Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > General

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 01-23-2008, 11:16 AM   #1
Diane878
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 8
Offline
New Person Training Full Time

Hi! I've always wanted to learn Aikido, but I wanted to finish my schooling first. I have a couple more months and then I'm done.

I've never taken an Aikido class before, so I am completely fresh.

I'm looking to learn from someone who is 7th Dan or higher and am willing to invest 1 to 2 years full time anywhere in the world.

Where do you suggest I train and who would I contact about getting the training?
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2008, 11:45 AM   #2
ChS_23
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 31
Germany
Offline
Wink Re: New Person Training Full Time

Quote:
Diane Lasken wrote: View Post
I'm looking to learn from someone who is 7th Dan or higher and am willing to invest 1 to 2 years full time anywhere in the world.
To get the first 111 "7th Dan or higher" look her:
http://www.aikidofaq.com/cgi-bin/sen...E%3D+x&v%3A1=7

If that's not enough I have at least one more (not listed) who is the sensei of my dojo-cho.

Ask if they have an ushi-deshi program.

---

The rest of the answer to your question will hopefully be done by someone else

Viele Gre
Christian Schnarr
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2008, 12:00 PM   #3
Keith R Lee
Location: Alabama
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 219
United_States
Offline
Re: New Person Training Full Time

http://www.aikiweb.com/links/browselinks.php?c=7

Keith Lee
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2008, 12:53 PM   #4
Diane878
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 8
Offline
Re: New Person Training Full Time

Are there recommended dojos where I can train fulltime, and possibly live while training?
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2008, 01:25 PM   #5
Joseph Madden
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 160
Canada
Offline
Re: New Person Training Full Time

Diane,
If you have the time and money available, the Honbu dojo of the Yoshinkan offers a senshusei course that will take you to instructor level in one year. Go to www.yoshinakn.net for info. Tokyo is a beautiful city and the teachers are some of the best in the world. But then again, I'm prejudiced.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2008, 01:38 PM   #6
Diane878
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 8
Offline
Re: New Person Training Full Time

Quote:
Joseph Madden wrote: View Post
Diane,
If you have the time and money available, the Honbu dojo of the Yoshinkan offers a senshusei course that will take you to instructor level in one year. Go to www.yoshinakn.net for info. Tokyo is a beautiful city and the teachers are some of the best in the world. But then again, I'm prejudiced.
I have the time but not necessarily the money (I'll have ~$3500 to spend available at the end of my schooling)
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2008, 01:40 PM   #7
mathewjgano
 
mathewjgano's Avatar
Dojo: Tsubaki Kannagara Jinja Aikidojo; Himeji Shodokan Dojo
Location: Renton
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 2,086
United_States
Offline
Re: New Person Training Full Time

Quote:
Diane Lasken wrote: View Post
Are there recommended dojos where I can train fulltime, and possibly live while training?
I'm not sure what region you're interested in visiting, but my dojo essentially has an uchideshi position. I'm not sure if there is room for another shrine assistant or not, but at Tsubaki America Jinja the shrine assistants do train in Aikido, and so far as I know, tend to live in the kaikan as well.
I imagine it's not exactly the same as most other Aikido uchideshi positions in that it's a Shinto shrine, but from what I understand (and someone please correct me if I'm wrong) it's pretty similar in nature.
Take care.

Gambarimashyo!
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2008, 01:53 PM   #8
Diane878
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 8
Offline
Re: New Person Training Full Time

Quote:
Matthew Gano wrote: View Post
I'm not sure what region you're interested in visiting, but my dojo essentially has an uchideshi position. I'm not sure if there is room for another shrine assistant or not, but at Tsubaki America Jinja the shrine assistants do train in Aikido, and so far as I know, tend to live in the kaikan as well.
I imagine it's not exactly the same as most other Aikido uchideshi positions in that it's a Shinto shrine, but from what I understand (and someone please correct me if I'm wrong) it's pretty similar in nature.
Take care.
Who would I contact about the possibility of a shrine assistant opening? Is there a fee to train, live, and eat, or is all that provided in exchange for work?
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2008, 02:27 PM   #9
mathewjgano
 
mathewjgano's Avatar
Dojo: Tsubaki Kannagara Jinja Aikidojo; Himeji Shodokan Dojo
Location: Renton
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 2,086
United_States
Offline
Re: New Person Training Full Time

Quote:
Diane Lasken wrote: View Post
Who would I contact about the possibility of a shrine assistant opening? Is there a fee to train, live, and eat, or is all that provided in exchange for work?
I think somewhere on aikiweb there is an ad that was posted (maybe a year or two ago?), but you can visit the web page. Sensei Barrish is the Kannushi.
http://www.tsubakishrine.com/
...I'm not sure about the details though, sorry.
Good luck and Gambatte.

Gambarimashyo!
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2008, 03:13 PM   #10
lbb
Location: Massachusetts
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 2,654
United_States
Offline
Re: New Person Training Full Time

Are you quite sure you want to make such a substantial commitment when you have yet to step onto the mat? Maybe you want to pick up a copy of "Angry White Pyjamas" first. It's not that wanting to study aikido full-time is a bad idea, but I think that making a substantial commitment to something you have no experience in is like buying a lottery ticket: it's pretty much a matter of chance as to whether it will work out or just be money (and time) down the drain).
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2008, 03:17 PM   #11
Diane878
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 8
Offline
Re: New Person Training Full Time

Quote:
Mary Malmros wrote: View Post
Are you quite sure you want to make such a substantial commitment when you have yet to step onto the mat? Maybe you want to pick up a copy of "Angry White Pyjamas" first. It's not that wanting to study aikido full-time is a bad idea, but I think that making a substantial commitment to something you have no experience in is like buying a lottery ticket: it's pretty much a matter of chance as to whether it will work out or just be money (and time) down the drain).
I have researched Aikido for about 2 years. I want to learn from the best and dedicate myself to learning it. I'd prefer to learn outside of North American where I can be around another culture while I learn Aikido.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2008, 03:34 PM   #12
crbateman
  AikiWeb Forums Contributing Member
 
crbateman's Avatar
Location: Orlando, FL
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 1,435
Offline
Re: New Person Training Full Time

Diane, I am sure you will get many excellent recommendations. One suggestion that I would like to make is that you contact Pat Hendricks Sensei at Aikido of San Leandro (CA). In addition to having her own well-regarded uchideschi program, she has participated in the Iwama, Japan uchideshi programs of Morihiro and Hitohiro Saito Sensei for many years. Hendricks Sensei is a wonderful technician and person, and if you are serious about this undertaking (and it certainly sounds like you are), I know she would be only too happy to offer valuable insights into your options, and help you any way she can, as she has walked this very path herself.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2008, 06:02 PM   #13
ChS_23
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 31
Germany
Offline
Thumbs down Re: New Person Training Full Time

Quote:
Joseph Madden wrote: View Post
the Honbu dojo of the Yoshinkan offers a senshusei course that will take you to instructor level in one year.
http://www.yoshinkan.net/images/_pdf...%20Package.pdf
Quote:
Diane Lasken wrote: View Post
I'll have ~$3500 to spend available
lol
Quote:
Clark Bateman wrote: View Post
One suggestion that I would like to make is that you contact Pat Hendricks Sensei
http://www.aikido-sanleandro.com/info.html#uchideshi
Quote:
Diane Lasken wrote: View Post
I'll have ~$3500 to spend available
lol

Last edited by ChS_23 : 01-23-2008 at 06:10 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2008, 06:59 PM   #14
odudog
Dojo: Dale City Aikikai
Location: VA
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 374
Offline
Re: New Person Training Full Time

I would recommend that you first find out what type of Aikido you would like to practice before setting of on this endeavor. Type meaning major style {Aikikai, Iwama, Yoshinkan,etc...} then flavor within the major style. Each sensei has his/her own flavor. You might end up at a place that is very soft for a long time just to find out in the end you would like to practice a hard version. Practicing long hours everyday is very taxing and will be especially so for someone who hasn't step foot on the mat.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2008, 09:34 PM   #15
Diane878
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 8
Offline
Re: New Person Training Full Time

Quote:
Mike Braxton wrote: View Post
I would recommend that you first find out what type of Aikido you would like to practice before setting of on this endeavor. Type meaning major style {Aikikai, Iwama, Yoshinkan,etc...} then flavor within the major style. Each sensei has his/her own flavor. You might end up at a place that is very soft for a long time just to find out in the end you would like to practice a hard version. Practicing long hours everyday is very taxing and will be especially so for someone who hasn't step foot on the mat.
I am interested in Aikido Yoshinkan. Because I will only have around $3500 I am willing to travel and train in a country other than American and Japan.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2008, 05:45 AM   #16
Joe Bowen
 
Joe Bowen's Avatar
Dojo: Yongsan Aikikai
Location: But now I'm in the UK
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 210
South Korea
Offline
Re: New Person Training Full Time

Diane,

It is an admirable ambition to dedicate your life to aikido. I don't know from your posts how old you are nor what type of life experiences you have had to date. Uchideshi programs cost money and invariably the money for the programs come for the uchideshi themselves. Unfortunately in today's world $3500 will not get you very far.

I will also echo what several other folks have recommended here, that you "check out" a class or too before you jump head first of the high dive. While what form of aikido you study is not necessarily a life or death decision, if you are moving to another country on somebody else's dime, you will invariably incur a type of obligation to them and you could be putting yourself in a compromising situation.

While living in South Korea, I had the opportunity to train in Zen Meditation with some Buddhist monks at a temple just south of Taejon. After the meditation there was a Dharma talk and the opportunity to question the abbot of the temple about anything and everything. Most folks asked about specific problems in their lives and one women in particular asked the monk about problems she was experiencing while trying to meditate because people she owed money too would continually hound her to pay them back. The abbot's response was,"why are you meditating? If you owe these people money, get a job and pay them what you owe them,
then, meditate".

The moral of the story leads me to my final advice to you: You need a method or means to obtain some form of income. If you're really interested in living overseas, check out English teaching programs. There are multiple programs at private institutes as well as overseas educational institutions. This will enable you to live abroad and experience some very nice aikido, while making some money.

One more tidbit, many uchideshi programs have recommendation requirements, meaning that someone, usually an aikido someone, has to vouch for you before you are able to be an uchideshi. This would be very hard if you have not trained anywhere beforehand.

So, all told, I encourage you to shoot for the moon and your uchideshi dream with a 7th dan Aikido instructor, but please do it intelligently and with an eye for a bit of self-reliance.

As the great swordsman Musashi Miyamoto wrote, "Respect the gods and Buddhas, but do not rely on them".
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2008, 06:34 AM   #17
AsimHanif
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 478
Offline
Re: New Person Training Full Time

Hi Diane.
You might want to contact NY Aikikai.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2008, 07:44 AM   #18
Randy Sexton
Dojo: Aikido of Lake Keowee
Location: South Carolina
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 187
United_States
Offline
Cool Re: New Person Training Full Time

What I sense here is a plan for disaster. Being "fresh" means I have NO experience in Aikido whatsoever. Wanting to learn from a high ranking sensei (7th Dan) is great but the truth is you will learn from EVERYONE in the dojo and the sensei personal rank is more a thing of your pride than their true value as an instructor. The truth is the sensei instructs and you and your fellow students practice with each other with his guidance and watchful eye. A great deal of your instruction will come from students higher ranking than you (Sempai) and the lower ranking Dan members. The lower ranking Dan students can often be the best source of one-on-one instruction and training for your first years in Aikido. Higher Dan ranking does not necessarily correlate with teaching ability.
High ranking Dan sensei will instruct you personally at times but the overall design of the dojo is to have the lower ranking Dan instructors gain experience in teaching by instructing the Kyu ranks and assuming a sense of responsibility for their growth.
I would recommend finding a good job in your career field you are training for and find a dojo near where you WANT to live, train in Aikido with a local instructor and then if you want to train with other sensei you have some experience. You will learn from other sensei through seminars, reading, the internet, and books. Seminars are one of the great things in Aikido. You can learn from the "Greats" and still support your local dojo. Stop being "fresh" and get sweaty.
IMHO Doc
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2008, 08:19 AM   #19
Ron Tisdale
Dojo: Doshinkan dojo in Roxborough, Pa
Location: Phila. Pa
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,614
United_States
Offline
Re: New Person Training Full Time

I would NOT recommend generally that a person fresh to aikido join the Senshusei course. Just my opinion.

There are 7th dan and higher instructors from the yoshinkan tradition in NA...Utada Sensei, Kimeda Sensei, Kushida Sensei (ex yoshinkan), and non japanese instructors as well (Payet Sensei, Mustard Sensei, Parker Shihan, etc).

Utada Sensei has a house next to the dojo where students often live for extended periods of time, and I'm sure these other instructors have similar arrangements on occation. Personally, I recommend you try one of these arrangements first, then look to going to Japan later, if you still feel the same way.

But some unusual people can dive right in, and I don't know you at all.

Best,
Ron

Ron Tisdale
-----------------------
"The higher a monkey climbs, the more you see of his behind."
St. Bonaventure (ca. 1221-1274)
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2008, 08:33 AM   #20
Mato-san
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 290
Iceland
Offline
Re: New Person Training Full Time

well put Ron

Before you drive or steer your vehicle, you must first start the engine, release the brake and find gear!
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2008, 08:38 AM   #21
Mato-san
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 290
Iceland
Offline
Re: New Person Training Full Time

Senshusei course at this time is a touchy subject... would love to go there but i wish to stay away from it.... if you like being dominated ..go for it!

Before you drive or steer your vehicle, you must first start the engine, release the brake and find gear!
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2008, 09:51 AM   #22
charyuop
Dojo: Ponca Aikikai
Location: Ponca City, Oklahoma
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 130
United_States
Offline
Re: New Person Training Full Time

I might be wrong, but these are not Uchideshi. A Uchideshi is someone who lives and trains with his Sensei 24 hours a day (O Sensei was famous for waking up in the middle of the night and attacking his Uchideshi to check their awareness). A Uchideshi also protect his Sensei (well, probably nowadays no longer need for that). A Uchideshi doesn't really have a personal life. For sure no other job, no school or no training in any other job... I am not sure about sentimental life.
For what I consider to be an Uchideshi the 2 above offers are far far away from being a real Uchideshi system. Above all the one in San Leandro which will charge for everything, even the night classes. Those are schools that offer regular teaching but in addition can give you a place where to sleep at a cheaper rate than sleeping in a rental place.
This is just my opinion, but I wouldn't call those "systems" Uchideshi, but after all as Saotome Shihan said more than once, nowadays it makes no sense of speaking of a Uchideshi System.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2008, 11:16 AM   #23
lbb
Location: Massachusetts
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 2,654
United_States
Offline
Re: New Person Training Full Time

Quote:
Diane Lasken wrote: View Post
I have researched Aikido for about 2 years. I want to learn from the best and dedicate myself to learning it. I'd prefer to learn outside of North American where I can be around another culture while I learn Aikido.
Understood. I don't want to discourage you, but I do want to encourage you to get some knowledge of aikido that isn't abstract before making this kind of commitment. This is because most people who try out aikido, or any martial art, find that it isn't for them. They may practice enthusiastically for a few months, but look at who's still around and training in a year. Answer: not very many. A lot of people come in the dojo door following some idea they've gotten about martial arts training. When they experience the reality, and realize that you don't "get there", you just keep on training day after day and year after year, most lose interest fairly quickly. I'm not criticizing these people, just pointing out that martial arts is a minority taste, and you simply cannot know that it is to your taste through any amount of research, or by any method other than spending some time on the mat. Dedicating yourself to a path in which you have no experience is like buying a used car that you've never seen -- if ditching it six months from now isn't going to bother you, then go right ahead, but otherwise best look more closely and carefully before you leap.

As for learning from the best...I always wonder when beginners say this. I want to learn to play tennis, and I've never picked up a racket -- should I seek out lessons from Roger Federer? That seems pointless, and maybe a little bit presumptuous. He's the greatest tennis player in the world, and I'm a rank beginner -- why would anyone think that I needed his instruction to learn tennis, or could benefit from it?

Ideally, you would like to learn from the best teacher of beginners -- which is not necessarily someone holding a certain dan ranking. But even that's a bit much. The outcome of a learning experience depends at least as much on your quality as a student as it does on the teacher, and there are many senseis who are plenty good enough to teach a beginner everything that that beginner is capable of learning at that time.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2008, 11:38 AM   #24
mathewjgano
 
mathewjgano's Avatar
Dojo: Tsubaki Kannagara Jinja Aikidojo; Himeji Shodokan Dojo
Location: Renton
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 2,086
United_States
Offline
Re: New Person Training Full Time

Quote:
Diane Lasken wrote: View Post
I have researched Aikido for about 2 years. I want to learn from the best and dedicate myself to learning it. I'd prefer to learn outside of North American where I can be around another culture while I learn Aikido.
I just want to echo the idea that being an uchi-deshi can be pretty demanding. I haven't had any real experience with it, but I get the sense it can be a full-time job with little to no pay sometimes. It's particularly hard if you have no experience, I think too. Still, it's certainly not unheard of.
As far as spending such a large sum of money is concerned, don't overlook the idea of investing it somehow. 2 Years of off-mat study probably can't give you a very deep impression...you may want to train in it locally for a little while and get a base understanding before dedicating so much of your time.
I don't know your particular situation so I'm mostly speaking for how I'd act; based on what little I know. I've known folks who've done it right after school like you describe and it seems to have been a good experience, but I think you need to be sure you get a real good sense of the commitment involved. The idea sounds pretty adventurous to me, though it demands a great deal of trust for potentially moving so far away. "Buyer beware," always.

Gambarimashyo!
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2008, 01:17 PM   #25
Diane878
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 8
Offline
Re: New Person Training Full Time

Can someone provide me a list of dojos that have 24/7 programs where you can work/live/train? I'd like to train outside of America in an English speaking dojo.
  Reply With Quote

Please visit our sponsor:

Mugendo Budogu - Official Aikikai Hakama now available!



Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What technique would you apply to neutralize Brazilian Jujitsu attacker Tijani1150 Techniques 411 03-10-2014 02:19 PM
Full Speed Randori and Self Defense smithid General 40 12-27-2009 11:24 PM
Does Budo require a sense of shame? senshincenter General 72 09-12-2005 02:06 PM
How many practice Rokkyo? ChrisHein Techniques 87 05-13-2005 09:49 AM
Shu Ha Ri akiy General 21 07-12-2004 02:32 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:03 AM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2014 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2014 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate