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Old 10-06-2005, 06:05 PM   #1
Paula Lydon
Dojo: Aikido Shugenkai
Location: Colorado
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 427
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Policing self

~~So I've gotten to this point in my training where I really want to focus on relaxing, softening, timing and position as to use as little motion as needed, connecting to and being sensitive to uke, recognizing when I need to act and do not need to act. In this process, I realized how much I was caught up in 'completing' whatever technique sensei had presented. These days, if what I get from uke doesn't fit with the shown response, I do something else; or if uke lets go, bails at will, moves past me, I simply let them go as opposed to the past where I forced them through the given technique. Many times now I look like I haven't the faintest idea what I'm doing as I just step aside and perhaps move uke along (as they might already be headed that way and not going for my center). Or I might just stand there with them holding my wrist until they get bored and move...I find that now I'm learning much more in any given moment when uke truly comes for my center and gives me a reason to do something (or other. I've lately gotten many odd or quizical looks from various uke because I haven't 'done the technique' to them. Oh well...

~~I've found also that it's improved my own ukemi overall as I am more mindful of and consistant in not doing any of those things that I'm now adjusting to in other's ukemi.

Open for views on this

~~Paula~~
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Old 10-07-2005, 07:31 AM   #2
ian
 
ian's Avatar
Dojo: University of Ulster, Coleriane
Location: Northern Ireland
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Re: Policing self

Yeh, I think an agressive state of mind definately interferes with proper practise of aikido. I remember asking my chief instructor what to do when people 'dive-over' (i.e. throw themselves into a fall before the technique) and he said you just have to deal with exactly what they are doing and let them do it without trying to hold them up. A similar situation is when someone really isn't striking you - there is no need to do anything.

However, I wouldn't suggest aikido can't be proactive. Try this... hit an uke in the face really hard and see how much more aggressive they get with their subsequent attack.

---understanding aikido is understanding the training method---
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Old 10-07-2005, 10:45 AM   #3
Devon Natario
 
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Dojo: Northwest Jujitsu/Coeur D'Alene, ID
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Re: Policing self

Good to see this Paula. You have moved into another step of your training.

Many times even young Sensei (new teachers), will look at you funny and ask why you didn't complete the technique.

We had a guy in class that with the slightest movement would act like he was being killed and almost run from the techniques being done. After time you get to know when an Uke is pretending to be hurt, or is really hurt. I kept telling him that pretending is not the point to martial arts. We are practicing on the mats to prepare ourselves for the streets. We have to KNOW we are doing it right. So pretending and not striking realistically does not help our growth.

With your step toward realism and "feeling" your opponents energy, you are going to improve drastically.

Devon Natario
Instructor
Northwest Jujitsu
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Old 10-07-2005, 01:33 PM   #4
SeiserL
 
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Location: Florida Gulf coast
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Re: Policing self

IMHO, there is always a time to stick with the form, find varaiations of the form, and break from the form.

Lynn Seiser PhD
Yondan Aikido & FMA/JKD
We do not rise to the level of our expectations, but fall to the level of our training. Train well. KWATZ!
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Old 10-08-2005, 01:29 AM   #5
mathewjgano
 
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Dojo: Tsubaki Kannagara Jinja Aikidojo; Himeji Shodokan Dojo
Location: Renton
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Re: Policing self

Quote:
Ian Dodkins wrote:
Yeh, I think an agressive state of mind definately interferes with proper practise of aikido. I remember asking my chief instructor what to do when people 'dive-over' (i.e. throw themselves into a fall before the technique) and he said you just have to deal with exactly what they are doing and let them do it without trying to hold them up. A similar situation is when someone really isn't striking you - there is no need to do anything.

However, I wouldn't suggest aikido can't be proactive. Try this... hit an uke in the face really hard and see how much more aggressive they get with their subsequent attack.
I'm not sure I follow your meaning. By "let them do it" do you mean don't try to physically force their movements? If so, to a point I certainly agree. You wouldn't want to hurt someone while they're in the midst of a roll/fall, but it seems very important to not let people get into bad habbits too. I like your idea about bopping someone in the face, but I wouldn't do it "really hard". For one thing, some people will shy away even more and unless you know the temprament of the person, your lesson could have the opposite result as intended. As for me, it would just piss me off to have someone use unnecessary force on me. A slight, but firm, bop is one thing, a "really hard" hit is quite an other...though I know our sense of what that phrase means could be quite different from each other.
Take care,
Matt

Gambarimashyo!
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