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Old 04-09-2002, 07:40 PM   #26
JAD
Dojo: NE Academy of Aikido
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Ki Symbol

I'll agree with other reviewers concerning "Aikido and the Dynamic Sphere". It is a great starting point. Another good book, although I believe out of print at this point, is Koichi Tohei's classic "This Is Aikido". It is very visual and covers a lot of ground. Your Best bet is to scour the used book shops in your area. It is worth the effort.

PEACE!
JAD

JAD
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Old 04-09-2002, 08:32 PM   #27
Kat.C
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Quote:
Originally posted by ca
Hey, Kat, so how was that first class, anyway?

I would join with those who are urging you NOT to buy a book of techniques. Buy a biography if you wish, or books on the philosophy or even poetry of Aikido, if you are really up for a mind-bending experience then there's one by Gleason Sensei that should make you go 'hmmmmm ', more approachable (to me at least) ones by Stevens or Saotome Sensei... but make sure they are in keeping with the way your sensei wants you to look at Aikido, or it will be hard on you as a beginner to figure out what to think.

But avoid technique books. There is a natural desire on the part of beginners to get a book to study up, so they are not so confused. But it will only confuse you more. Unless your sensei wrote the book, even if it is the same style, but certainly if it is from a different style, things will not be the same. Even if your sensei DID write the book, what he was showing in the book might not be what he wants to be teaching right now. The Shihan of my organization has made videos and books. Which have dutifully been committed to memory and retained as gospel by his students, so much so that when he demonstrates a technique at seminars, the great majority hop up and do not what he showed, but what's in the book/video. Makes me want to cry. Probably doesn't do much for him, either.

It is good you are a visual learner. Just watch what you are shown closely, and repeat it. But feeling it really is the best way to go, I think, just nothing compares. Pay attention to what your body feels when you are uke. Take notes or since you are visual, draw stick figures or diagrams.

I think the important thing for a beginner to learn is how to learn, and it's not from memorizing a set of pictures in a book, because those are rarely shown in class (Saito Sensei's books I will say are an exception, probably because of the Iwama kihon attitude)-- but unless you are in an Iwama dojo, they won't serve the purpose you're after.

I'd invest in a nice notebook to take to class, and fill it up with notes as quickly as possible.
Hi Colleen, I posted my thoughts on my first aikido class in the Chit Chat forum, but in short it was alot of fun and even more confusing. Are there no basics? I miss my basics and kata.
I'm not looking to get a book so that I can memorize all the techniques, just to help me out with things that I get shown in class.
I was taught in karate not to get ahead of what sensei teaches me, it would be too confusing to try anyway. I just need some visual reminders of what we do. I wouldn't be able to figure out a technique from a book anyway I would need to have done it in class first, I am hoping for a book that can help me out when I get confused practising at home and I have a feeling that will happen alot. I am not in a rush though, I figured when I decided to start aikido that I would spend my first few months in utter confusion!
Right now I am content to work on my backward rolls (practised alot today but I don't think I improved any) and moving as we were shown, I spent most of the class off balance. I knew it would be different then what I had done but I was surprised at how much it differed.
Thanks for all the advice, I wish I could practice with you guys instead of just 'talking' to you here, bet I'd learn alot more. Oh well I have plenty of time to figure things out and I expect to enjoy the process.

Kat

I find the aquisition of knowledge to be relatively easy, it is the application that is so difficult.
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Old 04-09-2002, 09:55 PM   #28
guest1234
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Hi Kat,

I'll have to go check out chit chat... I have a bad habit of only checking out what is on the home page and then wandering off into cyber space.

Oh, there are plenty of basics... just depends on who is teaching as to what they are ... all part of the grand plan to always keep us off balance and confused
Some styles and teachers stress things they want beginners to learn more than others, some dojos have beginners classes (which also can vary a lot in content), some just toss you in to sink or swim... but I'll put good money you'll do fine regardless.

Have fun with the rolls...
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Old 04-10-2002, 05:54 AM   #29
Kat.C
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Well Colleen, it was pretty much the sink or swim thing for us, My husband swam, I, well I didn't drown . Aside from the few minutes one of the seniors spent teaching us backward rolls we did what the rest of the class was doing. Or atttempted to. Everyone was patient and helpful though, but they kept asking me if I was getting it! I thought that was quite funny, I mean it was my first class. Usually I just answered "not yet". I think I will be saying that for quite some time to come. Thanks for the encouragement.

Kat

I find the aquisition of knowledge to be relatively easy, it is the application that is so difficult.
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Old 04-10-2002, 06:58 AM   #30
Bruce Baker
Dojo: LBI Aikikai/LBI ,NJ
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Books

I was at Barnes and Noble in Cherry Hill, NJ a couple of weeks ago, and they had a very slim selection of Aikido books, but it was a good place to actually open the books and look at them. Although I think actually looking through one owned by a friend makes it a give in to purchase a book post haste.

A trip to the local book store might be your best bet.

Excuse me while I address Andy Russo who seems to be personally enamored with attacking me.

Since you are the master of these threads Andy, maybe you can explain for the rest of us the seven pillars of Aikido as out lined by John Stevens Sensei, and differences in the styles of Aikido as they relate to incorporating Judo, Jujitsu and Karate into each particular style? Why hitting a muscle leaves black and blue, while pressure points don't.

If you can't, then please grow up and get out into the world and learn what I am learning, continue to learn. Aikido contains more than meets the eye, or our teachers and shihans give to us in practice.

Sorry, had to do it. Stress ain't no good for Meniere's.

As for books, don't be in a hurry, one will catch your fancy and that will be your book.
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Old 04-10-2002, 07:16 AM   #31
thomson
 
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Blush! A dissenting opinion

Kat, while I basically agree with everyone that you should check with your sensei and sempais, I don't agree that you should not pick up a book that shows techniques. I am also a beginner and the first book I bought was "Aikido" by Kisshomura Ueshiba, O'sensei's son and 2nd doshu. It helps me immensely to remember the techniques shown in class. BTW the style I practice is also under the aikikai "umbrella". Sarpy Aikido is a part Aikido Hawaii International under Robert Kubo shihan, a style very similar to the techniques in the book.

Sorry, but it was bugging me that the concensus seems to be "Stay away from technique books" and as a visual person also the books are nothing but help.

Mike

To secure ourselves against defeat lies in our own hands, but the opportunity of defeating the enemy is provided by the enemy himself. - Sun Tzu
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Old 04-10-2002, 07:20 AM   #32
Kat.C
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Re: Books

Quote:
Originally posted by Bruce Baker

Excuse me while I address Andy Russo who seems to be personally enamored with attacking me.

.
Personal attacks! I thought there were no attacks in aikido Where is all the harmony I keep reading about in these forums

Couldn't resist I have noticed a bit of tension? in some of the threads.

Kat

I find the aquisition of knowledge to be relatively easy, it is the application that is so difficult.
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Old 04-10-2002, 07:33 AM   #33
giriasis
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Quote:
Originally posted by akiy

I'm just adding on to what you said, Anne Marie. I wasn't disagreeing.

I've edited the post in hopes of making myself more clear. Hope it helps...

-- Jun
No problem, I know I was defensive and I apologize for that. I just kind of went "huh?" when I read it.

Anne Marie Giri
Women in Aikido: a place where us gals can come together and chat about aikido.
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Old 04-10-2002, 09:15 AM   #34
Andy
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Re: Books

Quote:
Originally posted by Bruce Baker
maybe you can explain for the rest of us the seven pillars of Aikido as out lined by John Stevens Sensei,
Nine. Go read Stevens's "The Philosophy of Aikido."
Quote:
and differences in the styles of Aikido as they relate to incorporating Judo, Jujitsu and Karate into each particular style?
Yoseikan budo (Mochizuki) incorporates aikijujutsu, karate, judo, and kobudo; Mochizuki studied under Ueshiba, Kano, and Funakoshi. Nishio's aikido which includes elements from his training in iaido (7th dan), karate (6th dan), and judo (5th dan). Tomiki aikido has a lot of elements of judo as well with Tomiki himself having held a 7th dan. Morita's Nihon Goshin Aikido, although not having its roots with Ueshiba, contains elements of the above martial arts.

Should I go on?
Quote:
Why hitting a muscle leaves black and blue, while pressure points don't.
Bruises are caused by capillaries rupturing under the skin. Any technique including "pressure point" (whatever) manipulation or even massage when done wrong will leave bruises.
Quote:
If you can't, then please grow up and get out into the world and learn what I am learning, continue to learn. Aikido contains more than meets the eye, or our teachers and shihans give to us in practice.
Pot. Kettle. Black.

Oops. There goes your high horse. You better catch it so you can get back on it, child.
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Old 04-10-2002, 09:44 AM   #35
erikmenzel
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Re: Books

Quote:
By Bruce Baker
As for books, don't be in a hurry, one will catch your fancy and that will be your book.
And yours was, let me have a wild guess,





Bluf your way into Aikido ??



[putting on asbestus flame protection suit]

Last edited by erikmenzel : 04-10-2002 at 10:11 AM.

Erik Jurrien Menzel
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Old 04-10-2002, 09:51 AM   #36
Kat.C
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My goodness, I never thought my book thread would get so interesting. Tell me, are you guys this gentle with your ukes?

Kat

I find the aquisition of knowledge to be relatively easy, it is the application that is so difficult.
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Old 04-10-2002, 10:00 AM   #37
erikmenzel
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Quote:
My goodness, I never thought my book thread would get so interesting. Tell me, are you guys this gentle with your ukes?
Best thing to do, is come to the Netherlands and train with our club and find out for yourself.
Or, for me to come to your club and train there.

I can of course tell you that I am this nice 2 metres, 110 kilogrammes guy (transfering this to some weird non metric measure I leave to someone else), who is loved by everybody and everybody likes to train with, but then you just have to take my word for it.

Hope it can come to the first option one day, for that one allows for contact, friendship and learning!

Take care and train.

Erik Jurrien Menzel
kokoro o makuru taisanmen ni hirake
Personal:www.kuipers-menzel.com
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Old 04-10-2002, 11:10 AM   #38
guest1234
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No, Kat, don't do it!!!

I swear, all Dutch are giants. Even the babies. Really. I lived there for three years and grade school kids dwarfed me. Must either be all the healthy milk or the bike riding...

Seriously, before Erik attacks, I loved my time there. Folks were big (even the US babies born there were big, we used to laugh about it), and I've never lived in a foreign country where we (US military) were so uniformly welcomed. Even the demonstrators (we had a few, the Dutch are also the social conscious of the world) were uniformly friendly and polite.
My last year there I marched in Neijmegen (boy, it's been a while, hope I got that right ), and the only thing keeping me going the last 25 miles was the cheerful encouragement from all the folks lining the sidewalks.
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Old 04-10-2002, 11:13 AM   #39
Kat.C
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Well I am only 5'2" so I don't need to go anywhere at all to be dwarved!

Ummm, Colleen, you said "the last 25 miles", how far did you have to march?

Last edited by Kat.C : 04-10-2002 at 11:19 AM.

Kat

I find the aquisition of knowledge to be relatively easy, it is the application that is so difficult.
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Old 04-10-2002, 11:57 AM   #40
erikmenzel
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Quote:
Originally posted by ca
No, Kat, don't do it!!!

But if you do, you will be welcome!!!

Quote:
I swear, all Dutch are giants. Even the babies. Really. I lived there for three years and grade school kids dwarfed me. Must either be all the healthy milk or the bike riding...
This is true, the Dutch are (statisticaly) the tallest on the world. And for your comfort, I am big for dutch standards.

Quote:
Seriously, before Erik attacks, I loved my time there. Folks were big (even the US babies born there were big, we used to laugh about it), and I've never lived in a foreign country where we (US military) were so uniformly welcomed. Even the demonstrators (we had a few, the Dutch are also the social conscious of the world) were uniformly friendly and polite.
My last year there I marched in Neijmegen (boy, it's been a while, hope I got that right ), and the only thing keeping me going the last 25 miles was the cheerful encouragement from all the folks lining the sidewalks.
Glad to here you enjoyed your time in the Netherlands and have such good memories.
The 4-days march at Nijmegen is indeed very famous and considered special for all the military from various countries that participate (btw, did you have to do the 31 miles every day or the 40 miles??)

Last edited by erikmenzel : 04-10-2002 at 12:01 PM.

Erik Jurrien Menzel
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Old 04-10-2002, 03:13 PM   #41
JPT
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I found Aikido, Traditional Art & Modern Sport by Brian Bagot very useful when I first started.
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Old 04-10-2002, 03:54 PM   #42
guest1234
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Oh, great, now's a great time to find I was lied to... they told me it was 25 miles a day for 4 days with a 40 pound pack (plus my medical supplies), but all the weights and distances were in km and kg, so I was at the mercy of the organizers... We had an Air Force team (I dragged one teammate the back 12 miles--or whatever it was--the first day, by God we were going to finish...) and the US Army teams thought we were crazy.

Met many nice groups of other military, became separated from my group the third day and ended up with what sounded like Dutch marines (didn't realize there was such a thing, if I understood them right) for a time. Started out behind a team from the UK one morning who had bagpipes for the first mile or so...

Hardest part was the last part, from official end of the march/tent area through town center...my team had decided we should wear our 'blues' at this point, and my feet really rebelled at changing boots for pumps at this point.

So...how about you, have you been that crazy? I know the civilians had a separate route...
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Old 04-10-2002, 04:07 PM   #43
thomson
 
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Lightbulb Ding! and the light comes on!

Kat,
I just thought of something, that may be helpful. Try to get a hold of tapes of seminars put on by people in your association. Great visual aids, and most importantly, won't confuse you on styles. I have a tape from the last time Kubo sensei was in town, and on it is the sandan test for our sensei's son. Watching his test helped me remember the points in the jo kata I had forgot.

Hope that helps!
Mike

To secure ourselves against defeat lies in our own hands, but the opportunity of defeating the enemy is provided by the enemy himself. - Sun Tzu
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Old 04-10-2002, 04:10 PM   #44
erikmenzel
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Quote:
Originally posted by ca
Dutch marines (didn't realize there was such a thing, if I understood them right)
60% of our country is below sealevel and more then 50% of our country is bordered by sea and still you didnt expect us to have marines???
Quote:
So...how about you, have you been that crazy?
No, I havent, although I ran a dozen of marathons, which probably equaly qualifies as brainrot

Erik Jurrien Menzel
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Old 04-10-2002, 09:10 PM   #45
guest1234
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Sorry

But all those guys in uniform (Air Force, I will admit) with pony tails and earrings that made me think military service might be not quite the same as in the US

marathons! yes, you win the crazy award
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Old 04-10-2002, 10:44 PM   #46
Bronson
 
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Hey all,
While we're on the subject of books...
I'm looking for martial arts books from any style (karate, judo, aikido, kungfu...) that deal with the authors experiences in learning/training, or teaching their art. I'm not looking for any techniques, I actually prefer if there are no pictures. If you've read Autumn Lightning or Persimmon Wind by Dave Lowry, or Moving Zen by C.W. Nicol, or In Search of the Warrior Spirit by Richard Heckler then you probably know the kind of book I'm looking for. More of a story of what they went through and what they might have learned about themselves from the experience.

Thanks,
Bronson

"A pacifist is not really a pacifist if he is unable to make a choice between violence and non-violence. A true pacifist is able to kill or maim in the blink of an eye, but at the moment of impending destruction of the enemy he chooses non-violence."
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Old 04-12-2002, 09:37 AM   #47
Andy
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Re: Re: Books

Quote:
Originally posted by Andy
Oops. There goes your high horse. You better catch it so you can get back on it, child.
Aww, Bruce. No response to all of my answers to your questions which "proved" you were so superior to everyone else? Sorry to see your bubble bursting, child.
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