't healed yet. I started taking 1500 mg of Glucosamine daily since last Sunday. I haven't noticed any improvement with my elbow. Curiously, the chronic grinding and clicking sounds in my neck either almost completely disappeared, or glucosamine is affecting my hearing. The question is, what is usually the treatment duration. I should also mention that I have not stopped my daily training since the accident, even though I do try to manage my elbow.

Cheers,
Edward
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Old 05-03-2002, 06:29 AM   #32
Arianah
Dojo: Aikido of Norwalk
Location: CT
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 205
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Re: Glucosamine?

Quote:
Originally posted by Edward
I started taking 1500 mg of Glucosamine daily since last Sunday. I haven't noticed any improvement with my elbow. Curiously, the chronic grinding and clicking sounds in my neck either almost completely disappeared, or glucosamine is affecting my hearing. The question is, what is usually the treatment duration. I should also mention that I have not stopped my daily training since the accident, even though I do try to manage my elbow.

Cheers,
Edward
I just started taking it, myself. I've often heard that it takes about a month to begin seeing improvement. The bottle I have says that after two months, you can lower your dosage for maintenance, so that should give you some indication.

Sarah

Out of clutter, find simplicity.
From discord, find harmony.
In the middle of difficulty, lies opportunity.
-Albert Einstein
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