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Old 02-15-2006, 07:07 AM   #51
ian
 
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Dojo: University of Ulster, Coleriane
Location: Northern Ireland
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 1,654
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Re: Music in the Dojo?

Our training hall is next to a bar, which often has bands practising in it! Thus we get an involuntary taste of music. Probably helps, if only because it stops me talking!

---understanding aikido is understanding the training method---
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Old 02-15-2006, 01:22 PM   #52
ikkitosennomusha
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 241
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Re: Music in the Dojo?

Quote:
Nick Simpson wrote:
'Off topic, what I have always believed in and could never get a sensei to do, was to conduct training once in a while with everyone wearing their everyday, street atire. We are so used to training aikido in our element, e.g., in our hakama, keikogi, mats, etc., I feel it would be beneficial to see how the mechanics of aikido will work in a real environment so if a situation should arise, one is more aware of how things will be outside the dojo.'

Great idea, I've been wanting to do something like this for a while, I also want to play the tanto - marker pen game and the find the best weapon you can in your house game

Seriously, some aikido techniques are optimal in a dojo environment and not in a "real" environment. Some examples would be that you cannot slide your foot into "ai hanmi" stance on concrete wearing shoes with rubber grips so, your foot has to slightly come up a little more than in the dojo comprimising stability (only minutely). You are also not going to be doing much of suwari waza on concrete either if you can help it.

There are other ideas that come to mind and I think it is good to see some of the limitations that a "real" environment provides and how one might overcome/adapt to the environment. Just a thought.
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Old 01-05-2017, 04:05 AM   #53
Heather
Dojo: Morpeth, Northumberland
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne
Join Date: Oct 2016
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Re: Music in the Dojo?

We often train in sports centres so don't get an option about music, especially when there's gymnastics or something going on elsewhere.

However, my instructor is going to be speaking about aikido on a local radio show and he's been asked to suggest a song which they can play which he thinks represents aikido. We've come up with some interesting suggestions but does anyone have any good ideas?

Something quite mainstream would probably be best!
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Old 01-05-2017, 04:41 AM   #54
Hellis
Dojo: Ellis Schools of Traditional Aikido
Location: Bracknell
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 638
England
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Re: Music in the Dojo?

does anyone have any good ideas?

Something quite mainstream would probably be best![/quote]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

You could try " Soft Shoe Shuffle "
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cSr1_HQXV8
( giving my age away with this oldie )

Henry Ellis
Co Author ` Positive Aikido `
http://britishaikido.blogspot.com
http://kazuo-chiba-sensei.blogspot.com/
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Old 01-05-2017, 07:36 AM   #55
lbb
Location: Massachusetts
Join Date: Jun 2006
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Re: Music in the Dojo?

Mainstream? That represents aikido? That would make people think about aikido, something that the general public knows nothing about? Seems a bit of a stretch. Use some taiko instead, perhaps. Or shakuhachi or something.
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Old 01-05-2017, 09:40 AM   #56
dps
Join Date: Apr 2006
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Re: Music in the Dojo?

For background music played low I like Bach`s Cello Suites.

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA70D07FB6C624D3A

dps
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Old 01-07-2017, 08:47 AM   #57
rugwithlegs
Dojo: Open Sky Aikikai
Location: Durham, NC
Join Date: Apr 2013
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Re: Music in the Dojo?

Quote:
Mark Freeman wrote: View Post
In my career life as a training consultant, I used music to great effect in the learning environment.
I do not however use music in the dojo, probably because it is just not part of my experience so far.
My question is:
1. Does anyone use music in their dojo, and if so what?
2. If you were to stop for a moment and imagine in your mind aikido being practiced as if you were an observer, what would the soundtrack be?

Just a thought, curiosity sometimes forces me to do these things!

regards
Mark
p.s. for me the answer to 2 is Miles Davis
I do Taiji as well, and I had several Chinese art teachers using music. Of course, so does capoeira.

Militaries in the past, drums were used to keep the whole army in the same cadence to improve formation movement. I'd maybe go there for kata work.

I have used Brian Eno, native flute, and music for massage for stretching, meditation. (Not in Aikido class).

Really, a few times I wanted to break a few students of their habit to fall into a rhythm during randori. I have not done this work out yet. Tell everyone to move slowly and peacefully as possible while blasting Rob Zombie. Call for super fast aggressive reps like striking a makiwara with a bokken as many times as they can in a minute while playing dance of the sugar plum fairy. Meditate with random sounds going off at weird intervals. Play with complimentary music too.

If a patient or their family is angry at work, I need to be more calm. When people tell me to stop, that might be the time I need to move faster, when I am told "nothing to see here, " that might be when I need to take a look or act more firmly. I know several students who just fall into a rhythm and reflect their environment. Playing with their environment might be a good way to break them of this.

Finish up with a clip from a bad 80's movie like Iron Eagle where a fighter pilot is twice as bad-ass, stronger and better when he gets to play his music in the cockpit. Finish up with a brief clip from the next movie where the pilot's Walkman jammed so he got blown out of the sky and a new actor took the lead role. Ask the class who needs the correct sound track to succeed in their lives.
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Old 01-11-2017, 06:47 AM   #58
fatebass21
 
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Dojo: Westminster Tenshinkai Aikido Dojo
Location: Fountain Valley, CA
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Re: Music in the Dojo?

No music in the dojo for me....but yes, Chumbawamba Tub Thumping would suffice as a soundtrack. Someone needs to put it to a YouTube vid with technique clips.

Only issue with that is Chumbawamba got knocked down....and never got up again

Chris Sawyer
Training day is every day
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Old 01-25-2017, 09:10 AM   #59
Heather
Dojo: Morpeth, Northumberland
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne
Join Date: Oct 2016
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Re: Music in the Dojo?

Thanks for the suggestions! Tubthumping is a great one. I also liked "Let the Bodies Hit the Floor" by Drowning Pool!
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Old 01-25-2017, 02:38 PM   #60
langenoir
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 18
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Re: Music in the Dojo?

I don't run a dojo, but sometimes on my way to the dojo I'll listen to
Shakuhachi
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xsihxORASks
The other day sensei was playing it when I came to the dojo, I hope he keeps doing it. I think music would be a great addition.

I think Native American flute compliments it nicely.
Carlos Nakai
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=19nm5_nAwQg

Then again sometimes I listen to Rammstein/Sepultura/Prodigy/whatever on the way to the dojo. It's good to get pumped up on days I'm not feeling 100. I would not recommend that for the dojo.
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Old 01-28-2017, 04:25 AM   #61
observer
Location: Santa Barbara, CA
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Re: Music in the Dojo?

One day I went to the cinema to watch a film Tango directed by Carlos Saura. It is not without significance for this statement that years ago I was a player and judo instructor and now I'm judansha of Ki Society. Watching the movie, I realized what, really, in the Argentine tango is all about. I reached into tango's roots and I put a bold thesis that is derived from combat knife training as a music background to boring, repeated over and over movement sequences, known in our community as kata. This is rhythmic music with constantly changing pace. When going to Argentina to verify this thesis, I received the confirmation from famous Juan Carlos Copes, the father of Argentine tango resurrection after the fall of military junta, which it banned. Music was accompanied with words of protest, which made the tango died for almost two generations. It was replaced by Presley, the Beatles and the new popular type of music.

Thus, the Argentine tango clearly defines the role of partners. We are talking about partners, since the thirties of the last century they were basically only men. Often, this fact is explained by the lack of women, yet my thesis has its justification. Thus, one of the partners leads (read - attacks), while the other, exclusively follows him (read - avoid attacks). When they dance very close to each other (read - close embrace) leaders and similarly followers hook the legs (read - breaking balance to lead to the collapse). These combinations of legs rather fit into judo, no less, my presence in Buenos Aires gave me the idea that tango definitely is closer to me to aikido. Well, this city never sleeps. Every night, between midnight and dawn in almost fifty places, people are dancing the tango. These events are called milonga (not to be confused with the kind of tango - next to tango and waltz) and are usually very crowded. I've been on those where the dance floor contained 500 pairs. The trick is to not mutually deduct. Argentine tango masters, are masters of evasion. Probably some of you read that Morihei Ueshiba was always the first to reach the target on a crowded train station. Feel free to discuss.
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Old 01-28-2017, 08:12 AM   #62
rugwithlegs
Dojo: Open Sky Aikikai
Location: Durham, NC
Join Date: Apr 2013
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Re: Music in the Dojo?

Quote:
Maciej Jesmanowicz wrote: View Post
One day I went to the cinema to watch a film Tango directed by Carlos Saura. It is not without significance for this statement that years ago I was a player and judo instructor and now I'm judansha of Ki Society. Watching the movie, I realized what, really, in the Argentine tango is all about. I reached into tango's roots and I put a bold thesis that is derived from combat knife training as a music background to boring, repeated over and over movement sequences, known in our community as kata. This is rhythmic music with constantly changing pace. When going to Argentina to verify this thesis, I received the confirmation from famous Juan Carlos Copes, the father of Argentine tango resurrection after the fall of military junta, which it banned. Music was accompanied with words of protest, which made the tango died for almost two generations. It was replaced by Presley, the Beatles and the new popular type of music.

Thus, the Argentine tango clearly defines the role of partners. We are talking about partners, since the thirties of the last century they were basically only men. Often, this fact is explained by the lack of women, yet my thesis has its justification. Thus, one of the partners leads (read - attacks), while the other, exclusively follows him (read - avoid attacks). When they dance very close to each other (read - close embrace) leaders and similarly followers hook the legs (read - breaking balance to lead to the collapse). These combinations of legs rather fit into judo, no less, my presence in Buenos Aires gave me the idea that tango definitely is closer to me to aikido. Well, this city never sleeps. Every night, between midnight and dawn in almost fifty places, people are dancing the tango. These events are called milonga (not to be confused with the kind of tango - next to tango and waltz) and are usually very crowded. I've been on those where the dance floor contained 500 pairs. The trick is to not mutually deduct. Argentine tango masters, are masters of evasion. Probably some of you read that Morihei Ueshiba was always the first to reach the target on a crowded train station. Feel free to discuss.
https://youtu.be/tcreQPUgt4k

I just went to the first YouTube I could find that wasn't DWTS. The attitude of the dance, the lifts and rapid leg locks and kicks. Your thesis is compelling. I would love it for you to share a clip that you feel best demonstrates the dance and your thesis. Combat skills masquerading as dance is, I believe, common in a number of cultures. I have heard Paso Double is also about macho combat skills but usually it looks so embellished and contorted that I see the attitude more than combat skills.
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Old 01-28-2017, 02:07 PM   #63
observer
Location: Santa Barbara, CA
Join Date: Feb 2006
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Re: Music in the Dojo?

Actually, the most exiting moment for me from the movie 'Tango' contains everything I wish for my combat skills. I am talking about calmness, precision, and self-confidence. There is no reason to miss the idea of using any rhythmical music in aikido dojo. What we are doing over there is just repetitions to polish our skills.
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Old 03-22-2017, 09:33 AM   #64
MattMiddleton
 
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Dojo: MUN Aikido
Location: Paradise, Newfoundland and Labrador
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Canada
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Re: Music in the Dojo?

At one point, our dojo was right next to an aerobics class, and they played their music LOUD. Besides being a bit distracting during practice, it made hearing our teachers difficult for me. My hearing is already kind of poor, so personally I'd prefer not to have music in the dojo.

That being said, if you run the place, and want to play music, seems to me that it's your prerogative.
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