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Old 11-22-2005, 07:08 AM   #51
Nick Simpson
Dojo: White Rose Aikido - Durham University
Location: Gateshead
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 916
United Kingdom
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Re: How serious a teacher are you?

Im a fairly new instructor, so I tend to make a lesson plan, I dont always stick to it, but it helps me think when Im up there.

What I teach depends on whos attending the class as well, if someone is grading soon then we do things that are on their syllabus are that they find hard and need the extra practise on. If there are a lot of begginers I tend to teach some ukemi exercises.

I always tend to teach some softer ukemi and a lot of sword work, relating some of the principles of Iai to aikido hand technique as well as that of aikiken. My sensei and our regional head are usually in attendance, so there is little point in me teaching what they do, as they can do it better. So I try to teach my perspective on things as well as some stuff that doesnt get taught too regularly and that people wont have seen. It seems to be working pretty well so far

They're all screaming about the rock n roll, but I would say that it's getting old. - REFUSED.
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Old 11-22-2005, 07:11 AM   #52
Steve Mullen
Dojo: White Rose (Sunderland)
Location: Washington
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 270
England
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Re: How serious a teacher are you?

and you look pretty doing it

"No matter your pretence, you are what you are and nothing more." - Kenshiro Abbe Shihan
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Old 11-22-2005, 07:27 AM   #53
Nick Simpson
Dojo: White Rose Aikido - Durham University
Location: Gateshead
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 916
United Kingdom
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Re: How serious a teacher are you?

I might not be serious, but at least I look pretty!

They're all screaming about the rock n roll, but I would say that it's getting old. - REFUSED.
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Old 03-21-2006, 05:45 AM   #54
Rocky Izumi
Dojo: GUST Aikido Club
Location: Salwa, Kuwait
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 381
Kuwait
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Re: How serious a teacher are you?

Quote:
Mike Braxton wrote:
And yes, you are correct in your assumption that kihon waza is always done statically.
Mike, how do you do Shomenuchi Ikkyo statically?

Rock
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Old 04-05-2006, 11:55 PM   #55
Perry Bell
Dojo: Deshi-do
Location: Melbourne / Australia
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 39
Australia
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Re: How serious a teacher are you?

Quote:
Dave Organ wrote:
Ola, Amigos!
(That's the extent of my Spanish.)
I have a general question I'd like to throw out to the group:
Many who post on this forum are Aikido instructors at one level or another, from Senseis to Sempais to kyu levels teaching beginners, etc. My question is, how serious are you about teaching? Do you show up for class and say "OK, gang, what do you want to learn today? OK, let's try that." Do you spend hours a few days before class studying material, writing and revising lesson plans, and rehearse a class until it shines?
When tasked to teach, is teaching secondary to your Dojo experience or primary?
In other words, how do you personally approach teaching Aikido?
Just a personal note, while I myself take teaching very seriously, I don't believe there is any right answer here. There are a great many teachers I've met with extremely loose attitudes towards instruction, and who are far, far better than I am, and am ever likely to be.
I look forward to your responses, this should prove an interesting conversation!
Dave
Hi Dave,

I have been teaching karate and Aikido for more than 20 years and I always prepare the lesson a couple of days before the class date, however this does not always fall to plan, sometimes you get to the class and find the demographic is not capable of doing the prepared class so you have to improvise and teach a class which would suit the people that turn up.

So in answer to your question yes and no I guess the sign of a good teacher is one that can adapt to changing situations, with out throwing out the essence of what he/she want to teach.

One of the things I plan of any of my classes is to have a theme for the evening, so my students not only practice the basics of either Karate or Aikido or my body balance classes, but something that they can get their minds around with regards to their own spirituality and place in the club and the world.

I find that running the classes like this gives the students something else to discuss besides the techniques they are practicing, it give them a chance to understand and communicate on a different level.

I have been running my classes like this for a long number of years and have found the students after a few month realize that training is not just about the physicality but it goes a lot deeper than what you can see.

Good question Dave,

Take care, be happy and smile lots

Perry
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Old 04-06-2006, 12:42 AM   #56
Lan Powers
Dojo: Aikido of Midland, Midland TX
Location: Midland Tx
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 659
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Re: How serious a teacher are you?

New to teaching.
I have found it to be a great benefit to me, personally, in my own growth in the art.
(Slow as that may be)
The funny thing is, I am not really a teacher at all.
The class is there, the students are formed up, the art is there to be presented, but I am really another student who (for tonight) gets to set the choices of where we explore.
Sensei has given me a set-time to do this, and I guess you would call it MY class (everyone else does) but I am just a fill-in for the "real" instructor. (At least in my own mind.)
Not putting myself down, I enjoy feeling out the direction the class could go, *as mentioned many times the best laid plans go out the window when the interaction starts.

I have gotten to learn a lot this way. I can only hope the other students there with me have gained from our time as well....It can be quite humbling.
Here's hoping I don't let them down.


< I think it is difficult to understand all that our teachers give to us until we start passing it along to others.>
This quote from Bronson earlier rang very true to me.
Lan

Last edited by Lan Powers : 04-06-2006 at 12:47 AM.

Play nice, practice hard, but remember, this is a MARTIAL art!
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Old 04-06-2006, 06:39 PM   #57
Perry Bell
Dojo: Deshi-do
Location: Melbourne / Australia
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 39
Australia
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Re: How serious a teacher are you?

Quote:
Lan Powers wrote:
New to teaching.
I have found it to be a great benefit to me, personally, in my own growth in the art.
(Slow as that may be)
The funny thing is, I am not really a teacher at all.
The class is there, the students are formed up, the art is there to be presented, but I am really another student who (for tonight) gets to set the choices of where we explore.
Sensei has given me a set-time to do this, and I guess you would call it MY class (everyone else does) but I am just a fill-in for the "real" instructor. (At least in my own mind.)
Not putting myself down, I enjoy feeling out the direction the class could go, *as mentioned many times the best laid plans go out the window when the interaction starts.

I have gotten to learn a lot this way. I can only hope the other students there with me have gained from our time as well....It can be quite humbling.
Here's hoping I don't let them down.


< I think it is difficult to understand all that our teachers give to us until we start passing it along to others.>
This quote from Bronson earlier rang very true to me.
Lan
Hi Lan,

Welcome to a new world, one where frustration and Patience go hand in hand. Prepare your self to learn, a very big lesson about yourself, by stepping out of our comfort zones this is where we truly learn. Welcome to the journey of learning.

Ponder this question

"What is the difference between a teacher and an instructor? "

I have my own opinion on what I feel the difference is, if there is one.
I wont tell you my thoughts on the question, because I don't want to fill your mind with my beliefs, and cloud yours, so I will let you come to your conclusion, then let you know mine.

If anyone else on the forum feels they would like to contribute to this question please feel free I think it is still in the same vain as the original thread.

Take care, always remember to smile and you will be rewarded with one back.

Perry
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Old 05-06-2006, 02:18 PM   #58
Mark Uttech
Dojo: Yoshin-ji Aikido of Marshall
Location: Wisconsin
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 1,218
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Re: How serious a teacher are you?

An instructor goes over lesson plans by rote, a teacher shares himself. That is my take on it anyway... In gassho
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Old 05-07-2006, 11:06 PM   #59
Rocky Izumi
Dojo: GUST Aikido Club
Location: Salwa, Kuwait
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 381
Kuwait
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Re: How serious a teacher are you?

Not very serious. I kid around all the time.

Rock
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