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Old 12-17-2001, 10:17 AM   #26
L. Camejo
 
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Dojo: Ontario Martial Arts
Location: Mississauga, Ontario
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 1,423
Canada
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Circle

Quote:
Originally posted by Creature_of_the_id

Hi Edward
see, I dont see it as very aiki to show people the way out of the door for having bad manners. why teach manners and etiquette (sp?) to those who already have it? would it not make more sense to show those principles to the people who would benifit from it most?
the people who you would show the door to are the people who would benifit most from training in the way.

yes, it is very easy and comfortable to teach aikido to those who you judge to be correct in your own view. but is it not a very good way of learning self awareness, in teaching those that you judge to be 'bad'. to learn not to fight them or resist them by showing them the door.. but instead allowing yourself to show them acceptance and relieving yourself of personal limitations.

anyway, I find those who 'act up' or do not obey etiquette even after the guidlines have been layed out either change their actions over time, or leave of their own free will.

my 2p anyway
Hi Kev,
I agree with you on this. Though I may not have a few months ago.

I have been dealing with an identical situation over the past few months and had almost reached the point of either putting the student out of the dojo or possibly bouncing him so hard off the mat that the loose screw in his head would be knocked back into place

In speaking to my sensei and those on this forum I decided to "open my heart" a bit and stick it out.

After giving him a copy of "The Art of Peace" to use for meditation and distributing exerpts on Aikido character expectations from a variety of books, including "The Secrets of Aikido" to the entire class, the atmosphere has changed somewhat, and the person's attitude in class has changed tremendously.

Today, I must say that as long as he keeps his ego in check, this student is slowly becoming one of my most promising. I look back at when I wanted to eject him from the class and realise that "harmony" as we so easily refer to as Aikidoka is not as easy in life when someone else does not appreciate the value of that harmony. It is here that we are challenged by the universe to prove to ourselves whether we truly believe in this thing called harmony. Do we open our hearts and minds to all expressions of the universe and attempt to blend with and understand it? Or do we sit on our laurels and lay judgement?

I do believe that safety is a PRIMARY concern in training, but sometimes we must risk our own comfort zone to understand and help others.

"Love your enemy"-Jesus Christ.
"True victory is self victory"-Morihei Ueshiba.

I do apologise for the length of this post.
Sumimasen.
L.C.

--Mushin Mugamae - No Mind No Posture. He who is possessed by nothing possesses everything.--
http://www.tntaikido.org
http://www.mushinkan.ca
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Old 12-18-2001, 01:46 PM   #27
eric carpenter
 
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Dojo: hagakure
Location: washington UK
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United Kingdom
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etiquette

I think good manners are important to show
thanks for being taught and respect for your uke.It also makes the do jo a more pleasurable place,if you enjoy what your doing you will continue to train.
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Old 12-19-2001, 02:11 AM   #28
Creature_of_the_id
 
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Dojo: Alnwick aikido club (UKAU)
Location: Newcastle, England
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England
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Wow, Hi Eric.
I live in Vigo, only a couple of minutes from you

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