Thread: 2 Martial Arts
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Old 09-07-2015, 05:39 PM   #18
rugwithlegs
Dojo: Open Sky Aikikai
Location: Durham, NC
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 432
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Re: 2 Martial Arts

I like what Katherine is saying, but the balance is tricky. I think people who do solid Kihon technique like Morote Dori Kokyu Ho, Kokyu Doza, and Ushiro ryotekubidori without timing and momentum do get better integration and structure - it is how I started. Timing is harder to do, and harder to benefit from, without good structure.

Kawahara Sensei had a long list of techniques for grading. For an example. Shomenuchi only: For 5th Kyu, Shomenuchi: Ikkyo to Yonkyo Omote and Ura, Iriminage, Kotegaeshi, Shihonage Omote and Ura, and others with the understanding we were going for precision and accuracy in basics. Fourth Kyu included many of the same named movements, plus Shomenuchi Koshinage and Gokyo. The variations were a little more flowing and less solid. 3rd Kyu had some of the same named movements again, with even more flowing variations and finally Shomenuchi Kokyunage three ways. Kokyunage was expected to show timing and placement. I think this was a good systematic way to develop good structure and then open students up to timing and movement. We broke away from static in stages, one type of movement at a time.

But, people often took three years to get third Kyu. While "It's all about the journey, etc, etc" a friend of mine joined the FBI and had six months of training in All aspects of her job including combat, investigation, firearms, law...so three years to get to this level of training is something I have had to reevaluate for personal reasons.

I was not practing much with weapons, relative to other associations. Jo Dori, Tachi Dori were very much about getting off the line and entering, and exploring different timing. Am I entering as the bokken is raising or as it lowers, etc.

I like how I learned, but years ago I started to play with some short weapon drills for a beginner who never got off the line - shomenuchi, move inside or outside and Tsuki without blocking, etc. I still get back to this as I see people doing suburi without getting off the line, or kumitachi/kumijo focusing on weapon on weapon contact instead of getting to where they cannot be touched. Another aspect of Mr Powell's question - how to train someone to get to dynamic movement properly (good placement, structure, power, timing) not just When.

Last edited by rugwithlegs : 09-07-2015 at 05:44 PM. Reason: Freaking auto correct
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