Thread: aikido is...
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Old 11-24-2010, 12:58 PM   #92
C. David Henderson
Location: Santa Fe New Mexico
Join Date: Sep 2008
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Re: aikido is...

Quote:
Mary Malmros wrote: View Post
I've made some study of Buddhism, thanks. The Buddhist philosophy of non-duality does not mean or imply that any one thing is everything, or can become so by virtue of being "part of the universe".
I think this view is consistent with my understanding of Dogen's essay on being-time and existence:

An old buddha said:
For the time being, I stand astride the highest mountain peaks.
For the time being, I move on the deepest depths of the ocean floor.
For the time being, I'm three heads and eight arms.
For the time being, I'm eight or sixteen feet.
For the time being, I'm a staff or whisk.
For the time being, I'm a pillar or lantern.
For the time being, I'm Mr. Chang or Mr. Li.
For the time being, I'm the great earth and heavens above.

"The time being" means time, just as it is, is being, and being is all time.

The sixteen-foot golden buddha-body is time; because it is time,
it has time's glorious golden radiance.

You must learn to see this glorious radiance in the twelve hours of your day.

The three heads and eight arms is time; because it is time, it can be in no way different from the twelve hours of your day.

****
The mind and the word are equally being-time. Their reaching and
not-reaching alike are being-time. Even when the time of their
reaching is not yet over, the time of their not-reaching is come.

Moreover, the mind is the time of the immediately present ultimate Dharma.

The word is the time of the key to higher attainment.

Reaching is the time of the body of total emancipation.

Not-reaching is the time you are "one with this and apart from this."

You should attest and affirm thus;
you should being-time thus.

We should say:

Half-reaching of mind and word is also being-time.
Half not-reaching of mind and word is also being-time.

Written in Kosho Hörin-ji,
at the beginning of winter, the first year of Ninji (1240)

Dogen (1200-1253)
Shobogenzo Uji, (1240)
Translated by N. A. Waddell
The Eastern Buddhist, Vol. XII, No. 1 (May 1979), pp. 114-129

David Henderson
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