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Old 10-20-2009, 02:17 PM   #133
Erick Mead
 
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Dojo: Big Green Drum (W. Florida Aikikai)
Location: West Florida
Join Date: Jun 2005
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Re: Blending with the attack.

Quote:
Josh Phillipson wrote: View Post
Hi Erick. I think I understand what you write. But I think you glossed over the hard part… the making of contact and the ‘joining' part itself.
If you would wrestle a bit with the way shear is created or occurs it would seem quite simple. Perpendicular opposite stress. Shear. To start with -- let shear occur passively -- like scissors meet and slide tangentially in opposition, taking up all the tensile or compressive slack in doing so. Sword work (kiri-otoshi, suriage, and surotioshi, for starters) is irreplaceable in providing this "feel" of what you are looking for. Then, more directly, you can be initiating the shear by an oscillation (or wave, essentially) into the connection as it occurs. Then you can reduce that to the essential shear stresses of the action, without all the overt motion. All the aiki-taiso are designed with that basic thought in mind -- to build the sense of how moving shear or shear stress in the body actuates it -- yours as well as his.

Quote:
Josh Phillipson wrote: View Post
In your example it was taken as a given. "Drop your weight on it". The sliding-down-a-potential that you describe is pretty clear I think.
"Slide" implies a passiveness that is not present. If it doesn't fly out like a watermelon seed between wet fingers, you didn't do it right -- and will not see the relationship to what Shioda is doing.... It is much more energetic and catastrophically sudden. A leveraged attempt at some thing similar, would be to spring it back against the table, between thumb and forefinger, and then lift slightly to release the sprung column. In the levered example, it rotates from the top where you are levering it, and slips at the base, and in the sheared example it rotates from the shear point at the base as it slips. In leverage, the perceived point of action is located at the perceived point of contact. In shear, as you can see in this very simple comparison, the perceived point of action is remote from the perceived point of contact. "I am already behind him," I believe O Sensei said.

Quote:
Josh Phillipson wrote: View Post
But what does it have to do with the changed body and how you manage energy internally? It doesn't fit.
It has to do with substituting the action of shear for the action of joint leverage -- throughout the the body. Octopus do it all the time, you can too. You just have learned to fall back on the bony structures as levers and fulcrums, instead of the body/limbs as continuous structure operating in progressive shears which can actuate both compressive and tensile stress simultaneously.

Quote:
Josh Phillipson wrote: View Post
Your example (which is true and works) is truly passive.
No it isn't -- you dropped your arm. Not passive at all. Most simplified examples are more static than not, it is unavoidable. But Shioda's action is as plain an illustration of the more energetic dynamics of the same exact mechanism as one could hope to show on video.

Quote:
Josh Phillipson wrote: View Post
I do not expect the ‘blending' due to ‘aiki' is passive at all. Sagawa makes it clear it is a technique. Does doing aiki on an inanimate object have any meaning?
Yes -- if the same mechanism provokes certain reflexive reactions in a living human body amplifying the effects outside the parameters of voluntary action. Done one way it is aiki-age (extensor reflex -- sankyo, for a vanilla example), done another way it is aikisage -- (flexor reflex -- nikkyo, for another example). But those are training modes, and if you grab my wrist with a will -- I can pop uke up or drop uke down by the same mechanism that those use. The chopstick is compressive shear buckling but tensile shear buckling works as well... like a wave in a rope.

Quote:
Josh Phillipson wrote: View Post
If it is only what you write; I say we have all figured that out already and can summarize it like this: Follow the slip path. Maintain your structure.
No more like "connect in or generate a shear, buckling structure and then do whatever you darn well like because there is no more structure standing in your way..."

Quote:
Josh Phillipson wrote: View Post
You describe the ‘joining' part by allowing your weight to go thru the chopstick. Let's call that making/sharing a closed groundpath circuit through the chopstick. I don't disagree with that. I can kind of see how this may result in a sticky feeling if I was the chopstick..you know; by virtue of the fact that there is a now a resistance to having this ‘circuit' opened. That sticky feeling is relevant to the aiki technique; but I think other bigger parts are missing. Your way was passive; it was relaxing the arms weight.
I could just as easily have told you "let it go" left. right or back toward you -- but those are more difficult to see how to accomplish, because they have to be slightly "accented" (dare I say, with some "intent" -- whereas my example allows the body's own structure and gravity show you the way. With a live partner you also could pop him up, as much as drop him down and out , and it is the same mechanism -- but while the "passive" rope-lifting wave model holds for aiki-age - the sensitivity of the kinesthetic structural system in triggering extensor reflexes comes into play. That is part of what I read from what little Sagawa will say of his "technique" Asagao is at the heart of that -- which he DOES mention explicitly -- but also furitama.

Quote:
Josh Phillipson wrote: View Post
At this point; I think and expect the magic of aiki technique is more about how you actually train and mediate your own body; and how this enables a new dynamic of making this joining.
I don't disagree, and the actuation of your body in this way must be exactly the same as the actuation of the opponent's body, such that moving him is not essentially different from moving yourself . But -- without a simple (and mechanically correct) image for your structural intuition to operate on, you have no objective guide -- and are hostage to the vague vocabulary and personal assurances (however,well-intentioned or true) rather than honing and trusting your own perceptions -- for what they objectively are -- rather than what you or anyone else have subjectively assumed they were. "Seat of the pants" flying kills people. Objective reference is the only sure measure. Senses don't lie -- but they are easily misinterpreted in shifting frames of reference. And as I showed you above, when we change from leverage to shear as our operating mode -- we changed the frame of reference -- right along with the center of rotations.

Cordially,

Erick Mead
一隻狗可久里馬房但他也不是馬的.
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