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Old 01-11-2007, 06:06 AM   #26
Mark Freeman
Dojo: Dartington
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Re: Dojo Vs Street

Personally I haven't had to use physical' aikido 'in the street', although I have been in a couple of situations where I could have been in serious trouble had things escalated. So maybe my 'mindset' helped prevent things going any further.

What I have found is that aikido has helped me in the sea (surfing) on the piste (skiing) up a tree (climbing) and in my home (kids and partner) and in the workplace . I spend much more time in these places than I do on the street. The benefits of aikido are enormous and my little list I'm sure can be greatly added to.

I guess in the early days, it is natural in any martial art to wonder as to it's effectiveness. It should be to some degree as it is a 'martial' art. However many long term students of any art will tell you that 'street fighting' falls off the radar in time, as you are too busy studying the 'art' to worry about other things.

Kevin's question #7 How long does it take to become effective in aikido? anyone hazard a guess??

regards,

Mark

Success is having what you want. Happiness is wanting what you have.
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Old 01-12-2007, 06:10 PM   #27
Gregy
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Re: Dojo Vs Street

Yes, Aikido can definitely be used in the street. I for one have been in an altercation where i have been grabbed and yes, Aikido is great for that kind of thing.

And that is the beauty of Aikido. You can be grabbed and you don't have to hurt the other person.

Someone else asked about a fight with Tito Ortiz. Well, there is a difference between practicing an art and professional fighting. That is a different path.
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Old 01-13-2007, 02:49 AM   #28
Kevin Leavitt
 
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Re: Dojo Vs Street

Gregory Smith wrote:

Quote:
Someone else asked about a fight with Tito Ortiz. Well, there is a difference between practicing an art and professional fighting. That is a different path.
In what ways are they different?
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Old 01-13-2007, 01:34 PM   #29
Gregy
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Re: Dojo Vs Street

If you put a master of any one art (Judo, Karate, Wrestling, Aikido, Boxing) in a fight with a well-rounded 'fighter', the well-rounded fighter statistically will have the advantage.
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Old 01-13-2007, 05:02 PM   #30
mathewjgano
 
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Re: Dojo Vs Street

Quote:
Gregory Smith wrote:
If you put a master of any one art (Judo, Karate, Wrestling, Aikido, Boxing) in a fight with a well-rounded 'fighter', the well-rounded fighter statistically will have the advantage.
I'm not necessarily disagreeing with you, but where can I find these statistics from which you speak? I mean, the term "master" is pretty subjective, but I consider a master to be quite rare and a position which denotes "well-rounded" abilities; not a rank, though human conventions (such as egotism) tend to change this relationship. I agree with what I think is your point, though: that over-specialization destroys the broad-ranged dynamic which budoka typically seek to develop. Am I understanding you correctly?
Take care,
Matt

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Old 01-13-2007, 05:10 PM   #31
mathewjgano
 
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Re: Dojo Vs Street

Quote:
Gregory Smith wrote:
Well, there is a difference between practicing an art and professional fighting. That is a different path.
What about those who practice the art of professional fighting? I'd say two people can practice the same art and find completely different results in addition to the ones they hold in common. At my dojo, there are people who focus on sensitivity and there are people who focus on power and applicability. I'd say it's less about being an artist and more about the posture of one's mind which determines differentiation of paths. Tito Ortiz is an artist in my mind, as is Chuck Lidell and anyone else who studies not only some thing, but their own approach of studying that thing. To my mind, art and pragmatics aren't mutually exclusive.
Take care,
Matt

Gambarimashyo!
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Old 01-13-2007, 05:24 PM   #32
Kevin Leavitt
 
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Re: Dojo Vs Street

Gregory, so is what you are saying that there is a difference between someone who practices an art a few days a week such as aikido, and someone who has made it there profession to be a fighter, soldier, or police officer?
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Old 01-13-2007, 07:23 PM   #33
Gregy
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Re: Dojo Vs Street

Perhaps i am off topic here. If you were to be strong in an art be it Aikido or Karate you would have the advantage on the street with the assumption that the opponent is not trained.

However, if you were to fight someone who fights for a living the assumption is that person studies the strategy of battle and is prepared to make changes during the fight and is trained to do so. For example, if a professional fighter senses that the opponent is very skilled standing (vs. a Karateka), the professional fighter may choose to take the battle to the ground with the assumption that the Karateka would not be trained in Newaza.
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Old 01-13-2007, 08:07 PM   #34
Tharis
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Re: Dojo Vs Street

Quote:
Gregory Smith wrote:
Perhaps i am off topic here. If you were to be strong in an art be it Aikido or Karate you would have the advantage on the street with the assumption that the opponent is not trained.

However, if you were to fight someone who fights for a living the assumption is that person studies the strategy of battle and is prepared to make changes during the fight and is trained to do so. For example, if a professional fighter senses that the opponent is very skilled standing (vs. a Karateka), the professional fighter may choose to take the battle to the ground with the assumption that the Karateka would not be trained in Newaza.
I wonder how many people there are who wander around "the street" spending their entire lives examining every person they see as a potential rival in a fight?

In other words, I tend to think that when someone tries to attack you, there is usually an intent that is communicated in some way prior to the physical altercation, and that there is usually a modus operandi that precedes the intent. "Street" self defense, I think, is more about neutralizing the reasons and the intent before the physical conflict happens than winning the ensuing fight.

Towards those ends, I think Aikido is very effective when you get into it, maybe moreso than Karate or other more combative arts.

Your mileage may vary.
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Old 01-13-2007, 08:21 PM   #35
Gregy
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Re: Dojo Vs Street

That's a good point Thomas. Plus, from talking to police officer friends of mine, when people attack on the street they can be vicious and use and do things one would not expect.

It really can become complex if you think about it.
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