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Old 11-15-2006, 10:31 PM   #26
acot
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Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

This is by far one of the best threads I've had the chance to read though. It really strikes at the heart of what Aikido really does. Lynn with all that passion you should write a book on it, and how to apply some of it in a laymen's for those who don't have the clinical experience. I think Dojos everywhere would benefit from such commentary.
Ryan
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Old 11-16-2006, 06:42 AM   #27
SeiserL
 
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Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

Quote:
Ryan Bertram wrote:
This is by far one of the best threads I've had the chance to read though. It really strikes at the heart of what Aikido really does. Lynn with all that passion you should write a book on it, and how to apply some of it in a laymen's for those who don't have the clinical experience. I think Dojos everywhere would benefit from such commentary.
Wow, thank you. I am humbled.

Actually, I do have a collection of articles I have written on Aikido application to many situations "off the mat". I have sent queries to several publishers, received compliments, but no acceptance yet. Many of the past articles from my column (that Jun talked me into, thank you very much) are included. Its called Aiki-Solutions. Now that I have some other projects completed, with this threads encouragement (along with the NVC thread) perhaps I revive it, run it up a flag pole again, and see if anyone salutes it.

BTW, its mostly about entering and blend with a problem rather than resisting it, unbalancing its basic intent or expression, and redirecting it towards a win/win solutions. The biggest problem (and solution) we have is our own mind, especially the part we call identity. Yea, like we can't change our own mind.

Thanks again for the response, support, and encouragement. Its what always keep me showing up at the dojo all these years.

Lynn Seiser PhD
Yondan Aikido & FMA/JKD
We do not rise to the level of our expectations, but fall to the level of our training. Train well. KWATZ!
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Old 11-16-2006, 06:51 AM   #28
markwalsh
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Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

Lynn - tell me what you need, and will do my best to help.
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Old 11-16-2006, 09:44 AM   #29
acot
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Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

Finding that win/win is the most difficult. If the problem is unbalanced it could fall into a worse direction. Resisting on the on set seems a whole lot easier, although it may not provide the solution, but might prevent a bigger problem. Aikido has brought out a lot of awareness issues for me, and problems I didn't even know I had have come up. It has also become away of finding that win/win. Still with only 6 years on the mat, I'm just a beginner and finding that win/win or no deal is the hardest part of the training.
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Old 04-21-2007, 01:07 AM   #30
Lambdadragon
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Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

Hello Aran,

Philip Huang Sensei has worked extensively in the health education and HIV prevention field, as a counselor, teacher, and group facilitator for teens, gay men, sex workers, and immigrants.

He runs a dojo in Berkeley. He is a wonderful person and his contact information can be located at:
http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group...do/message/237

Amos Hee just recently left a position with The Byron Bay, New South Wales Australia organization known as INTRA
(Insight Network Treatment Axis), a community outreach program
offering preventive relapse support and services for people with
drug and/or alcohol problems. Amos is an aikido dan who once operated his own dojo.

http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group...do/message/279
http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group...do/message/239

I no longer have his email address but his personal website is:
http://www.friendster.com/1372635

Amos has also published. You might find his writings through google.

Hope that helps.

Regards,

David Wilson
デイビッド ビィ ウイルソン
http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/GLBTAikido/
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Old 04-22-2007, 04:15 PM   #31
Mary Eastland
 
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Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

I wrote a book called self-defense for everyday that is based on Aikido principles. I could send you a copy if you like.
Mary
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Old 04-23-2007, 04:38 AM   #32
Aran Bright
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Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

Quote:
David Wilson wrote: View Post
Hello Aran,

Philip Huang Sensei has worked extensively in the health education and HIV prevention field, as a counselor, teacher, and group facilitator for teens, gay men, sex workers, and immigrants.

He runs a dojo in Berkeley. He is a wonderful person and his contact information can be located at:
http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group...do/message/237

Amos Hee just recently left a position with The Byron Bay, New South Wales Australia organization known as INTRA
(Insight Network Treatment Axis), a community outreach program
offering preventive relapse support and services for people with
drug and/or alcohol problems. Amos is an aikido dan who once operated his own dojo.

http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group...do/message/279
http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group...do/message/239

I no longer have his email address but his personal website is:
http://www.friendster.com/1372635

Amos has also published. You might find his writings through google.

Hope that helps.

Regards,
Thanks you David, I'll get in touch shortly

http://brisbaneaikido.com

Brisbane Aikido Republic
Brisbane
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Old 04-23-2007, 04:41 AM   #33
Aran Bright
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Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

Quote:
Mary Eastland wrote: View Post
I wrote a book called self-defense for everyday that is based on Aikido principles. I could send you a copy if you like.
Mary
Wow, thank you. I'll PM you for details.

http://brisbaneaikido.com

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Old 04-23-2007, 08:34 AM   #34
jennifer paige smith
 
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Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

Quote:
Aran Bright wrote: View Post
Thank you for replying to this thread.

What are the core principles that you maintain to allow the healing to occur rather than further damage. I know when someone who is ready to face there demons are already very unsettled to begin with how can stop from making it worse?
In a certain respect, I feel we are not equipped and it is not our job to TRY to heal people (not that you are saying we should). Ellis Amdur wrote a good article on this. From my own experience traveling down the road of aikido after a life with abuse and neglect, and from my own experience teaching , I find that Aikido itself heals. On a very real level the seen and unseen elements of practice rise to meet the injured person in a way that we ourselves could very possibly never concieve. Well structured practice, adhering to the movements and approaching the mat with total sincerity are a few of the tools of practice that have helped to support healing in my travel.In my experience the waza is the greatest healer. As long as we keep aikido in our eyes first, above all else, we will provide healthy opportunities for people to discover their healing process in or out of Aikido.

In my work with at-risk teens the single greatest tool has been the courage to be really myself, to say the 'wrong' thing, to tell the truth as I see it, to be honest in my own struggles and to get out of the way of Aikido as it is transmitted through me from the teachings of my teachers. Because I don't sell salvation we all have to work together to find our paths. The students respect this ultimately and many become helpers in life because of it.
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Old 04-23-2007, 05:28 PM   #35
Aran Bright
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Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

Quote:
Jennifer Smith wrote: View Post
In a certain respect, I feel we are not equipped and it is not our job to TRY to heal people (not that you are saying we should). Ellis Amdur wrote a good article on this. From my own experience traveling down the road of aikido after a life with abuse and neglect, and from my own experience teaching , I find that Aikido itself heals. On a very real level the seen and unseen elements of practice rise to meet the injured person in a way that we ourselves could very possibly never concieve. Well structured practice, adhering to the movements and approaching the mat with total sincerity are a few of the tools of practice that have helped to support healing in my travel.In my experience the waza is the greatest healer. As long as we keep aikido in our eyes first, above all else, we will provide healthy opportunities for people to discover their healing process in or out of Aikido.

In my work with at-risk teens the single greatest tool has been the courage to be really myself, to say the 'wrong' thing, to tell the truth as I see it, to be honest in my own struggles and to get out of the way of Aikido as it is transmitted through me from the teachings of my teachers. Because I don't sell salvation we all have to work together to find our paths. The students respect this ultimately and many become helpers in life because of it.
Hi Jennifer,
That is a really good point to remember for anyone that is involved in health, whether it be mental or physical, just do your thing, enjoy it, do it well and people may be able to heal themselves as a result.

Having the courage to say the wrong things and make mistakes is pretty much the 'right' thing to do, as far as I see it.


Aran

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Old 04-23-2007, 06:45 PM   #36
SeiserL
 
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Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

The territory doesn't change.
The map does.

Acceptance and compassion heal.

Walk towards the future positive solution instead of just avoiding the past negative problem. See the big picture and do what you already know is right.

Aikido is a different map that better prevents, manages, and resolves conflict on the same territory.

Lynn Seiser PhD
Yondan Aikido & FMA/JKD
We do not rise to the level of our expectations, but fall to the level of our training. Train well. KWATZ!
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Old 04-24-2007, 08:53 AM   #37
Aikibu
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Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

Quote:
Aran Bright wrote: View Post
I have recently begun to teach aikido to groups involved in alcohol and drug rehabilitation and was wanting to know if there is anyone else out there with experience with this sort of thing.
Been Clean & Sober 19 years and I have been working in or around Rehabs for over 17 years. I have had allot of success with Aikido principles and techniques especially with at risk kids.

Let me know if I can help.

William Hazen
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Old 04-24-2007, 02:15 PM   #38
Marie Noelle Fequiere
 
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Question Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

Let me take advantage of this thread to point to the fact that martial arts in general attract people who have problems, but they will not always tell the head instructor upon signing up. I think it is very important for a martial art instructor to learn to decipher symptoms - they can be very subttle - of spychological distress in a student, and also what the proper course of action - say in the case of an abused child - is, or the proper way to help the student with his or her issues.
I just wonder if this is a requirement for openning a martial art school in some countries.
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Old 04-26-2007, 02:46 AM   #39
Aran Bright
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Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

Quote:
Marie Noelle Fequiere wrote: View Post
Let me take advantage of this thread to point to the fact that martial arts in general attract people who have problems, but they will not always tell the head instructor upon signing up. I think it is very important for a martial art instructor to learn to decipher symptoms - they can be very subttle - of spychological distress in a student, and also what the proper course of action - say in the case of an abused child - is, or the proper way to help the student with his or her issues.
I just wonder if this is a requirement for openning a martial art school in some countries.
Hi Marie,

It's a really good point that you make. I wonder if someone could suggest what may be an appropriate course of action for someone who may be at risk?
What if they are putting others at risk?

Aran

http://brisbaneaikido.com

Brisbane Aikido Republic
Brisbane
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Old 04-26-2007, 07:04 AM   #40
SeiserL
 
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Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

Quote:
Aran Bright wrote: View Post
I wonder if someone could suggest what may be an appropriate course of action for someone who may be at risk? What if they are putting others at risk?
IMHO, here is where we get into really deep and really hot water. Martial arts training is not a substitute of competent psychological assessment, intervention, and treatment. I think a basic understanding of issues may be helpful to let people know when they are way over their heads.

That may be an interesting project for some of us to play way: a brief collaborative paper geared towards teachers.

Lynn Seiser PhD
Yondan Aikido & FMA/JKD
We do not rise to the level of our expectations, but fall to the level of our training. Train well. KWATZ!
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Old 04-26-2007, 09:29 AM   #41
Aikibu
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Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

Quote:
Lynn Seiser wrote: View Post
IMHO, here is where we get into really deep and really hot water.
Not in my experiance as a peer counselor...99% of this interaction occurs within a structured environment. Aikido "principles (not Martial Arts) of blending and harmony have been cited many times (heck Lynn I'll bet you use them yourself. ) as a valued tool in building trust between the "client" and the folks trying to help him recover/get him to admit he/she has a problem. I do agree there is a methodology to it and it works within a structured Professional "Treament Plan".

Quote:
Martial arts training is not a substitute of competent psychological assessment, intervention, and treatment. I think a basic understanding of issues may be helpful to let people know when they are way over their heads.
While not a subsitute it can be a powerful tool. Again I am speaking of Aikido principles NOT Martial Arts training. There is a big differance. I have done scores of 12 step interventions over the years' and worked on Skid Row, The VA, The California Prison System, and other places, and Aikido has served me very very well. That being said I am not a licensed Professional and you are absolutely right in regard to those aspects of treatment that Demand a Competent Professional as required by law and professional ethics.

Aikido principles are not a substitute for treatment. They can be used as a bridge to build trust between peers, as a tool for conflict resolution, and as a set of basic ideals to help folks who are prone to confrontation resolve it in a way which does not harm them or the object of thier fear/anger.

Quote:
That may be an interesting project for some of us to play way: a brief collaborative paper geared towards teachers.
I would love to participate and learn for you guys. I have used Ellis Amdur's and Terry Dobson's insights for years with great effect. Amdur Sensei has spent many many years in the field of conflict resolution. Perhaps we can ask him for his insight on the subject of Aiki principles and how they can be used to help at risk kids.

William Hazen

Last edited by Aikibu : 04-26-2007 at 09:34 AM.
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Old 04-26-2007, 03:58 PM   #42
SeiserL
 
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Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

Quote:
William Hazen wrote: View Post
(heck Lynn I'll bet you use them yourself. )
Yes, absolutely I do. I often apply Aikido principles to my treatment planning and sessions. I am probably more effective and efficient there than on the mat. That direction is easy.

My point is that the normal average strip-mall Aikido instructor, in the process of teaching a waza in class, is not prepared, educated, oriented, or equipped in viewing or doing it as a psychotherapeutic process. Nor should they be expected to be. I don't necessarily think that the mat alone is the place to workout our personal problems.

I do believe that Aikido is a great adjunct to treatment. I often refer and recommend it as part of a more holistic approach.

Lynn Seiser PhD
Yondan Aikido & FMA/JKD
We do not rise to the level of our expectations, but fall to the level of our training. Train well. KWATZ!
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Old 04-26-2007, 05:13 PM   #43
SteveTrinkle
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Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

[quote=Marie Noelle Fequiere;176471]Let me take advantage of this thread to point to the fact that martial arts in general attract people who have problems..."

Also, the martial arts often attract people who are seeking positive solutions for their problems....
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Old 04-26-2007, 06:05 PM   #44
Aikibu
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Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

Thanks Lynn though I would like it if you would define "Strip Mall Instructor" since I have known several Dojo's that were located in "Strip Malls" whose instructors had both wisdom and experiance.

Thanks Steve...Aikido is a Way or solution to what one is "seeking"
Not a haven for the problem focused but a refuge for those interested in a solution. Otherwise you don't last long in our Aikido.

William Hazen

PS. I can only speak for myself of course but the "effectiveness" of one's Aikido is measured in ones daily life outside of the Dojo. The Dojo is a place to learn how to live Aikido in our daily lives.IMHO there is a Big differance between practice and application, and I strive for symbiotic harmony between the two.

Last edited by Aikibu : 04-26-2007 at 06:20 PM.
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Old 04-27-2007, 06:25 AM   #45
SeiserL
 
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Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

Quote:
William Hazen wrote: View Post
Thanks Lynn though I would like it if you would define "Strip Mall Instructor" since I have known several Dojo's that were located in "Strip Malls" whose instructors had both wisdom and experiance.

IMHO there is a Big differance between practice and application, and I strive for symbiotic harmony between the two.
For sake of conversation and communication, generalities are used and "never" represent universals. There are always exceptions to the rules, and that's a rule that is "always" true. I trained in a "strip-mall-dojo" under a truly great master. But, in my experience, he was an exception.

Yes, practice and application are different. And yes, the symbiotic harmonizing of dualities has "always" been the way of the mystic and healing. There is no either/or.

Lynn Seiser PhD
Yondan Aikido & FMA/JKD
We do not rise to the level of our expectations, but fall to the level of our training. Train well. KWATZ!
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Old 04-27-2007, 08:08 AM   #46
Aikibu
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Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

Quote:
Lynn Seiser wrote: View Post
For sake of conversation and communication, generalities are used and "never" represent universals. There are always exceptions to the rules, and that's a rule that is "always" true. I trained in a "strip-mall-dojo" under a truly great master. But, in my experience, he was an exception.

Yes, practice and application are different. And yes, the symbiotic harmonizing of dualities has "always" been the way of the mystic and healing. There is no either/or.
Thanks for the reply AikiBrother. I confess I was hinting a little bit regarding the location of your great teacher's Dojo in my question.

To sum up from my experiance A background in Aikido or some form of conflict resolution is a great asset to have if you desire to help people. Practice Hard and keep your Heart open.

William Hazen
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Old 04-27-2007, 09:15 AM   #47
Marie Noelle Fequiere
 
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Do symbol Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

[quote=Stephen Trinkle;176695]
Quote:
Marie Noelle Fequiere wrote: View Post
Let me take advantage of this thread to point to the fact that martial arts in general attract people who have problems..."

Also, the martial arts often attract people who are seeking positive solutions for their problems....
I totally agree with that. But can you imagine a woman stepping in a dojo and saying: "You know, Sensei, I have been rapped, so I think that I need to learn to defend myself"? Or a kid may be nagging his parents for martial arts training without telling them that he is the playground's bully's favorite victim.
An instructor might lose his patience because a student just doesn't seem to be developping any sparing skills - especially in an art like Karate or Tae Kwon Do - in spite of learning everything else right. If this instructor has no idea that this sutdent has been the victim of a violent assault, he or she can make things a lot worst for the victim.
So I repeat, a martial arts instructor needs to be able to see symptoms of spychological trauma in a student. He or she might then have a private talk with this student, and, if needed, advise professional counseling. Meanwhile, this instructor's job is to modulate his or her teaching methods according to this student's special needs.
This is the way to be a good instructor.

Last edited by Marie Noelle Fequiere : 04-27-2007 at 09:16 AM. Reason: Spelling mistake.
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Old 04-30-2007, 06:10 PM   #48
Aran Bright
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Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

[quote=Marie Noelle Fequiere;176748]
Quote:
Stephen Trinkle wrote: View Post

I totally agree with that. But can you imagine a woman stepping in a dojo and saying: "You know, Sensei, I have been rapped, so I think that I need to learn to defend myself"? Or a kid may be nagging his parents for martial arts training without telling them that he is the playground's bully's favorite victim.
An instructor might lose his patience because a student just doesn't seem to be developping any sparing skills - especially in an art like Karate or Tae Kwon Do - in spite of learning everything else right. If this instructor has no idea that this sutdent has been the victim of a violent assault, he or she can make things a lot worst for the victim.
So I repeat, a martial arts instructor needs to be able to see symptoms of spychological trauma in a student. He or she might then have a private talk with this student, and, if needed, advise professional counseling. Meanwhile, this instructor's job is to modulate his or her teaching methods according to this student's special needs.
This is the way to be a good instructor.
I agree with you Marie, but how would a good instructor approach the subject of talking to someone they thought had a problem, so that you might suggest that they need further help?

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Old 05-02-2007, 02:14 PM   #49
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Do symbol Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

[quote=Aran Bright;177041]
Quote:
Marie Noelle Fequiere wrote: View Post

I agree with you Marie, but how would a good instructor approach the subject of talking to someone they thought had a problem, so that you might suggest that they need further help?
This is exactly what worries me. I am not a spychologist. All I know is that this should definitely happen in private, let's say that Sensei justs tells the student that he needs to have a word with him in his office. Now, the student may not be willing to talk about this particular subject. Sensei will need to use a lot of tact, and, if he fails, he will at least know for sure now that this particular student does have a problem. Winning the student's trust can take time and patience. But at least, Sensei will be carefull to modulate his teaching methods and have extra patience with this particular student.
Could anyone out there with a knowledge in psychology step in?
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Old 05-17-2007, 03:59 AM   #50
Aran Bright
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Re: Aikido for Drug/alcohol Rehab

Hi Mary,

Thanks for the book that you sent me. I have found it very interesting. I haven't read it cover to cover but just flick through it now and again and have found some good ideas for self defence training and insights into the psyche of someone going through the process of tackling physical and psychological battles.
It is a very honest book, it must have taken a lot of guts to put that out there.
I have passed into to a friend of mine who teaches peace class at university, mostly to future teachers. She has found it very useful also.
I would recommend it to anyone, but especially women who are going through the process of empowering and protecting themselves.

Kind Regards,

Aran Bright

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