View Single Post
Old 08-07-2014, 12:37 PM   #154
RonRagusa
Dojo: Berkshire Hills Aikido
Location: Massachusetts
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 809
United_States
Online
Re: Demonstrating aiki, demontrating aikido.Same thing ?

Quote:
Keith Larman wrote: View Post
And... If we presume that the theories presented by some of these people are correct as to the body development aspect underlying all of this, then using terms like "relax" or "feel the ki in your fingertips", or "blend with them" are incredibly insufficient for those who haven't had the decades of training to develop the body necessary to actually have something to pin those words on.
Well... I have those decades of training and when I hear those phrases I can easily relate them to what I'm feeling. That said, I quite agree with you that for someone without a solid background of training, descriptive phrases be they esoteric, mechanistic or mystically based can only provide a platform to build on.

Quote:
Keith Larman wrote: View Post
But if we can more directly train the body, build the structures, enliven the passageways across longer reaches, then the sooner the student can attach those less prosaic ideas to the feeling they have. But it all then begs the question whether the more esoteric descriptions were really necessary to begin with.
I don't understand why people think the Aikido training syllabus (at least as I learned it) doesn't contain the required implements to "train the body, build the structures, enliven the passageways across longer reaches...". My training, from the very beginning, emphasized those very qualities, although using different descriptive terminology. The descriptions, I think, are necessary simply because beginning students seem to crave verbal explanation to back up and give meaning to what they're doing.

Quote:
Keith Larman wrote: View Post
Or if we're just infusing it with all sorts of wonder philosophical meaning to satisfy our own desires for it to be more deep, more mysterious, more magical and further increasing how special it is to have it.
On a singularly personal level, it is deep, mysterious, magical and special. But that's not how it was presented to me and not a message I try to convey when I teach. I leave it up to each student to discover for him/her self the depth, mystery and magic of Aikido... or not.

Ron

  Reply With Quote