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Old 08-14-2003, 07:56 PM   #14
L. Camejo
 
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Dojo: Ontario Martial Arts
Location: Mississauga, Ontario
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 1,423
Canada
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Freaky!

Quote:
Peter Rehse (PeterR) wrote:
the hand needs to be placed WITHOUT hitting uke. If you are not capable of doing all atemi techniques with a soft placement of the hand, then you are not worthy of doing randori..
I agree wholeheartedly with this statement.

Ever connect percussively with an elbow during gedan ate???? Ouch!Talk about game over.

I do believe though, that when teaching the range of possible applications of atemi waza (outside randori) the student should be made aware of the percussive, grappling and other possible applications that may extend naturally from basic atemi waza.

Exercises like Hontai no tsukuri can develop one's sense of distance while closing at speed - which is a basic way of training effective but non-percussive atemi waza for randori and other applications. I think this basic method is very effective for teaching the correct entry for the atemi waza, which will determine the quality of the technique to follow to some extent.

My students have often found that entering with the hand sweeping up the centreline (as in shomen ate, aigamae ate and the like) sets up one's posture quite nicely for applying a powerful, but non-percussive atemi waza, powered by body movement. On the flip side, when one attempts to extend the arm straight out from a bent elbow while entering, the possibility of percussive convergence is greatly increased and much control may be lost as upper body strength tends to become more of a factor.

Just some rambling after some hard training tonite. Non-percussive atemi waza became the balance breaking tech of choice in applying tenkai kotehineri against a variety of aggressive tanto attacks with follow up strikes in the event of poor kuzushi.

Hope you all can forgive the rambling.

L.C.

Last edited by L. Camejo : 08-14-2003 at 08:01 PM.

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