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Old 01-30-2002, 09:00 PM   #26
Edward
Location: Bangkok
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I have no doubt that some of you have owned and safely used wooden weapons for years without any maintenance. Probably these weapons have been very well finished by the manufacturer, and the wood itself of outstanding quality, or maybe your training does not include frequent strong contact.

Please note however that monthly oiling the wood not only extends its usage life but increases the safety as well because it reduces splintering and the possibility of breaking considerably.

In any case, I very much doubt that grease from your hands would be enough to maintain the wood, unless you have incredibly greasy skin

Wood and leather maintenance has been a part of my studies (archaeology). I doubt that your weapons would be that old (several hundred years ) but the principle still applies nontheless.

Cheers,
Edward

Last edited by Edward : 01-30-2002 at 09:05 PM.
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Old 01-31-2002, 05:14 AM   #27
Mares
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Quote:
Originally posted by Edward

In any case, I very much doubt that grease from your hands would be enough to maintain the wood, unless you have incredibly greasy skin

Don't knock it 'till you try it .
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Old 02-01-2002, 10:44 PM   #28
Reuben
 
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I was just wondering if any one ever used berlian wood for bokken? I don't really know what it's called but its layman's term is iron wood. And it is the strongest wood in the world i've been told. Not too sure how brittle it is though but it is used as columns in old building constructions too.

However I feel it's rather too heavy to be used as a bokken so I'm just curious if there was anyone who had it.

and trust me it IS heavy. Much heavier than any traditional bokkens and even heavier than many metals hence its name.
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Old 02-02-2002, 01:04 PM   #29
guest1234
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I must admit I am intrigued by weapons lasting a long time without oiling...I am tempted to stop oiling one and see how it fares compared to the others. I have always sanded (as necessary) and oiled my weapons, weekly when I lived in the desert, now every 3 weeks or so. It makes me wonder if that was really needed, although even if the wood doesn't last longer, I guess I like how it looks and feels (smooth like glass) enough that it would be worth it just for looks. And I'd know mine anywhere, even if I couldn't rely on the dainty diameter as a hint...

That reminds me of one night we had used our bokken, then put them down for the next technique. My sensei, who is a large man with big hands, reached for his to show us something, picking up mine (which was nearby) by mistake. They are the same length, and mine seems to be heavier than most larger ones I've handled (probably all that oil ) so it wasn't clear to him he had the wrong one until he wrapped his hands around the hilt. The puzzled look on his face was priceless. I'm sure he was wondering whose that was, as he quickly switched to his.
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Old 02-02-2002, 03:18 PM   #30
Johan Tibell
Dojo: Aikido Dojo Gamlestaden
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Well, at my dojo we never sand nor oil any of our weapons and many of them have been in use for many years, think some of them is 10+ years old. They're are of the type you can buy from Saito Sensei or in tskuba (sp?) mountain.

Regards,

Johan
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Old 02-04-2002, 08:32 PM   #31
Tony Peters
Dojo: Mt Tantalus, Kaimuki Judo club
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oiling

I'm one of those build a better mousetrap type of people but after lots of experimentation I've come to the opinion that simple mineral oil found at the drug store for less than $3.00 a pint is the best treatment for Martial Arts weapons (I actualy use it on my Iaito as well). I oil about once a month but then we practice Jodo outside so rain isn't uncommon (I've come home well smurfed from really rainy days but that's another story). For storage they alway go back to my horizontal rack after use, this is when I look at them to see what damage I've done to them mishitting sensei's boken/jo.

As far as wood goes I've tried Hickoy and Bujin's laminated Hickory but I don't like the feel of either when compared to Kashi... at least for a Jo. Exotics are another matter...I've got a bokken made out Ifit that I love but it kills other people's weapons I retired it to Suburi's I made a jo out of the same wood that I later cut down to a Tanjo. This catches my sensei's eye every time I take it out (much like my eye get's caught on his Shiken). I have two Hickory Tanjos that serve me well, for some reason I don't mine the shorter length. I have a BIG Black Walnut Subrito that I love to use but don't enough. Lately though I've just been playing with the tanjos. BTW Iron wood is strong, ugly and lifeless feeling much like laminated woods are. If you are up to shaping it, it isn't much harder than oak to work but finding a straight peice isn't easy.

Peace
Tony
Suck, Squeeze, Bang, Blow
That's what makes my Thumper go
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Old 02-04-2002, 08:54 PM   #32
Edward
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Re: oiling

Quote:
Originally posted by Tony Peters

I've come to the opinion that simple mineral oil found at the drug store for less than $3.00 a pint is the best treatment for Martial Arts weapons
I'm not a doctor but obviously mineral oil is a poisonous substance which is not permitted to be poured in common sewage waters as it contaminates the soil. In this case, I wonder if it wouldn't have any effect on skin especially with the kind of contact and friction we have with wooden weapons.

I understand that even common linseed oil is diluted with such substances (containing lead usually). I myself use the pure undiluted version which takes about 2 days to dry but is safer.

Cheers,
Edward
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Old 02-05-2002, 11:20 PM   #33
Tony Peters
Dojo: Mt Tantalus, Kaimuki Judo club
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Re: Re: oiling

Quote:
Originally posted by Edward


I'm not a doctor but obviously mineral oil is a poisonous substance which is not permitted to be poured in common sewage waters as it contaminates the soil. In this case, I wonder if it wouldn't have any effect on skin especially with the kind of contact and friction we have with wooden weapons.
Cheers,
Edward
Umm NOT!!!!!
Mineral oil also known as baby oil without the scent. Makes a good lubricant...err...for backrubs. Often used as laxative. Definatly not poisonous. I think you are thinking of Mineral Spirits. Anyway Linseed oil is made from Lin seeds otherwise know as Flax/linen. My only complaint is that it yellows over time. Boiled linseed oil takes about a day in a dry climate; raw never actually dries. Tung oil mixed 50-50 with boiled linseed oil works well as a finish (this is what Bujin uses) but I eventually ended up using Watco for anything that I make for other people. The Japanesse have some interesting finishes that I can't wait to try out when I move there later this year. It will be neat to try differant things with wood

Last edited by Tony Peters : 02-05-2002 at 11:25 PM.

Peace
Tony
Suck, Squeeze, Bang, Blow
That's what makes my Thumper go
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Old 02-06-2002, 03:00 AM   #34
Edward
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Re: Re: Re: oiling

Quote:
Originally posted by Tony Peters


Mineral oil also known as baby oil without the scent. Makes a good lubricant...err...for backrubs. Often used as laxative. Definatly not poisonous.
Sorry! I misunderstood the mineral oil part. So it's baby oil? In Thailand it is used for massages (the scented one). That's a very loving way to treat your weapons, pal

I'll try it soon.

Cheers,
Edward
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Old 02-06-2002, 03:07 AM   #35
jk
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Edward's concern about toxicity leads me to ask whether anyone's tried an edible oil for lubricating weapons...olive oil, sunflower oil, etc. I would think the only concern there would be the oil turning rancid on you...

Regards,
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Old 02-06-2002, 03:35 AM   #36
Edward
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Quote:
Originally posted by jk
Edward's concern about toxicity leads me to ask whether anyone's tried an edible oil for lubricating weapons...olive oil, sunflower oil, etc. I would think the only concern there would be the oil turning rancid on you...

Regards,
Great Idea John! It would be then possible to prepare your salad and lubricate your weapons from the same bottle. Another more sophisticated option would be to add a lot of olive oil in your food. Obviously it is very good for the heart and lowers your LDL cholesterol as recent research proves, and then your hands become very oily and this will automatically lubricate your weapons
(sorry Michael )
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Old 02-06-2002, 05:32 AM   #37
guest1234
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Quote:
Originally posted by jk
Edward's concern about toxicity leads me to ask whether anyone's tried an edible oil for lubricating weapons...olive oil, sunflower oil, etc. I would think the only concern there would be the oil turning rancid on you...

Regards,
OK, well, I have, kind of...
I use cold-pressed lindseed oil, and spend a lot of time rubbing it in, and wiping it off (being military, this does not strike me as ridiculous behavior...)

But I got tired of being teased about the smell of lindseed oil when someone used my bokken, so... as a final coat I use a few drops of orange oil I bought from a cooking catalogue. Also, when the energy level is high or I am anticipating going to a seminar and will have to put my weapons in baggage, I melt some wax to rub into (and off again ) my weapons, and toss a few drops of orange oil into that. I have no idea how bad any of this is for the wood, but it makes me feel like I am doing something to help it...
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Old 02-06-2002, 10:35 AM   #38
Edward
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Quote:
Originally posted by ca


OK, well, I have, kind of...
I use cold-pressed lindseed oil, and spend a lot of time rubbing it in, and wiping it off (being military, this does not strike me as ridiculous behavior...)

But I got tired of being teased about the smell of lindseed oil when someone used my bokken, so... as a final coat I use a few drops of orange oil I bought from a cooking catalogue. Also, when the energy level is high or I am anticipating going to a seminar and will have to put my weapons in baggage, I melt some wax to rub into (and off again ) my weapons, and toss a few drops of orange oil into that. I have no idea how bad any of this is for the wood, but it makes me feel like I am doing something to help it...
I thought I was the only weapons maniac, but it seems I have found my match. If we happen to meet one of these days, we will compare our weapons to see which has the best gloss

Cheers,
Edward
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Old 02-06-2002, 06:16 PM   #39
jk
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Quote:
Originally posted by Edward


Great Idea John! It would be then possible to prepare your salad and lubricate your weapons from the same bottle. Another more sophisticated option would be to add a lot of olive oil in your food. Obviously it is very good for the heart and lowers your LDL cholesterol as recent research proves, and then your hands become very oily and this will automatically lubricate your weapons
(sorry Michael )
An even greater idea Edward! I suggest you test the theory yourself, but why stop with the olive oil? I heard saturated fat is much better for your weapons (higher melt point and all). Just eat as much KFC as you can for a month, and let us know the results...mmm...finger lickin' good...

Regards,
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Old 02-06-2002, 07:43 PM   #40
Edward
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Quote:
Originally posted by jk


An even greater idea Edward! I suggest you test the theory yourself, but why stop with the olive oil? I heard saturated fat is much better for your weapons (higher melt point and all). Just eat as much KFC as you can for a month, and let us know the results...mmm...finger lickin' good...

Regards,
Very funny indeed.... But why am I not laughing.
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Old 02-07-2002, 01:24 AM   #41
jk
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Quote:
Originally posted by Edward


Very funny indeed.... But why am I not laughing.
Just funnin', Edward...

Or is it ?

Regards,
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Old 02-07-2002, 08:52 AM   #42
Tony Peters
Dojo: Mt Tantalus, Kaimuki Judo club
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Food oils

I have used olive oil to oil some of my wooden creations especially the hair items that I make for my wife. olive oil does wear off though and saffron oil doesn't seem to sink in. I've a friend in Jodo who swears by Walnut oil but I don't have a secondarry use for it. Grapeseed oil works real well but it is green and tinted the wood that way. I usually add a couple of drops of cardamon oil to the bottle of mineral oil befor I oil my weapons. I use cranberry oil for my wifes boken and Jo.

Peace
Tony
Suck, Squeeze, Bang, Blow
That's what makes my Thumper go
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Old 02-07-2002, 10:31 AM   #43
Edward
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Quote:
Originally posted by jk


Just funnin', Edward...

Or is it ?

Regards,
Wakarimashita
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Old 02-07-2002, 10:35 AM   #44
Edward
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Re: Food oils

Quote:
Originally posted by Tony Peters
I have used olive oil to oil some of my wooden creations especially the hair items that I make for my wife. olive oil does wear off though and saffron oil doesn't seem to sink in. I've a friend in Jodo who swears by Walnut oil but I don't have a secondarry use for it. Grapeseed oil works real well but it is green and tinted the wood that way. I usually add a couple of drops of cardamon oil to the bottle of mineral oil befor I oil my weapons. I use cranberry oil for my wifes boken and Jo.
Where can you buy all these different kinds of oil? Are there any specialized shops? This is one of my favorite subjects so forgive me for asking too many questions, but why do you add the cardamon oil, and why do you use a different oil for your wife's weapons?

Cheers,
Edward
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Old 02-07-2002, 01:27 PM   #45
Tony Peters
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Re: Re: Food oils

Quote:
Originally posted by Edward


Where can you buy all these different kinds of oil? Are there any specialized shops? This is one of my favorite subjects so forgive me for asking too many questions, but why do you add the cardamon oil, and why do you use a different oil for your wife's weapons?

Cheers,
Edward
Grape seed and Walnut oil can be found at most gourmet food stores, neither is cheap. As for the cardamon and cranbery oils they are esssence oils and any good granola health food type store should have essence oils for sale...also not cheap but using only a few drops they last forever. As to why I use them? For the smell I like cardamon and my wife likes cranberries. I've made my own Choji for my sword for 2 years now and spent considerably less than I would have on the real thing.

Peace
Tony
Suck, Squeeze, Bang, Blow
That's what makes my Thumper go
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Old 02-08-2002, 12:58 PM   #46
Arianah
Dojo: Aikido of Norwalk
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I know absolutely nothing about weapons or care thereof, but I did run across an article on Bu Jin Designs's website that I thought some of you weapons nuts might be interested in

"Long term care
With use, sweat from your hands will react with the oil and wood, and the grain may rise slightly in places. Impact with other training weapons will cause dents and these spots should be sanded and oiled as needed. Monthly maintenance is a good idea.

Do not expose your weapons repeatedly to extremes of heat or cold; e.g. do not store in the trunk of your car. When transporting your weapons in the trunk of a car do not place heavy bags on top of them.

When training
The life of your training weapon depends, in large part, on proper technique. Many a bokken and jo have met with early demise due to the crude but (sometimes) effective "baseball bat" technique.

A spiral movement (created by a quick twist of your wrist) should be used when striking with the jo, bo or bokken. In most cases there should be no head-on impact; instead, one weapon should glance off the other. Attention to good technique will extend the life of your wooden training weapon considerably. "

http://www.bujindesign.com/faq-wooden.html

Sarah
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Old 02-11-2002, 05:43 AM   #47
Mares
Location: Australia
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Well, I'm a non oiler myself, but if this is of any interest. Linseed oil is used to oil Cricket bats. I assume it would be something similar with a baseball bat but I never really got into baseball. Cricket bats are usually sanded back and oiled at regular intervals.

I don't know how that translates to weapons but a I guess that's just another useless fact.
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