Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido Forums
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > General

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 04-20-2007, 07:23 AM   #51
DarkShodan
Dojo: Shuurin Dojo - Omaha, Nebarska
Location: Omaha
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 157
United_States
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

Grrrrrr! Arrrrrrg! I really hate posts like this!

To put it simply, Aikido is for everyone. Unfortunately sometimes that means anyone with an opinion, a computer, and an internet connection.

Victims, aren't we all.
-- Eric Draven
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2007, 08:12 AM   #52
kironin
 
kironin's Avatar
Dojo: Houston Ki Aikido
Location: Houston,TX
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 1,035
United_States
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

<rei>
I see your Sensei has made the ultimate sacrifice for his students!

going from Hawaii to Nebraska.

  Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2007, 08:15 AM   #53
George S. Ledyard
 
George S. Ledyard's Avatar
Dojo: Aikido Eastside
Location: Bellevue, WA
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 2,670
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

The idea that you shouldn't have to pay for something spiritual... where does that come from? In the oldest forms of archaic religion it was the case that the student paid something to the teacher. There had to be an exchange to cement the relationship. It wasn't always money, but there was payment. this goes back before any of the modern religions were even founded.

This idea that money is somehow bad or that as a professional I am somehow more "commercial" is BS. I have put it all on the line. I gave up a good career to do what I do and make a fraction of what i could have made. I am 55 years old, at this point in my life, I can't turn around and go back and change my mind. It's a done deal. There's no way at this age I can change careers and start over.

I have a beautiful dojo that the students have invested in heavily over the years but I am the one on that lease, not them. Any student can walk away at any instant and I am the one still paying the rent.

I HAVE to deliver the goods. The guy who teaches at the local community center and has a job to support himself can be great or he or she can be mediocre, there's not much at stake. He can walk away without too much at risk. It's all at risk for me. If I can't deliver top notch training, if I can't inspire my students, I lose everything; I end up working at Starbucks.

I teach around the country. The income I make is crucial to my financial survival. That means I have to deliver! When I finish a seminar on Sunday night I need to have the folks who attended already wondering when I'll be back. People don't train with me because i am the head of anything... I can't pull into town and show the same old techniques I do at every seminar and then stand around and watch the clock while people train (like some Shihan I've seen). I have to give value for the time and effort people have put into attending the seminar. If i don't get invited back to almost every place that invites me I don't survive.

When you find a professional Aikido teacher you are looking at someone who has to be good at what they do. I am not saying that folks who aren't professional can't be as good or as inspiring. But they don't have to be. There are hundreds and hundreds of folks out there who have set themselves up as teachers of this art. How many of them could survive if they had to rely on that for their living? A small fraction.

I think folks should have a lot more respect for the professional Aikido teacher. He or she has put a lot more on the line than the folks who have a nice solid backup profession and for whom failure has little consequence. It sure as hell is the very worst martial art to have chosen to teach if it was about the money.

George S. Ledyard
Aikido Eastside
Bellevue, WA
Aikido Eastside
AikidoDvds.Com
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2007, 08:24 AM   #54
Larry Feldman
Dojo: Atlanta School of Aikido
Location: Atlanta, GA
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 366
United_States
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

Right as usual, George.

Without any discussion of how many hours of training it takes to achieve the proficiency you have.

Those hours of practice applied to any other endeaver would no doubt make you an 'expert' who is paid accordingly.

Even though some Shihan with larger organizations no doubt survive because they can go on the seminar circut, some only make it by contributions from senior members, not just dues.
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2007, 08:32 AM   #55
kironin
 
kironin's Avatar
Dojo: Houston Ki Aikido
Location: Houston,TX
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 1,035
United_States
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

Quote:
Lynn Seiser wrote: View Post
I love either/or propositions.
Either they are in it for the money or they are not.
Let us not forget the huge spectrum in between, the balance and harmony of duality, the possibility of both.
IMHO, you can love what you do professional and still make a living at it to support for family.
As usual Lynn is spot on.

and as someone, I think Tarik, pointed out, it's usually the NON monetary costs that students are not willing to pay to develop in aikido.

If I have a student that has demonstrated in attitude and practice that he is willing to make those non-monetary sacrifices run into financial problems, I would definitely work to fairly accomodate him.

Craig

  Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2007, 08:36 AM   #56
Chuck Clark
 
Chuck Clark's Avatar
Dojo: Jiyushinkan
Location: Monroe, Washington
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 1,134
United_States
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

Great post George. Thanks for speaking for all of us who do fill our rice bowl each day by teaching. The profit margin we get is seeing people learn and how it affects their lives, not to mention the letters, etc. we get from students from long ago who feel like what they learned in the dojo is partly responsible for their success, etc.

Thanks again, I couldn't have put it any better.

Chuck Clark
Jiyushinkai Aikibudo
www.jiyushinkai.org
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2007, 08:41 AM   #57
Keith R Lee
Location: Alabama
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 219
United_States
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

I'd agree that there is nothing wrong with a Aikido teacher earning money. The whole free-spiritual-mumbo-jumbo that gets tacked onto Aikido is indeed BS. Aikido teachers that sacrifice the rest of their lives to devote themselves to teaching Aikido should at least be able to support themselves comfortably. I'm not saying they need to be rolling on dubs but they should at least be able to have a decent lifestyle.

Keith Lee
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2007, 08:41 AM   #58
George S. Ledyard
 
George S. Ledyard's Avatar
Dojo: Aikido Eastside
Location: Bellevue, WA
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 2,670
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

Quote:
Craig Hocker wrote: View Post
If I have a student that has demonstrated in attitude and practice that he is willing to make those non-monetary sacrifices run into financial problems, I would definitely work to fairly accomodate him.

Craig
Of course... If a student who has demonstrated a commitment to training runs into trouble, I never worry about the money issue. I've let people who lost their jobs train for free until they got back on their feet. There's no point I can see in losing a good student along with the income if someone cannot pay. I find that those folks usually fall all over themselves to do things for the dojo.

What goes around comes around as well. I had a student who for many years didn't pay dues because he was always seriously broke. Now he is a Systema instructor and I am training with him. Guess what? he won't let me pay for anything.

George S. Ledyard
Aikido Eastside
Bellevue, WA
Aikido Eastside
AikidoDvds.Com
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2007, 10:05 AM   #59
crbateman
  AikiWeb Forums Contributing Member
 
crbateman's Avatar
Location: Orlando, FL
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 1,498
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

Quote:
George S. Ledyard wrote: View Post
I had a student who for many years didn't pay dues because he was always seriously broke. Now he is a Systema instructor and I am training with him. Guess what? he won't let me pay for anything.
EXACTLY! Your willingness to invest of yourself in this fellow has helped him endlessly, and now the benefit returns to you. Very compassionate, and a good example...
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2007, 10:50 AM   #60
mriehle
 
mriehle's Avatar
Dojo: New School Aikido
Location: Stockton, CA
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 320
United_States
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

George:

I almost feel I should forward post #63 on to someone I know who is particularly big on the martial-arts-instructors-shouldn't-be-paid idea. And I would, if I thought it would do any good.

But it won't.

So I'll content myself with knowing that I'm not the only one who feels like being a professional teacher is an honorable aspiration.

  Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2007, 12:15 PM   #61
DarkShodan
Dojo: Shuurin Dojo - Omaha, Nebarska
Location: Omaha
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 157
United_States
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

Quote:
Craig Hocker wrote: View Post
I see your Sensei has made the ultimate sacrifice for his students!

going from Hawaii to Nebraska.
This is off subject as usual, but Oh well. Yes, he has made the ultimate sacrifice, and we are very thankful. He keeps threatening to retire and move back to Hawaii. He made another great sacrifice by taking me on as a student. The man has no limits to his kindness and generosity.

Victims, aren't we all.
-- Eric Draven
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2007, 02:15 PM   #62
Janet Rosen
  AikiWeb Forums Contributing Member
 
Janet Rosen's Avatar
Location: Left Coast
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 4,331
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

I don't have much to add to this except I have to add my name to the chorus appreciating both George's position and his able articulation of it.

Janet Rosen
http://www.zanshinart.com
"peace will enter when hate is gone"--percy mayfield
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2007, 03:15 PM   #63
SeiserL
 
SeiserL's Avatar
Location: Florida Gulf coast
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 3,873
United_States
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

Quote:
George S. Ledyard wrote: View Post
The idea that you shouldn't have to pay for something spiritual... where does that come from?
IMHO, rules are always made by the people who think they will benefit from them. In this case, people who think they are entitled to get something for nothing and then are surprise that because they put nothing out got nothing in return.

I will continue to show up, pay my monthly dues, pay registration at the seminar, pay my way there and back, and be grateful to get thrown repeatedly to the ground. If that is "wealthy", then I am truly a rich rich man.

Lynn Seiser PhD
Yondan Aikido & FMA/JKD
We do not rise to the level of our expectations, but fall to the level of our training. Train well. KWATZ!
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2007, 05:05 PM   #64
tony cameron
Location: portland
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 37
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

"Where there is a will, there is a Way."

..that's what i say True words of wisdom! I believe that if a person really wants to practice Aikido, then they will find the means to do it. And then, once you are addicted, there's no way to stop: eating, sleeping, breathing, walking, dreaming, living the way of harmony Every breath, every step, every action and reaction Aikido. Healthiest addiction i've ever had. I am not rich btw, but i have made concessions. I don't own a car, i bike. Eat out less, go to the movies less often (Netflix people!), buy less brand new cloths and more dogis! I scrounge up that $65 every month out of necessity, not because i think it's kind of neat. Sure i hang out with my old friends less, but thats because i hang out at the dojo more! Financial priorities must be set in the correct order.



Best wishes to all,

Tony
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2007, 01:01 AM   #65
Charles Hill
Dojo: Numazu Aikikai/Aikikai Honbu Dojo
Location: Three Lakes WI/ Mishima Japan
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 837
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

Hi,

I personally don't have much of an opinion on the subject, BUT both Rinjiro Shirata and Morihiro Saito clearly said that to be a professional Aikido teacher is wrong and wanted their students to not teach professionally.

Charles Hill
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2007, 01:07 AM   #66
George S. Ledyard
 
George S. Ledyard's Avatar
Dojo: Aikido Eastside
Location: Bellevue, WA
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 2,670
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

Quote:
Charles Hill wrote: View Post
Hi,

I personally don't have much of an opinion on the subject, BUT both Rinjiro Shirata and Morihiro Saito clearly said that to be a professional Aikido teacher is wrong and wanted their students to not teach professionally.

Charles Hill
I don't know that Shirata Sensei ever taught very widely but Saito Sensei sure did. Did he teach all those seminars for free all over the world?

George S. Ledyard
Aikido Eastside
Bellevue, WA
Aikido Eastside
AikidoDvds.Com
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2007, 02:34 AM   #67
Peter Goldsbury
  AikiWeb Forums Contributing Member
 
Peter Goldsbury's Avatar
Dojo: Hiroshima Kokusai Dojo
Location: Hiroshima, Japan
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 2,187
Japan
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

On the other hand, Hiroshi Tada clearly thinks that he is a professional teacher and that this was what he was called to be. I do not know whether he is independently wealthy, or is/was supported by his family, in the way that Morihei Ueshiba certainly was.

However, there is a distinction to be made here and it might be more subtle to Japanese shihans, who regard themselves as inheritors of samurai tradition, than to non-Japanese. The distinction is between being a professional aikido teacher and running an aikido business.

A couple of weeks ago I had a conversation in Europe with an 8th dan shihan who had been a direct student of the Founder. He criticized the present Aikikai Hombu, on the grounds that it is run as a business. He clearly had the above distinction in mind, since he is a professional aikido teacher, but does not think he is running a business in the sense that he thinks the Hombu is. Nor, I suspect, does Tada Shihan.

Well, of course the Hombu is run as a business: it has to be, but it is a zaidan houjin (a legal foundation for tax purposes) and was so in O Sensei's time (as the Zaidan Houjin Kobukai), and so the aim is not to make a profit in order to pay shareholders. Accordngly there are clear fee scales, audited accounts, and the treasurer has to make regular reports on the state of the foundation to the government authorities.

It is curious that Tada Shihan is one of the few Japanese Shihans who does not have a source of income other than aikido. There are a few more, but also a large number of aikido shihans who teach aikido as a side activity, in addition to having some other source of income. Rinjiro Shirata, Morihiro Saito and, for a time, even Kisshomaru Ueshiba, were all in this second category.

In the same way that aikido shihans like Hiroshi Tada regard themselves as inheritors of samurai tradition, they are also inheritors of a fundemental problem connected with this tradition. Which is that the ideology of samurai as the embodiment of bushido was created at a time when they had lost their functions as warriors and were basically bureaucrats, practising their martial traditions inherited from the battlefield and gradually becoming impoverished, while the merchants in places like Osaka, much lower down on the social scale and of a class thought to be incapable of practising bushido, were raking in the money and lending some of it to the samurai. Lower-ranked samurai like Tasogare Seibei, who would be more likely than wealthy daimyo to be the counterpart of local aikido instructors, embody this problem forcefully.

So an aikido teacher is in a similar dilemma to a bishop or an abbot. His/hers is thought to be a spiritual calling, since we all know thgat aikido is supposed ot be fundamentally spiritual. However, if he/she makes too much money, there is always the chance of being attacked for being a money-maker.

Shrines and temples have also had this problem and they do not have the moral baggage of the New Testament. So, during the new year you go to a shrine like Izumo Taisha and buy an omikuji (a fortune slip). These are sold at various prices and so, presumably, the more you pay for the fortune slip, the clearer the vision possesed by the kami who is the bringer of the fortune.

Japan's New Religions like Omoto and its successors tend to be relatively wealthy and do not appear to appeal to the impoverished: the operating principle being the practicality of the spirituality practised. In other words, you get what you are prepared to pay for.

So, a dojo like the Hombu will charge fees and people who want to practise aikido know very well, without a shadow of doubt, that they have to pay the fees.

Last edited by Peter Goldsbury : 04-21-2007 at 02:38 AM.

P A Goldsbury
_______________________
Hiroshima, Japan
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2007, 03:18 AM   #68
Chuck.Gordon
Location: Frederick, MD
Join Date: Sep 2000
Posts: 509
United_States
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

George L. is spot on. Historically, budo training was only for the privileged. Throughout most of history, the peasants and farmers had far too much on their hands to worry about doing budo. Folk wrestling and things like stick fighting were taught in relatively unorganized fashion and mostly picked up on-the-job, as it were. They were too busy getting crops in, paying taxes and avoiding the chopping block to go to a dojo and spend hours and hours of valuable time practicing budo (and it wasn't too different in the West, for all that).

Only in recent decades has martial training become accesible to the public at large. It was for centuries, the domain of the warrior class, and if a peasant found himself drafted or levied into an army, some NCO-equivalent gave him a spear and said "Point goes that way, butt goes that way, don't stick your buddy, don't get out of step, don't break ranks. Now, go forth and kill a kami for mommy."

Look at the lists of students the old guys kept: admirals, politicians, wealthy merchants ... a very, very few ryuha admitted commoners until Meiji, and then when some of the samurai started teaching 'publicly' to support themselves after the reform had abolished their class and livelihood, they sought out and taught those who could afford it - merchant, politicians, senior military leaders who had the disposable income and spare time to devote to their studies.

Today, the idea that budo is for the masses has become popularized, but very few of the Old Guys really wanted to fill their dojo with the great Unwashed.

Today, we have a huge middle class, and we have the time and money to pursue things like ________ (insert the name of your favorite martial art or sport). And somehow, it's become the expectation that we should just let ANYONE in the door who walks up. That any Joe Schmoe should have the _right_ to train in any dojo or dojang he wishes. More of my thoughts on THAT can be found here, should anyone be interested.

If you're going to run a professional, commercial dojo, you MUST charge enough to pay rent, keep the lights on, and provide for your own continuing education. As a student in such a dojo, you're paying for what you get.

Me, I've chosen to go the other way. I teach in my home or in public facilities, and don't charge at all, unless you count showing up, giving of yourself and paying attention (waves at the other Chuck). My students pay a great deal for their training, but it's not cash, it's heart and mind and dedication.

I limit my classes to a small handful of folks, and prefer the older paradigms for transmitting the art that I love.

You can run a professional commercial operation, as George does, and maintain your integrity, provide quality instruction and produce quality students. However, many 'professional' budo teachers wind up short-sheeting themselves, so to speak, because they find themselves with more financial burden than they can (or are willing) to bear and start paying more attention to the numbers than to the quality. And others still will short-sheet their families in order to support a dojo that perhaps shouldn't be a profession as much as it should have been kept a hobby.

Going that direction means you're setting up a business, and you must be prepared to treat it as a business, and ensure you have a good plan, good resources and a solid grasp of how to handle the finances, marketing, recruiting and maintenance of your enterprise.

There are a good double handful of aikido teachers out there making it work, but far more, alas, simply aren't up to the challenge.

Is budo/aikido only for the rich? Not today, but as with any pursuit worth pursuing, there WILL be a price, fiscal or personal. It all comes down to what your training is worth to YOU.

  Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2007, 03:02 PM   #69
DonMagee
Location: Indiana
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 1,311
United_States
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

Quote:
George S. Ledyard wrote: View Post
T

When you find a professional Aikido teacher you are looking at someone who has to be good at what they do.
I have to disagree. All you have to be is a good con man. Brainwash a few people, and you can have the look of a great teacher. Bullshido.com has proven that.

- Don
"If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough" - Albert Einstein
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2007, 03:09 PM   #70
Mark Uttech
Dojo: Yoshin-ji Aikido of Marshall
Location: Wisconsin
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 1,224
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

It proves nothing Don. When you see good aikido, you automatically know what bad aikido is.

In gassho'

Mark
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2007, 05:57 PM   #71
Avery Jenkins
 
Avery Jenkins's Avatar
Dojo: Litchfield Hills Aikikai
Location: Litchfield, CT
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 151
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

Quote:
Don Magee wrote: View Post
I have to disagree. All you have to be is a good con man. Brainwash a few people, and you can have the look of a great teacher. Bullshido.com has proven that.
You pinned my own BS meter with that one, Don. OK, if you believe there are bullshido aikido sensei out there, at least have the courage to name names.

By casting aspersions on the unnamed, you by inference cast aspersions on all.

And with regards to the topic of this thread: I charge a pretty penny for my expertise, I have no problem with an aikido sensei doing the same.

Avery
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2007, 06:02 PM   #72
Lyle Bogin
Dojo: Shin Budo Kai
Location: Manhattan
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 588
United_States
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

If anything, we never pay our teachers enough.
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2007, 10:15 AM   #73
DonMagee
Location: Indiana
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 1,311
United_States
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

Quote:
Avery Jenkins wrote: View Post
You pinned my own BS meter with that one, Don. OK, if you believe there are bullshido aikido sensei out there, at least have the courage to name names.

By casting aspersions on the unnamed, you by inference cast aspersions on all.

And with regards to the topic of this thread: I charge a pretty penny for my expertise, I have no problem with an aikido sensei doing the same.

Avery
I did not say there was bullshido aikido teachers out there, however I believe there is one in my town. In downtown mishawaka, IN there is a guy who claims to be Shin Budo Kai. When I google Shin Budo Kai, I see this website http://www.shinbudokai.org/. This website does not show an indiana affiliate. Now this school is never open and says it teaches by appointment only. It is a fairly expensive part of town as far as rent goes, their flyer states they teach at least a dozen martial arts all mastered by the same man. It's prices are 50.00 a month higher then even the ata schools in the area. He claims tons of quotes from very famous people including some Ueshiba's about how awesome he is. He claims he can teach you how to defeat any MMA fighter, and even further, he claims that for an extra 200.00 a month, he can make you a black belt in ANY style in one year. He also says for an extra 100.00 on top of that each month, he can make you a certified teacher in ANY martial art in one year. Then you can as his flyer says "Open your own school and charge whatever you want!"

Now I have tried to contact this guy two times to try a class and see if he really is some kind of god. However, both times I did not receive a call back. As of last week however I noticed a new promotion on his building. Kids train free when a partent signs up, it also had something else in there that I was not able to read as I drove past to head to the college.

I would like to point out I have met most of the martial art teachers in my area. I know some very good martial artists who have made careers out of the martial arts. However, I have not yet met one person in the area who says this guy is legit. When I mention him most laugh or say it's not respectful to give their opinion of what he is doing. So I suspect this guy is bullshido and I know for a fact he has mcdojo practices. I have trained good aikido and I know good aikido when I see it. However, because aikido tends to be isolated into groups and there is no platform to test and see who really has good aikido, it would be very possible for a person with no skill at all to fake it and make tons of money.

So what if he can't get students who have seen good aikido, he can get and brainwash people with no training, then use them to influence new people to believe something is wrong with them for not believing this stuff works. Next thing you know, your getting 'knocked' out 20 feet away from your sensei and doing backflips on command.

Again, I do not yet have personal experience to call the guy I mentioned bullshido. But I have enough to suspect he probably is bullshido. This is my opinion. I'm trying to get in to take his class and see how he really is. If I find out otherwise, I'll apologize.

- Don
"If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough" - Albert Einstein
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2007, 03:03 PM   #74
kironin
 
kironin's Avatar
Dojo: Houston Ki Aikido
Location: Houston,TX
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 1,035
United_States
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

Quote:
Don Magee wrote: View Post
In downtown mishawaka, IN there is a guy who claims to be Shin Budo Kai. When I google Shin Budo Kai, I see this website http://www.shinbudokai.org/. This website does not show an indiana affiliate.
Don,

I don't think the website has all the Shin Budo Kai groups listed since I know of some that don't appear. It's possible that it's a small unofficial group. There are some senior people that post
on aikiweb that should be able to tell you quickly whether there is an Indiana group and who they are.

It does sound like some bullshido marketing at least.

  Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2007, 05:36 PM   #75
Basia Halliop
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 711
Canada
Offline
Re: Is Aikido Only For the Wealthy

I would suspect, that like most things, how much or if you get paid neither guarantees you're good not guarantees you're bad. Someone could be poor or so-so at Aikido but great at marketing and business, and make a decent amount of money (lots of students, lots of belts, some aerobic excercise, some babysitting kid classes, etc - probably even without being a con, if they were good enough at packaging and selling their product), they could be excellent at Aikido and teaching and skilled at knowing how to make the most of that skill and the respect gained by it to make a living, they could be excellent but not make any money off of it (say they prefer small numbers of students that don't pay much or prefer to keep fees low or just don't wish to run it that way or any number of other reasons), etc.... Personally I suspect it might make sense not to read too much into it either way.
  Reply With Quote

Please visit our sponsor:

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!



Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Aikido in Amsterdam, Terry Lax style... tiyler_durden General 11 11-03-2008 08:31 AM
Mixing Aikido with other martial arts Guilty Spark General 146 05-04-2008 10:10 AM
Women and Everybody Else in Aikido George S. Ledyard Teaching 113 03-16-2008 07:27 PM
Aikido: Its Spirit and Technique TAnderson General 0 02-27-2007 07:50 AM
Omoto-kyo Theology senshincenter Spiritual 77 12-04-2005 09:50 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:01 PM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2017 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2017 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate