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Old 07-17-2007, 10:01 AM   #51
Upyu
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Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

Quote:
Franco Cuminato wrote: View Post
Robert:

I'm gonna make every effort to go and see Akuzawa and you in Seattle. Do you think that with a weekend seminar, someone like me, with no real understanding of ki, can get started on the road of internal strength development?
You can, but the biggest hurdle will be the mental one I think.
The second biggest will be to train daily and be prepared to completely rework how you move in daily life

If you can do those two things, then Id say you have a fair shot at it.
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Old 07-17-2007, 10:53 AM   #52
MM
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Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

I think Wang Shujin understood fascia and tensegrity.

Check out the first 5 seconds of this vid:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TgSPsiQhAZk

Smith was giving it a go and hurt his hand. In Smith's book, Martial Musings, Jon Bluming tried the same thing and hurt his hand.
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Old 07-17-2007, 07:03 PM   #53
Al Gutierrez
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Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

Ignatius,

I'll buy the explanation of "fundamental skills" = baseline skills. That works better for me than "basic".

I've seen the videos of Shioda. I understand your bike tire analogy and I guess that works in a vague way, but I was hoping for an example of how you train to "pack your breath" or "twist and wind" as you say, (exactly what/how?) and then an application of that skill to a simple technique.

This is a baseline skill you guys are asserting, yet it's too complicated to explain - I understand it has to be shown - so would someone please post a video of themselves explaining, teaching, and doing it and not simply point to Ueshiba, Shioda or CXW? You don't have to be a master, just show how you train it and how you apply it.

Thanks for the responses so far.

A. G.
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Old 07-17-2007, 10:01 PM   #54
eyrie
 
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Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

Well, if you understand the bike tire analogy then the HOW should be pretty self-evident...

Some of the exercises have already been covered. See Rob's earlier post. Mike has already mentioned a few in various posts.

My suggestion would be to look closely at the "warm up" exercises and basic techniques, to see how these basic principles apply... it's right there, hidden in plain sight.

How I would train "it", is slowly and gently. Uke is there to help provide bio-feedback. It is not a contest of strength or you trying to "do something" to uke.

Like Dan says, it's ALL about you... working on YOU. And I would say, the same goes for uke...

Ignatius
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Old 07-17-2007, 10:29 PM   #55
Upyu
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Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

Quote:
Al Gutierrez wrote: View Post
Ignatius,

I'll buy the explanation of "fundamental skills" = baseline skills. That works better for me than "basic".

I've seen the videos of Shioda. I understand your bike tire analogy and I guess that works in a vague way, but I was hoping for an example of how you train to "pack your breath" or "twist and wind" as you say, (exactly what/how?) and then an application of that skill to a simple technique.

This is a baseline skill you guys are asserting, yet it's too complicated to explain - I understand it has to be shown - so would someone please post a video of themselves explaining, teaching, and doing it and not simply point to Ueshiba, Shioda or CXW? You don't have to be a master, just show how you train it and how you apply it.

Thanks for the responses so far.

A. G.
Al,
See the "Training for Martial Movement" in the training section. It has an overview of what needs to be stabilized/conditioned before you even get into the breathing aspect.

Anyways I see you're in Colorado...why not go see Mike
It would shortcut hours of trying to figure this stuff out on your own.
Btw, I have some youtube vids up of myself at various points in time doing the exercises we do at Aunkai, so you can see how the movement changes over time.
(god did i suck 2 years back...and I know Im going to say the same thing 2 years later )
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Old 07-18-2007, 12:37 AM   #56
Aran Bright
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Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

Quote:
Robert John wrote: View Post
Another point though is that, when you "fight" someone else, all you do is try to maintain your equilibrium. Dan has said this before as well. Its all about "you" and you alone. You have no time to be worrying about your opponent and setting him up really.
So as you "equalize" your body and consequently neutralize your opponent, youre automatically adjusting your "ki" with respect to your "opponent".
Hi Rob,

I like this statment, I have recently begun to think of technique as simply being a way to 'correct' the disruption to your structure that is caused from someone's attack, and that 'correction' is what powers the 'chosen' technique; regardless of what technique we are talking about.

Regards,

Aran

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Old 07-18-2007, 12:38 AM   #57
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Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

Quote:
Robert John wrote: View Post
Anyways I see you're in Colorado...why not go see Mike It would shortcut hours of trying to figure this stuff out on your own. [emphasis added]
Rob, I never thought I'd say this, but you're a master of understatement.

-ck

Last edited by clwk : 07-18-2007 at 12:38 AM. Reason: general stupidity
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Old 07-18-2007, 01:21 AM   #58
Al Gutierrez
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Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

Quote:
How I would train "it", is slowly and gently. Uke is there to help provide bio-feedback. It is not a contest of strength or you trying to "do something" to uke.
But Mike says that uke is forced...

Quote:
...the essential idea is not really just the "blending" of technique, it's the instantaneous and automatic (mushin) adjustment of your ki so that there is a resultant direction Uke is forced to go because of something he initiated himself.
I've followed a lot of these threads but I'll do some of your suggested reading and look for the youtube clips and check back.

I've experienced the sort of things you speak of including stuff much like the previous Shioda clip, so I'm not a complete newb or non-believer. I have some background in aikido and various other arts and I also know someone who does Daito Ryu, although I haven't run into him in a little while he could do amazing things after just a few years in Japan. His perspective on these internal things seemed a bit different from either the usual aikido view or what you guys have been suggesting though. I'm just always trying to learn more.

I'm not in Colorado very often these days, and even then, I believe that Mike is a bit south and quite out of my way.

Gracias anyhow,

A.G.
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Old 07-18-2007, 01:50 AM   #59
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Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

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Al Gutierrez wrote: View Post
But Mike says that uke is forced...
Correct. Uke is forced to go because of something he initiated. What I was referring to was from a "just beginning" POV. Obviously, if you are better than uke at equalizing yourself, then uke will likely be forced to go as soon as he tries to initiate something. If uke is better, then maybe you will be forced to go. If you are both equally good, then the first one to "lose" it may be forced to go.

If that makes sense?

Ignatius
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Old 07-18-2007, 02:02 AM   #60
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Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

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Ignatius Teo wrote: View Post
Correct. Uke is forced to go because of something he initiated. What I was referring to was from a "just beginning" POV. Obviously, if you are better than uke at equalizing yourself, then uke will likely be forced to go as soon as he tries to initiate something. If uke is better, then maybe you will be forced to go. If you are both equally good, then the first one to "lose" it may be forced to go.

If that makes sense?
Yea, more like, Tori is only Tori so long as he's able to actually neutralize Uke. If Uke is better, just switch the names around, as tori lands on his ass

I believe this is the way they practiced in Sagawa's dojo as well with respect to Kokyu-ho/Agete. One person holds down, the other tries to raise. Technically the Uke is the one holding down. But if Tori can't affect Uke's structure, he quickly becomes Uke.
Really the names are subjective, since both people are really working on the same things but from different perspectives/roles.
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Old 07-18-2007, 03:18 AM   #61
Aran Bright
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Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

The following is taken from a text that I have referenced below;

"Tensegrity structures actually become stronger when they are stressed as load applied is distributed not only to the area being directly loaded but throughout the structure. They employ both compressional and tensional elements. When applying the principles of tensegrity to the human body, one can readily see the bones and the intervertebral discs as the discontinous compressional units and the myofascial tissues (muscles, tendons, ligament, fascia and to some degree the discs) as the tensional elements. When load is applied (as in lifting) both the osseous and myofascial tissues distribute the stress incurred."

(Chaitow, L and DeLany, J.W., 2002, Clinical Applications of Neuromuscular Techniques, vol 1, the upper body, p9)

FWIW,

Aran

Last edited by Aran Bright : 07-18-2007 at 03:22 AM.

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Old 07-18-2007, 04:19 AM   #62
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Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

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Robert John wrote: View Post
Really the names are subjective, since both people are really working on the same things but from different perspectives/roles.
The "roles" are in reality arbitrary distinctions for pedagogical purposes. So, I would qualify that with ..."working on the same things and working ON themselves".... For the arbitrary "role-play" distinction to hold in learning mode, it boils down to individual skill levels and abilities, and whether the more advanced practitioner is willing to help the other and to what extent. Especially considering that the better you get, the "heavier" you tend to "feel" to the other person.

Ignatius
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Old 07-18-2007, 01:33 PM   #63
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Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

Quote:
Jennifer Smith wrote: View Post
glad I could help.
Huh? In what way?

Tarik Ghbeish
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Old 07-18-2007, 01:46 PM   #64
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Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

Quote:
Robert John wrote: View Post
Yea, more like, Tori is only Tori so long as he's able to actually neutralize Uke. If Uke is better, just switch the names around, as tori lands on his ass

I believe this is the way they practiced in Sagawa's dojo as well with respect to Kokyu-ho/Agete. One person holds down, the other tries to raise. Technically the Uke is the one holding down. But if Tori can't affect Uke's structure, he quickly becomes Uke.
Really the names are subjective, since both people are really working on the same things but from different perspectives/roles.
This recent direction in the thread puts a lot of things in place to me. It fits together with the concepts and language I'm currently exploring in my training. Of course, only a hands on experience really verifies when people are talking about the same things, because I've had plenty of encounters with people who feel that we're all talking about the same stuff only to find that we aren't. Such a meeting with my current teacher really made me open my eyes about how we often talk past one another online about this stuff and how pointless some of the discussions can be until people actually meet and experience openly. Even then, I've witnessed people not get it for whatever reason.

Here's some of my current thoughts about this line of discussion. While we tend to assign the roles in training, the roles are really descriptive of who has sente (and gets to make the next decision) in the interaction, rather than who is trying to do what. Both partners are working on (or should be) their own internal posture, structure, relaxation and tension in appropriate movements and the roles are really interchangeable from moment to moment.

Since two people connected become a system, how each person moves affects the whole system, but the intent in the practice is not to move the other person, but to correctly adjust yourself to maintain posture, recover any loss of balance, and notice the results of that in the other person without specifically doing anything to the other person. If you get it right, it's almost like they're doing it to themselves, although certainly, tori has to do the right things for that to be able to happen. It feels soft and almost effortless to tori, but impossibly heavy or even forceful to uke.

Tarik Ghbeish
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MASAKATSU AGATSU -- "The true victory of self-mastery."
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Old 07-18-2007, 01:50 PM   #65
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Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

AL
In response to your advanced or basic question. I think its really both. Everyone can start this type of training. You just need someone who can do it -to teach it to you. IMHO the bulk of the work is you on your own away from distractions. The purity of your work really becomes self evident and transparent to everyone. If you notice -everyone who has written in-sort of checks their ego at the door. You work your ass off-ever sweat standing still?-then realize after a few years you still suck. It has it's own way of reminding you how much work you have to do.

You asked about videos on the Baseline skills thread. Utter waste of time I think. Hell I have trouble with folks standing in front of me what the hell am I going to accomplish on a video. I ain't no movie star or Budo teacher, nor do I aim to be anytime soon I'd say trust what everyone is telling about the videos being a waste of time for you. They are.

[]Fascia[/u]
Just try to imagine everything in your body being connected by a flexible sheath. Try to imagine that you can control it's movement and have it make connections inside you that cause large body responses to input. Whether it be a wide spread load dispersal receiver, or a highly focused current of power- it involves trained tendon/fascia/bone/muscle. There are many things that can be discussed. How it engages, what controls it, and what is actually changing in you, why can it be moved and felt. Why you can grab someone and instantly know if they are working the right things or not. Why this work -IS- Aikido- every wrist grab (training or waza) it inherited from Daito ryu. Why wrist grabs had meaning for training as in you grab my wrist I absorb you and control you with my whole body or part of it, (my choice) and moving my hara can and will move you. This is.....NOT.......the same as Aikido people moving THEIR whole body all over the place to make someone else move!! Tenkan is a wast of time. Standing in the same spot and making them fly across YOU because they grabbed your wrist...isn't. That is a simple exercise in moving your fascia with your center while standing still and they feel compelled and drawn to to be uprooted and moved across you. That degenerated into them grabbing tough and remaining standing and you moving around them (tenkan)...bleck. it will only teach low level stuff not even worth learning IMO.
Speaking of which you can clearly demonstrate just how connected someone is by what they are doing with their center, what it effects and what it is connected too. watched a taiji copy his teachers "moving belly" motions, really really well. The only problem was the students center wasn't connected to anything to move in the first place. Still looked cool though. In short if you haven't trained your body to move as a whole, you're not going to get by pretending it is. To this day I yell at my self for slacking off. And I train in one form or another everyday. I believe fascia/tendon work takes intention and attention on a regular basis.
We can talk all day about what is connected to what and how to manipulate it, but it's rather pointless. I get folks to start by doing certain things and then build other connections later on.

Use
The real trick is to let go of fighting people and working on maintaining your own structure. It is the main reason this training is tailor made fr any grappling situation. You structure has nothing to do with your uke- it is your own. His trying to manipulate your structure, reveals the holes in his own-particularly if he is using muscle, and all the while you get to stay on your feet and more or less feel indifferent and still "ready to go." If that sounds like granola-crunchy aikido -just think of a judoka working on maintaining a viable posture while under pressure from an intent opponent, it much the same idea just using a whole new set of skills to do it. The advantages are ; that the opponents attacks make more openings for you to counter than a more typical judo /jujutsu shia. Their attempts typically leave them a sweaty mess with an internal player far more relaxed. The reasons for this are to do with the use of Tendon.fascia and the connections they both make and then support in a trained man. Overall I would say it makes a man harder to read, harder to counter, much more powerful to deal with, the strikes and kicks more damaging, and the training makes you healthier.

To counter all the hype, anyone can be knocked out and anyone can be caught. This training just makes you a far better you, no matter what venue you choose to use it in,MMA, BJJ, Jujutsu, Daito ryu, Aikido, or no fighting at all.

Last edited by DH : 07-18-2007 at 01:56 PM.
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Old 07-19-2007, 01:24 AM   #66
Al Gutierrez
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Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

Thanks Dan, your post explains a lot.

Based on my own experiences training and talking with a Daito-ryu practitioner, I think most of what you're describing sounds very much like Daito Ryu 101.

A.G.

"Even an expert can be defeated by a layman, if the expert is negligient." ~ Sokaku Takeda
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Old 07-19-2007, 06:18 PM   #67
DH
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Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

Quote:
Al Gutierrez wrote: View Post
Thanks Dan, your post explains a lot.

Based on my own experiences training and talking with a Daito-ryu practitioner, I think most of what you're describing sounds very much like Daito Ryu 101.
Well..ya!!
Let me think. I've only been saying that for... oh I dunno... 12 years. Where do ya think I got it from?

The real issue is
a. Finding those who can -actually- do it.
then.....
b. Finding those who will -actually- teach you -HOW- to do it.
Then
c. Learning how to actually use it -freestyle- against everyone and anyone-outside.... of Daito ryu

Have fun.
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Old 07-19-2007, 06:42 PM   #68
Mike Sigman
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Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

Quote:
Dan Harden wrote: View Post
c. Learning how to actually use it -freestyle- against everyone and anyone-outside.... of Daito ryu
Ermmmm..... so why were you going to some Taiji dude like Wang Hai Jun for information then, Dan? I'm not sure how you can take "my style" positions about Daito Ryu on an Aikido forum when you've been beating the bushes in other styles for information. Frankly, having met a few people who do Daito Ryu, I'm not comfortable with the assertion that the ki/qi skills are typical "Daito Ryu 101". If it was, I think it would have been clearer, sooner.

Regards,

Mike Sigman
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Old 07-19-2007, 07:25 PM   #69
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Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

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Mike Sigman wrote: View Post
Ermmmm..... so why were you going to some Taiji dude like Wang Hai Jun for information then, Dan? I'm not sure how you can take "my style" positions about Daito Ryu on an Aikido forum when you've been beating the bushes in other styles for information. Frankly, having met a few people who do Daito Ryu, I'm not comfortable with the assertion that the ki/qi skills are typical "Daito Ryu 101". If it was, I think it would have been clearer, sooner.

Regards,

Mike Sigman
Why do you paint everything in such a lousy, smarmy light?
Some taiji dude? Gees, Mike Knock it off already.

What I have been doing is called research. Good, bad, or indifferent. As for DR?
DR is about as different as you can get depending on the school/style/ and the teacher student relationship.

FWIW, Frankly I think you referring to anything as "taiji" has no merit what-so-ever if I based it on the students -I- have met in several venues. The only difference being that while ...I... understand there is a difference between students and teachers (and you do too, Mike)... I don't use it conveniently to beret others and make cheap-shots on the net.
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Old 07-19-2007, 07:37 PM   #70
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Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

Quote:
Dan Harden wrote: View Post
Why do you paint everything in such a lousy, smarmy light?
Some taiji dude? Gees, Mike Knock it off already.

What I have been doing is called research. Good, bad, or indifferent. As for DR?
DR is about as different as you can get depending on the school/style/ and the teacher student relationship.

FWIW, Frankly I think you referring to anything as "taiji" has no merit what-so-ever if I based it on the students -I- have met in several venues. The only difference being that while ...I... understand there is a difference between students and teachers (and you do too, Mike)... I don't use it conveniently to beret others and make cheap-shots on the net.
Maybe we're reading two different threads, but my comments and questions were about some pretty direct Daito-Ryu assertions, despite the fact that you're not addressing them and are trying to change the subject back to me again. Of course, I admit that's better than your simply not being able to answer or to your pulling all your posts.

Again.... if you think this stuff is only for people "inside Daito Ryu", then you're the one making the smear and smarmy remarks. If you didn't mean it that way, why not say so instead of another personal shot?

Mike Sigman
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Old 07-21-2007, 03:32 PM   #71
DH
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Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote: View Post
Maybe we're reading two different threads, but my comments and questions were about some pretty direct Daito-Ryu assertions, despite the fact that you're not addressing them and are trying to change the subject back to me again. Of course, I admit that's better than your simply not being able to answer or to your pulling all your posts.
Mike Sigman
There wasn't a change of subject. You weren't involved in the subject at all. You interjected . Not that I mind, Many times I enjoy your posts. But if you interject and throw zingers at me -yet again- you just may get a reply.
Here's a sample of communication 101 from Sigman -again- bringing up unrelated and side-shot personal comments...
Of course, I admit that's better than your simply not being able to answer or to your pulling all your posts. all while running others down for it.
Zinger #1Not wanting to answer you is quite different from not being able to answer.
Zinger #2 I pulled those posts after asking 12 basic questions with (I think) 9 tangient yet related ones. All of those based off of Three very pointed ones that neither you Mark Jacobson or Ellis could answer. Ellis was very direct and polite and said he couldn't answer them. I then listened to you and Mark run all around the points you simply were not able to address. After asking you to answer them repeatedly, then after a different tact of asking you to consider their meaning in the discussion I got to watch you side-step back to your own agenda. It was pointless to pursue that line of discussion you guys simply weren't interested in or were unable to answer and clearly were interested in going else where with it.

So far in these three threads you have -by intent- brought up posts by me, and your opinion of me from 1 to 2 years ago-then get all sensitive on me about personal commentary back at ya. Stay off making your ever ready slights and digs at me, and you won't see me have to address them in kind. Or not....
Better yet, don't talk to me at all. It's never condusive to moving a discusion forward anyway.

Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote: View Post
Again.... if you think this stuff is only for people "inside Daito Ryu", then you're the one making the smear and smarmy remarks. If you didn't mean it that way, why not say so instead of another personal shot?
Hmm... I directly answered Al. Just where do -you- come in?
And where did I say "this stuff is only for those in DR?"__________ I said what I meant. Here's a novel idea, Mike. Instead of misconstruing things and talking the wrong meaning, A-S-K for clarification.
AL said [/]Based on my own experiences training and talking with a Daito-ryu practitioner, I think most of what you're describing sounds very much like Daito Ryu 101.[/i]
To which I said
[/i]Well..ya!!
Let me think. I've only been saying that for... oh I dunno... 12 years. Where do ya think I got it from?

The real issue is
a. Finding those who can -actually- do it.
then.....
b. Finding those who will -actually- teach you -HOW- to do it.
Then
c. Learning how to actually use it -freestyle- against everyone and anyone-outside.... of Daito ryu

Have fun.[/i]


At least try to follow along....
This exchange between Al and I was honest discourse between two people. We were just ...talking with each other. What a novel idea! Try completing a post without your endless zingers. I've never seen it help in a discussion.

Last edited by DH : 07-21-2007 at 03:46 PM.
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Old 07-21-2007, 03:54 PM   #72
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Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

Edit ran out
To be clear(er) While talking about training- In post #65 I said this

Quote:
To counter all the hype, anyone can be knocked out and anyone can be caught. This training just makes you a far better you, no matter what venue you choose to use it in,MMA, BJJ, Jujutsu, Daito ryu, Aikido, or no fighting at all.
Al then brought up DR.
You then -once again- misread and told -me- I was saying this is only DR. Your take and your point make no sense at all.
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Old 07-21-2007, 04:26 PM   #73
Mike Sigman
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Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

Quote:
Dan Harden wrote: View Post
Zinger #1Not wanting to answer you is quite different from not being able to answer.
"Not wanting to", like in avoiding every direct question I've ever asked, would be one way to try to mask "not being able, to", as well. However, that's another tangent. The point is that you seem unable to answer direct questions about simple procedures even when you introduce the topic with your own assertions. You make assertions. Questions are asked. There's never an answer of substance.
Quote:
Zinger #2 I pulled those posts after asking 12 basic questions with (I think) 9 tangient yet related ones. All of those based off of Three very pointed ones that neither you Mark Jacobson or Ellis could answer. Ellis was very direct and polite and said he couldn't answer them. I then listened to you and Mark run all around the points you simply were not able to address. After asking you to answer them repeatedly, then after a different tact of asking you to consider their meaning in the discussion I got to watch you side-step back to your own agenda. It was pointless to pursue that line of discussion you guys simply weren't interested in or were unable to answer and clearly were interested in going else where with it.
OK, this one should be fairly easy for you... what the hell are you talking about? Once again you make veiled assertions and no one can tell what you're talking about. What questions are you talking about and when..... and why is this diversion to a vague "you couldn't answer a question" an answer to the question I asked? Only a child responds like that. Or goes quiet. Or changes the subject to a personal discussion. Etc.
Quote:
So far in these three threads you have -by intent- brought up posts by me, and your opinion of me from 1 to 2 years ago-then get all sensitive on me about personal commentary back at ya. Stay off making your ever ready slights and digs at me, and you won't see me have to address them in kind. Or not....
. BS. You make wide and general assertions, on your own, you're asked questions in response to your assertions and you try to flip to a personal discussion when you're called on it.
Quote:
Better yet, don't talk to me at all. It's never condusive to moving a discusion forward anyway.
No Dan.... if you don't want people to ask questions on a public list, then don't make general assertions. You're absolutely FAMOUS for dodging questions to your own assertions with BS about "koryu" and "secrets". Not famous... "NOTORIOUS".
Quote:

Hmm... I directly answered Al. Just where do -you- come in?
And where did I say "this stuff is only for those in DR?"__________ I said what I meant. Here's a novel idea, Mike. Instead of misconstruing things and talking the wrong meaning, A-S-K for clarification.
AL said [/]Based on my own experiences training and talking with a Daito-ryu practitioner, I think most of what you're describing sounds very much like Daito Ryu 101.[/i]
To which I said
[/i]Well..ya!!
Let me think. I've only been saying that for... oh I dunno... 12 years. Where do ya think I got it from?

The real issue is
a. Finding those who can -actually- do it.
then.....
b. Finding those who will -actually- teach you -HOW- to do it.
Then
c. Learning how to actually use it -freestyle- against everyone and anyone-outside.... of Daito ryu

Have fun.[/i]
Thanks for making my point for me. But you did that in your last post, as well.

Mike
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Old 07-21-2007, 05:58 PM   #74
DH
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 3,394
United_States
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Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote: View Post
"Not wanting to", like in avoiding every direct question I've ever asked, would be one way to try to mask "not being able, to", as well. However, that's another tangent. The point is that you seem unable to answer direct questions about simple procedures even when you introduce the topic with your own assertions. You make assertions. Questions are asked. There's never an answer of substance.
Sure, Mike. My posts are never about substance. Do you review what you write? I bet you're more of a "seat-o-your-pants" kinda guy aren't ya now?
As for technical information and internet teaching?
Mean like this, Mike?

"Rob you lure them while I spank their bums."....Mike Sigman
"It has to be felt".... Mike Sigman
"It's too complicated to discsuss here....Mike Sigman
Or the ditty you gave about "drawing in through the dantien and then relaxing?" ...(which is piss poor information)
Then saying ......."Go find a teacher".....Mike Sigman

Unlike you I don't "pretend" to teach on the internet, it's a waste of time. I don't even claim to teach in the first place. If you wish to assert "Dan doesn't know anything, and is unable to answer technical questions." Knock yourself out. You're the one who's angry and all frustrated about it and keeps bringin it up. In light of your own posting's- your argument carries little weight.

Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote: View Post
OK, this one should be fairly easy for you... what the hell are you talking about? Once again you make veiled assertions and no one can tell what you're talking about. What questions are you talking about and when..... and why is this diversion to a vague "you couldn't answer a question" an answer to the question I asked? Only a child responds like that.
Yes Mike I'm a child, thanks. Here's a better more thoughtful approach for ya. Learn to deal with frustration or confontation in a more productive manner. It benefits all.
And -I- didn't say no one, Mike-you did. There ya go again blowing things out of proportion, constructing arguments, and ranting away..I referred to the posts I pulled on Aikido Journal which you gave me a hard time for, They were questions involving historical connections from one DR school to the next to Ueshiba, and had a few pointed questions about internal skills "used in the art." You were unabe to address the former due to lack of knowledge and you were unabe to address the later for the same cause. And you are right I've also pulled many replies in heated discusion on E-budo and left "deleted" behind and been thanked for it by those that count, as it doesn't further a discussion to argue. And I'd do it again. I won't apologize for that to you.

Quote:
Mike Sigman wrote: View Post
Or goes quiet. Or changes the subject to a personal discussion. Etc. . BS. You make wide and general assertions, on your own, you're asked questions in response to your assertions and you try to flip to a personal discussion when you're called on it. No Dan.... if you don't want people to ask questions on a public list, then don't make general assertions. You're absolutely FAMOUS for dodging questions to your own assertions with BS about "koryu" and "secrets". Not famous... "NOTORIOUS". Thanks for making my point for me. But you did that in your last post, as well.
Mike
Sigh.. I never "flip" conversations to a personal one. With you I simply choose to answer your insults directly.
As for the rest I answer what I want, when I want, and make no apologies. Most Budo folk are intelligent enough to know how to pursue information. And I seem to get along just fine.
As for Koryu, everyone here is very well versed in your "Koryu is B.S." lines. Thanks.

This isn't productive if you wish to discuss all my shortcomings do so in P.M. I'm much more versed in them than you are. I'm sure I can get others to help you. This thread has a topic- it isn't you...or me.

Last edited by DH : 07-21-2007 at 06:11 PM.
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Old 07-21-2007, 07:56 PM   #75
Al Gutierrez
Location: Colorado
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 39
United_States
Offline
Re: Understanding fascia and tensegrity

Quote:
This thread has a topic- it isn't you...or me.
Gentlemen,

I appreciate any and all input that you've provided to the forum (and myself) on this and other threads, but let's please stick to the topic.

Mike, I asked you a number of questions back in my post #44 that you never answered. Rather than questioning Dan's answers to me why not just answer me directly?
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