Thread: "Muto"
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Old 03-05-2005, 07:30 PM   #18
Kent Enfield
 
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Location: Oregon, USA
Join Date: Jul 2002
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Re: "Muto"

Quote:
Dave Humm wrote:
I studied Muso Shinden Ryu through the BKA (British Kendo Association) albeit disjointed study due to the distance I had to travel to the dojo which later closed because the building housing the dojo burned down. I later continued my study through the aikido organisation to which I belong (having several BKA Yudansha within it) As I explained (when asked) on the e-budo site, My interest in Iai/batto is purely from a development of aikido. I do not at present have an Iai Sensei closer than 130 miles to me and thus I am simply continuing to train using the skills previous taught and applied to aikido. This is why there is no mention of grades or lineage on my website. I claim nothing. (despite being aggressively questioned via PM by one over zealous individual)
So what of the above are you including in your "over ten years Iai study"? Is that ten years of long distance study in the BKA, or 6 months in the BKA, 6 months with your aikido organization, then 9 years of self-study? You'd avoid a lot of this confusion if you simply didn't list "Batto-ho" as if it were a separate art alongside aikido and karate on your dojo's website.
Quote:
Dave Humm wrote:
How does it get to jodan if it hasn't be raised at some point ? (lol) and my point being that if the sword is already at jodan at the point when muto dori is required, it would be very unsound of a person to attempt to close maai.
And any swordsman or woman with a modicum of training knows this. Obviously, the sword cannot magically get from the saya to jodan without being raised at some point, but if the sword wielder does this before engaging, then from the other person's perspective, the sword is already raised, eliminating the small chance to enter while the sword is being raised.
Quote:
Dave Humm wrote:
I approached the article and the training accompanying it, from the perspective of giving the students "half" a chance of closing maai whilst the sword was brought from chudan to jodan.
Do you explain to your students that no half-way competent swordsperson would give them that chance? If you do, then great. If not, then I think you're running the risk of building a false expectation among your students, which your article seems to be an attempt to thwart.
Quote:
Dave Humm wrote:
and now we discuss semantics, my article was a generalism to which you wish to add specifics.
Um, no. I was just explaining why I hadn't considered the scenario.
Quote:
Dave Humm wrote:
So by this reasoning the method does not exist? Because you've not seen it.
Again, no. I never said such methods didn't exist. You pointed out an untrue assumption I held, and I was simply explaining my reasons for assuming thusly.

Kentokuseisei
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